Surprise! Jennifer Aniston joins Instagram with epic photo alongside ‘Friends’ cast

Entertainment News  Surprise! Jennifer Aniston joins Instagram with epic photo alongside 'Friends' cast https://linewsradio.com/surprise-jennifer-aniston-joins-instagram-with-epic-photo-alongside-friends-cast/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.(NEW YORK) — It’s the moment many fans have been waiting for: Jennifer Aniston has officially joined Instagram.

Aniston shocked the internet on Tuesday morning by posting an epic group photo along with the Friends cast on one of social media’s biggest platforms.

“And now we’re Instagram FRIENDS too. HI INSTAGRAM,” she wrote in her caption.

Since releasing her initial post, Aniston has already received over 2.3 million likes and has already gained more than 261,000 followers in a matter of hours.

In Aniston’s bio, she writes, “My friends call me Jen,” and she currently follows under 100 people that include notables such as Michelle Obama, Kate Hudson, and Adam Sandler.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 15 Oct 2019

Woman from Russian ‘troll factory’ that targeted 2016 election briefly detained in Minsk

WORLD NEWS Woman from Russian 'troll factory' that targeted 2016 election briefly detained in Minsk  https://linewsradio.com/woman-from-russian-troll-factory-that-targeted-2016-election-briefly-detained-in-minsk/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

Martin Holverda/iStock(MOSCOW) — A Russian woman indicted by special counsel Robert Mueller as an employee of the Russian “troll factory” that conducted a propaganda campaign targeting the 2016 U.S. presidential election was briefly detained and then released in Belarus on Tuesday, reportedly at the request of the United States.

The Russian foreign ministry on Tuesday confirmed that the woman, Anna Bogacheva, was detained in Minsk by Belorussian law enforcement agencies, but did not give any details on why she had been held. Alexander Malkevich, a Russian rights ombudsman who has previously linked himself to the troll factory, wrote on social media that according to his sources Bogacheva had been detained “by Interpol at the request of the U.S.” in relation to the election meddling in 2016.

Bogacheva was one of 13 Russians charged by the Department of Justice in February 2018 as part of Mueller’s investigation into Russia’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 election. In the indictment, Bogacheva and the others were accused of working at the Internet Research Agency, the St. Petersburg-based company, better known as a troll factory, which prosecutors said churned out tens of thousands of divisive social media posts in an attempt to influence the American electorate. For those efforts, the Justice Department chose to charge Bogacheva and the others, along with the Internet Research Agency, with defrauding the United States.

The Internet Research Agency was set up and funded by a businessman viewed as close to Russian President Vladimir Putin. The businessman, Evgeny Prigozhin, was nicknamed “Putin’s Chef” because he runs a catering company that has supplied state events. Prigozhin, the IRA and his catering firm, Concord Catering and Concord Management, were also charged in the same Justice Department indictment.

Bogacheva herself was accused of working at the IRA from at least April 2014 to June 2014, according to the Justice Department indictment. She allegedly worked on the “Translator” project, the effort by the IRA that specifically targeted the U.S. population with English-language posts on social media platforms, including YouTube, Facebook and Instagram. The indictment alleged Bogacheva had overseen the project’s data analytics department.

In addition, Mueller’s investigators said Bogacheva was one of a group of IRA employees that had traveled to the United States in summer 2014 with the goal of collecting “intelligence” for the IRA’s disinformation operations.

“BOGACHEVA, together with other Defendants and coconspirators, planned travel itineraries, purchased equipment (such as cameras, SIM cards, and drop phones), and discussed security measures (including “evacuation scenarios”) for Defendants who traveled to the United States,” the indictment read. It said Bogacheva had traveled widely, visiting Nevada, California, New Mexico, Colorado, Illinois, Michigan, Louisiana, Texas and New York between June 4 and June 26, 2014.

Bogacheva was also charged with lying on her visa application for that trip.

None of the 13 Russians indicted for their work at the Internet Research Agency have ever been arrested and this would be the first time a Russian charged by Mueller in relation to the election interference operation had been detained. In addition to the IRA indictments, Mueller’s investigation also led to the charging of 12 Russian intelligence officers accused of hacking email accounts linked to the Democratic Party and then releasing them online. U.S. officials have said they believe there is little chance any of the Russians charged under Mueller will ever face a U.S. courtroom. Russia has refused to make any of those charged available to U.S. investigators.

Her detention in Belarus, however, seems to have been short. On Tuesday, Russia’s embassy in Minsk said that Bogacheva had already told its embassy staff that she was free.

 Belarus’s Prosecutor General’s Office on Tuesday told the news agency Interfax-West that it had submitted a request to Interpol asking it to potentially remove her from its international wanted list on its territory. It said it had found “no basis” for holding Bogacheva with the goal of extraditing her abroad, Dmitry Brylev, the prosecutor office’s spokesperson told Interfax.

“Yes, they detained her. Today she was released,” Brylev said.

Malkevich, who first announced her detention, wrote on his account on the messenger service Telegram that according to his sources Bogacheva was already on her way back to Russia. Malkevich wrote on social media that according to his sources Bogacheva had been detained “by Interpol at the request of the U.S.” in relation to the election meddling in 2016.

Bogacheva’s detention in Belarus raised eyebrows, since President Alexander Lukashenko is almost uniquely close to Russia. Russia’s invasion of Crimea and disputes over energy, however, have caused tensions recently between Minsk and Moscow, and Lukashenko has appeared to seek better relations with Europe and the United States. Last month, he hosted the White House’s then-National Security Adviser John Bolton.

Arresting and then extraditing Bogacheva would almost certainly have provoked a major diplomatic row with Russia, which has always denied it had sought to influence the 2016 election.

Russian officials reacted angrily to the news of Bogacheva’s detention.

“It is not clear to any sane person in Russia why Belarus, our fraternal republic with which we are building the Union State, behaves in this way,” Viktor Vodolatsky, a member of Russia’s parliamentary committee on the Community of Independent States Affairs, told the state news agency RIA Novosti.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 15 Oct 2019

Family of UK teen killed in crash involving US diplomat’s wife coming to White House

WORLD NEWS Family of UK teen killed in crash involving US diplomat's wife coming to White House  https://linewsradio.com/family-of-uk-teen-killed-in-crash-involving-us-diplomats-wife-coming-to-white-house/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

ABC News(WASHINGTON) —  The family of Harry Dunn, a British teenager killed when the wife of an American diplomat crashed into his motorcycle in August, is coming to the White House Tuesday for a meeting with “senior administration officials,” according to a White House official.

The White House stopped short of saying that the President Donald Trump would meet the family.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson called on Trump to intervene in the case after it created an uproar there after the diplomat’s wife left the country apparently claiming diplomatic immunity.

President Trump spoke out about the incident last week, calling it a “terrible accident” and expressed interest in trying to broker some sort of meeting or healing but also acknowledged that it’s a “very complex issue” due to diplomatic immunity.

“We are trying to work something out,” said Trump, adding that the administration wanted to speak to the American woman, Anne Sacoolas, involved in the accident.

“We’re going to speak to her and see what we can come up with so that there can be some healing. There’s tremendous anger over it. It’s a terrible incident. There’s tremendous anger, and I understand the anger from the other side very much,” Trump said.

While the president said he understands the anger from the perspective of those in the U.K., he has also expressed understanding of the confusion that can occur when driving in a country where the laws are different — saying “it happens.”

 “I understand where the people from the U.K. are. And, frankly, a lot of Americans feel the same way. We have — I was telling Boris, we have a lot of Americans that, you know, they side on the fact that, you know, you have two wonderful parents that lost their son, and the woman was driving on the wrong side of the road. And that can happen,” Trump said. “When you get used to driving on our system and then you’re all of a sudden in the other system, where you’re driving — it happens.”

ABC News has reached out to Dunn’s family for comment.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 15 Oct 2019

Man arrested in 1993 cold case rape after he’s identified by DNA: Police

U.S. NEWS Man arrested in 1993 cold case rape after he's identified by DNA: Police https://linewsradio.com/man-arrested-in-1993-cold-case-rape-after-hes-identified-by-dna-police/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/national-news/

Newark Police Department(NEWARK, Del.) — Twenty-six years after a young woman was sexually assaulted in the middle of the night in Delaware, a man unknown to police at the time has been arrested after DNA evidence linked him to the scene.

It was just after 2:30 a.m. on Aug. 4, 1993, when a 22-year-old woman walking near the University of Delaware in Newark was attacked and sexually assaulted, Newark police said at a Tuesday news conference.

A composite sketch was released and witnesses were interviewed, but no suspects were identified, police said.

The man taken into custody this month, Jeffrey King, hadn’t been named as a potential suspect at the time, police said.

The case went cold for decades. It was reopened in November 2017.

The sexual assault kit was sent to a private lab where male DNA was identified, police said. That DNA was entered into the law enforcement database CODIS, but there wasn’t a match.

The DNA was then sent to the DNA company Parabon Nanolabs, where analysts compared the unknown crime scene sample to “samples in various databases, including a public genealogy website with DNA samples, to provide a list of possible suspects,” police said. On genealogy websites, many people upload DNA to connect with relatives and explore family histories.

That list of possible suspects was then narrowed down, said police, and King was one name on that list provided by Parabon.

In August detectives surveilled King and collected a discarded item, which was sent to a lab where it was determined that King’s DNA was consistent with that from the 1993 crime, police said.

King, now 54, was 28 years old at the time of the assault, police said. The victim and suspect were strangers, Delaware Attorney General Kathy Jennings said.

On Sept. 30, a grand jury indicted King for two counts of unlawful sexual intercourse, which is what the charge was called in 1993. That charge has since been changed to rape, police added.

King, of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, turned himself into Newark police on Oct. 10 and has since posted bail, police said. He is scheduled to be arraigned on Friday. No attorney is listed for him.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 15 Oct 2019

What happens when people are given $500 a month? A California city experiments with guaranteed income

U.S. NEWS What happens when people are given $500 a month? A California city experiments with guaranteed income https://linewsradio.com/what-happens-when-people-are-given-500-a-month-a-california-city-experiments-with-guaranteed-income/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/national-news/

Heidi Gutman/Walt Disney Television(STOCKTON, Calif.) —  For Falaviena Palefau, being able to buy her 12-year-old daughter new shoes for her birthday was a present for both of them.

Normally, when the date rolled around, Palefau said she’d deflect her daughter’s birthday wishes, telling the girl they could ask her grandparents for money or save up for a while to get it.

But this time was different.

The unemployed mom is one of 125 people getting $500 a month — no strings attached — in a privately-funded experimental guaranteed income program in Stockton, California, a city of more than 300,000, where 1-in-4 residents lives in poverty.

Guaranteed income programs, which are similar to universal basic income programs such as the one espoused by Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang but limited in scope, are seen as a potential solution to addressing economic inequality and injustice.

“Universal basic income is an income support mechanism typically intended to reach all (or a very large portion of the population) with no (or minimal) conditions,” according to a scholarly article on the International Monetary Fund’s website.

 The idea is that by giving money to people who need it, they’ll be able spend it and improve their lives in the moment in situations that may not be covered by traditional benefit programs.

“Though the existing benefits systems target people’s most essential needs, unconditional cash meets people’s most urgent needs,” the discussion paper on the Stockton Economic Empowerment Demonstration says. “Sometimes people require more than food, housing, and medical insurance – they need a new car battery to get to work the next day, or they need cash to pay an unanticipated bill that might otherwise trigger a downward spiral.”

For Palefau, 30, her priorities were utility bills and debts she’d accrued. Another was getting her driver’s license, something she kept “putting off to the side because there’s more important things.”

She also noticed that the guaranteed income, dispensed via ATM card halfway through the month, really helped at the end of the month, when her food stamps often ran out and she and her two children might have to visit a local food bank.

“Being able to provide for my kids … for me, that’s a really big deal,” Palefau told ABC News.

So were her daughter’s shoes.

“She asked to get a pair of shoes that she wanted for some time now,” Palefau said, referring to her daughter. “It felt so good to give her the money and go get it.”

Stacia Martin-West, an assistant professor in the College of Social Work at the University of Tennessee, is one of the co-principal investigators involved in the Stockton program. She said most people were using the money for food and bills.

Five months into the program, which began in February, the data showed that food — about 40% of the total — was the biggest expenditure. Next was sales and merchandise at 24%, though Martin-West noted that some of that figure probably includes food spending since Walmart is one of the area’s largest food stores. Rounding out the top three spending areas was utility bills, at 11%.

 “A lot of folks think that they know how lower- and moderate-income people spend money,” Martin-West said, but this data shows that they “make smart and rational decisions like we all do.”

Amy Castro Baker, Martin-West’s co-principal investigator and an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice, said social researchers have long known that biases against the spending habits of lower income individuals are unjustified.

“People who are living on the margins of the economy tend to be the savviest budgeters because they have to stretch their money the farthest,” Castro Baker told ABC News.

Recipients for the Stockton experiment were randomly chosen from a neighborhood where the median income was at or below the city’s median of $46,033.

The concept of a universal basic income was thrust into the national conversation during the course of the Democratic primaries as Yang made it a centerpiece of his campaign.

His program — the Freedom Dividend — would pay all Americans over the age of 18 $1,000 a month “no questions asked.” Yang says the program would be funded by “consolidating some welfare programs and implementing a Value Added Tax of 10 percent” on the production of goods and services. Yang is paying 10 families and three individuals $1,000 per month for a year as part of a case study.

“I think that Andrew has absolutely vaulted this to a much bigger platform than it had before,” said Annie Lowrey, a journalist and the author of the book “Give People Money: How a Universal Basic Income Would End Poverty, Revolutionize Work, and Remake the World.”

Opponents of UBI or guaranteed income programs often cite cost and efficiency, arguing that those who are not in the lowest subset of earners would not need the subsidy, according to a scholarly article published on the International Monetary Fund’s website.

SEED’s website counters that the payments as “a hand up, rather than a hand out.” “SEED seeks to empower its recipients financially and to prove to supporters and skeptics alike that poverty results from a lack of cash, not character,” the group’s discussion paper says.

Support for universal basic income varies among countries.

A recent Gallup-Northeastern University survey found that 43% of Americans support a universal basic income program, though that pales in comparison to the 75% of Canadian adults and 77% of adults in the United Kingdom who support similar measures. The age group with the highest level of support in the U.S. was respondents between the ages of 18 and 29 years old.

“Gaps in support for UBI among the three countries surveyed may be due to the tradition of more robust social safety nets in the U.K. and Canada than in the U.S.,” the survey said.

Lowrey said that while she “would be surprised” if the U.S. ever adopted “a true” UBI, which would mean “giving literally everybody cash unconditionally and permanently,” she said that more politicians and economists are discussing “more cash-based policies” to address economic inequalities.

She pointed to proposals like Sen. Kamala Harris’ LIFT the Middle Class Act, a tax credit to middle-class and working families, or suggestions to eliminate work requirements tied to the Earned Income Tax Credit as examples of policies that are similar philosophically to guaranteed income.

Lowrey told ABC News it seems “really likely” that “UBI-like” programs will be “part of the policy conversation going forward.”

“What you are seeing in Stockton is that this model that seems really radical is in fact quite viable and maybe even reasonable to do,” Lowrey said.

Stockton mayor Michael Tubbs said his residents have been extremely supportive of the program.

He added that “every day we get emails, tweets, Instagram messages” from people asking to be included in the program. “It’s just heartbreaking.”

Tubbs said he’s been advising city officials in Chicago and Newark, as part of their respective basic income task forces, and believes programs offering guaranteed income would work elsewhere — if governments step in to support them.

“Philanthropy can’t be policy,” he told ABC News, adding that for it to work at scale, “it has to be done at a statewide or national level.”

The Stockton program is slated for 18 months, ending in July 2020.

Palefau said she hopes she’ll be able to use excess money from future months to make restitution payments in a decade-old incident, and to help her get closer to her goal of either working at, or running her own daycare.

In the meantime, she said she’s enjoying being able to buy food and pay bills with less worry.

“It was stressful” before the program started, she said. “It’s been a lot of weight off my shoulders.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 15 Oct 2019

Giuliani says he won’t comply with a congressional subpoena

Political News Giuliani says he won't comply with a congressional subpoena https://linewsradio.com/giuliani-says-he-wont-comply-with-a-congressional-subpoena/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/politics-news/

Luka Banda/iStock(WASHINGTON) —  President Donald’s Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani told ABC News on Tuesday he is not complying with a congressional subpoena.

Giuliani tells ABC News “if they enforce it then we will see what happens.”

Giuliani went on to tell ABC News he is no longer retaining the services of Jon Sale, who was acting as his attorney for this matter. Giuliani says that if Congress seeks to enforce a subpoena then he will retain counsel.

As part of his final acts as his attorney, Sale sent a letter to Congress on Tuesday replying to the subpoena Giuliani was sent.

Tuesday was the deadline for Giuliani to comply with a wide-ranging subpoena from three of the House committees working on the growing impeachment inquiry into President Trump.

In their subpoena sent to Giuliani late last month, Reps. Adam Schiff, Jerry Nadler and Elijah Cummings said that Giuliani had “admitted on national television that, while serving as the president’s personal attorney, he asked the government of Ukraine to target former Vice President Joe Biden.”

“A growing public record indicates that the President, his agent Rudy Giuliani, and others appear to have pressed the Ukrainian government to pursue two politically-motivated investigations,” the chairmen wrote. “The Committees have reason to believe that you have information and documents relevant to these matters.”

Giuliani had previously told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos that he would “consider” cooperating with the congressional request but only if his client, President Trump, signed off.

“I’m a lawyer. It’s his privilege, not mine,” Giuliani told ABC News last month. “If he decides that he wants me to testify, of course I’ll testify, even though I think Adam Schiff is an illegitimate chairman. He has already prejudged the case.”

Giuliani has emerged as a central figure in the inquiry. Citing recent testimony by witnesses, Democrats accuse Giuliani of running a shadow foreign policy operation to benefit the Trump campaign. Two Ukrainian-American businessmen who reportedly helped Giuliani to investigate Trump’s political rival, Joe Biden, and Biden’s son, Hunter, were indicted last week on campaign finance charges.

Guiliani’s business relationships remain the subject of an ongoing criminal investigation being conducted by federal authorities in New York.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 15 Oct 2019

Pence, Giuliani defy demands by Congress for documents

Political News Pence, Giuliani defy demands by Congress for documents https://linewsradio.com/pence-giuliani-defy-demands-by-congress-for-documents/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/politics-news/

Luka Banda/iStock(WASHINGTON) —  Declaring the Democratic-led impeachment inquiry illegitimate, Vice President Mike Pence and President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani on Tuesday refused to hand over documents on Ukraine.

The Defense Department and White House’s Office of Management and Budget also declined to comply with the investigation, defying congressional subpoenas, officials said.

The move dramatically escalates the standoff between the Democratic-led House and the White House, which also has told administration officials not to testify and has otherwise stonewalled Congress.

“If they enforce it, then we will see what happens,” Giuliani said of his congressional subpoena.

 Trump and his supporters say the inquiry isn’t legitimate because House Speaker Nancy Pelosi initiated impeachment without a formal vote. They note that in the cases of Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton, the House held initial votes on whether to proceed.

Democrats have insisted that a vote isn’t necessary for an inquiry ahead of more formal impeachment proceedings. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday stood by that decision, at least for now, telling reporters that Republicans couldn’t defend Trump so they were attacking the process.

Rep. Adam Schiff, the Democratic chairman of the Intelligence Committee, said the House would stay focused on gathering information.

“The evidence of obstruction of Congress continues to mount,” he told reporters. “We are nonetheless continuing to get good and important information from witnesses.”

 While Giuliani was given a wide-ranging subpoena by Democrats, Pence’s office was asked to provide Congress with certain documents.

In a statement released late Tuesday, Pence’s office said it would only cooperate if Congress returned to the “regular order of legitimate legislative oversight requests.”

 “Until that time, the Office of the Vice President will continue to reserve all rights and privileges that may apply, including those protecting executive privileges, national security, attorney-client communications, deliberations, and communications among the President, the Vice President, and their advisors,” Pence’s office stated.

The House is investigating a whistleblower complaint that Trump pressed Ukraine to investigate his political rival Joe Biden and Biden’s son. Giuliani has emerged as a central figure in the inquiry, pressing repeatedly a discredited theory that corrupt Ukrainian politicians meddled in the 2016 elections and were trying to help Democrat Hillary Clinton.

U.S. intelligence officials say it was Russia, not Ukraine, that orchestrated election interference and in favor of Trump, not Clinton.

Pence and Giuliani also have defended the push for Ukraine to investigate the Bidens. In an interview with ABC News, Hunter Biden denied any wrongdoing by engaging in foreign work but acknowledged “poor judgement” by failing to take into account his father’s position as vice president.

Tuesday was the deadline for Giuliani to comply with a wide-ranging subpoena from three of the House committees working on the impeachment inquiry.

“A growing public record indicates that the President, his agent Rudy Giuliani, and others appear to have pressed the Ukrainian government to pursue two politically-motivated investigations,” the Democratic chairmen wrote. “The Committees have reason to believe that you have information and documents relevant to these matters.”

Giuliani had previously told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos that he would “consider” cooperating with the congressional request but only if his client — the president — signed off.

“I’m a lawyer. It’s his privilege, not mine,” Giuliani told ABC News last month. “If he decides that he wants me to testify, of course I’ll testify, even though I think Adam Schiff is an illegitimate chairman. He has already prejudged the case.”

Separately, Giuliani said Tuesday that he is no longer retaining the services of Jon Sale, who was acting as his attorney for this matter. Giuliani said that if Congress seeks to enforce a subpoena, then he will retain counsel.

As part of his final acts as his attorney, Sale sent a letter to Congress on Tuesday replying to the subpoena Giuliani was sent.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 15 Oct 2019

Giuliani digs into debunked Ukraine conspiracy theory after report Bolton called him a ‘hand grenade’

Political News Giuliani digs into debunked Ukraine conspiracy theory after report Bolton called him a 'hand grenade' https://linewsradio.com/giuliani-digs-into-debunked-ukraine-conspiracy-theory-after-report-bolton-called-him-a-hand-grenade/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/politics-news/

sborisov/iStock(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani pushed back Tuesday against reports that Trump’s then-national security adviser John Bolton once referred to him as a “hand grenade,” insisting that others at the White House didn’t have the “evidence” he did of “Ukrainian collusion.”

Giuliani’s statement provided to reporters suggests the former mayor of New York and longtime Trump supporter isn’t backing down on his discredited claims that Ukrainian politicians tried to interfere in the 2016 election in favor of Democrat Hillary Clinton. U.S. intelligence agencies and officials have repeatedly said the concerted effort to meddle in the election came from Russia, not Ukraine, and favored Trump, not Clinton.

Citing recent testimony by witnesses, Democrats accuse Giuliani of running a shadow foreign policy operation to benefit the Trump campaign. Two Ukrainian-American businessmen who reportedly helped Giuliani to investigate Trump’s political rival, Joe Biden, and Biden’s son, Hunter, were indicted last week on campaign finance charges.

In testimony Monday on Capitol Hill, Trump’s former Russia adviser Fiona Hill quoted Bolton as saying that “Giuliani’s a hand grenade who’s going to blow everybody up,” according to The New York Times.

In a statement provided to ABC News on Tuesday, Giuliani said he was “disappointed” in Bolton for reportedly casting doubt on his claims.

“I’m not sure he realizes I received all this evidence as part of my representation of the President,” he said. “It was all part of the evidence, and suppression of evidence, involving Ukrainian collusion and the origin of some of the false information against the President.”

Last month, Trump’s former homeland security adviser Tom Bossert lashed out at Giuliani for promoting what he said was a “completely false” theory regarding Ukraine’s alleged interference in the 2016 election.

“At this point I am deeply frustrated with what [Giuliani] and the legal team is doing and repeating that debunked theory to the president,” Bossert, now an ABC contributor, said.

Giuliani has emerged as a central figure in the impeachment inquiry on whether Trump pushed Ukraine’s president to investigate his political rivals.

House lawmakers were hearing from a top State Department official on Tuesday, with other key witnesses – including Trump mega donor and hotelier-turned-diplomat Gordon Sondland — scheduled to testify under subpoena on Thursday.

Guiliani’s business relationships remain the subject of an ongoing criminal investigation being conducted by federal authorities in New York.

Giuliani has acknowledged earning $500,000 for work he did with Lev Parnas, one of the two Ukrainian American businessman who were arrested last week and charged with campaign finance charges.

Giuliani told ABC News that he was retained by Parnas’ business “Fraud Guarantee” to do consulting work and insisted that any money he took came from domestic, not foreign sources.

Reached by ABC News, a spokesperson for Bolton, who left his post in September, declined to comment.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 15 Oct 2019

‘Grease’ spin-off ‘Rydell High’ headed to HBO Max; Olivia Newton John’s ‘Grease’ get-up goes on the auction block

Entertainment News  'Grease' spin-off 'Rydell High' headed to HBO Max; Olivia Newton John's 'Grease' get-up goes on the auction block https://linewsradio.com/grease-spin-off-rydell-high-headed-to-hbo-max-olivia-newton-johns-grease-get-up-goes-on-the-auction-block/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

HBO Max(NEW YORK) — Grease, the 1978 movie musical starring John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, is getting a 1950s-set spin-off for HBO Max called Grease: Rydell High.

“It’s Grease 2.0 but with the same spirit, energy and excitement you immediately think of when you hear any of these iconic songs,” says Sarah Aubrey, head of content at HBO Max in a statement. “Grease is an iconic pop-culture phenomenon that works for every generation, and I’m thrilled that our friends at Paramount were excited about the idea of opening up the show and putting it on a larger canvas for a weekly series.”

WarnerMedia Entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt described the series as, “basically a High Shcool Musical  kind of experience that will be a big fun rock and roll musical.”

Rydell High will center on the same school that Travolta’s Danny and Olivia Newton-John’s Sandy attended, but will focus on new characters — though the producers say “some familiar characters” will appear.
 
On a related note, Newton-John’s famous black leather jacket and skin-tight pants worn in the blockbuster film, as well as an original script from the film, will hit the auction block tomorrow, along with pieces from the Grammy winner’s video for “Physical,” and her film Xanadu, all benefiting the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Wellness & Research Centre.

Some of the pieces, nearly 500 in her collection, will be displayed Wednesday at the Hard Rock Cafe in New York’s Times Square. 

Check out the offerings at Julien’s Auctions.com.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 15 Oct 2019

Alfre Woodard says she’s ready to do more comedies: “Just send me the scripts”

Entertainment News  Alfre Woodard says she's ready to do more comedies: "Just send me the scripts" https://linewsradio.com/alfre-woodard-says-shes-ready-to-do-more-comedies-just-send-me-the-scripts/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

ABC Audio(NEW YORK) — Ahead of her Apple TV+ drama series, See, co-starring Jason Momoa, Alfre Woodard is reflecting on another one of her dramas: her Netflix film Juanita.

The film followed Woodard as the titular character, a woman who tries to reinvent herself after she gets fed up with taking care of her grown children.  Even though it was a drama, Juanita provided Woodard with a way to flex her comedic skills, an opportunity which the actress tells ABC Audio she readily welcomed.

She laughs, “My husband wrote that for me. Because he… knows me. He and my children know me and yeah… Juanita and I, we definitely could go to Bella Noche.”  Bella Noche is the bar Juanita frequents in the movie.

The film, which came out in March, is based on a book by Sheila Williams called Dancing on the Edge of the Roof. Woodard, who also served as an executive producer on the film, says she definitely interested in getting more projects that allow her to show her humorous side on screen.

“I am a literate person, so if anybody’s got great books like Sheila Williams, then, you know, talk to me about them,” she says. “You want to see me– if you want me to make you laugh, I will.  Just send me the script.” 

Meanwhile, See will be available on Apple TV+ on November 1. Juanita is currently streaming on Netflix.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 15 Oct 2019