Penn State fraternity suspended after 17-year-old’s mysterious death

iStock(UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa.) — Officials at Penn State University suspended the Chi Phi fraternity on Tuesday after a teenager was found dead in an off-campus house reportedly occupied by frat members.

The Alpha Delta chapter of the Chi Phi fraternity was placed under an interim suspension as the school investigates the mysterious death of a 17-year-old male who was found dead while visiting the school on Saturday, university officials said.

The teen, identified by the coroner’s office as John Schoenig, was discovered unresponsive at an off-campus house in State College, Pennsylvania. The school said the house is reportedly occupied by Chi Phi members, but it’s not its official frat house.

“Penn State offers deepest sympathies to the family and friends of this young man,” the school said in a statement. “State College Police and the University’s Office of Student Conduct are investigating. However, Penn State has issued an interim suspension of the Alpha Delta Chapter of Chi Phi fraternity, a member of the Interfraternity Council, until more information is known.”

The interim suspension means the fraternity loses all privileges as a recognized student organization pending the outcome of the investigations, according to the statement. It will also be barred from attending or planning events as an organization.

Officers with the State College Police Department there were no signs of trauma on the victim and several witnesses were present when he began experiencing shallow breathing before losing consciousness, according to police.

He was in “full cardiac arrest” by the time officers arrived, police said in a statement.

“Resuscitation efforts were unsuccessful, and the victim was pronounced dead at the scene,” the statement said. “We are urging anyone who may have information regarding this incident to contact the State College Police Department at (814) 234-7150, by email or submit an anonymous tip through our website.”

The Cathedral Preparatory School, a private school located in Erie, Pennsylvania, said Schoenig was a senior and hockey player there who went by the name Jack.

“Please pray for the Prep-Villa community as we mourn the passing of our brother, John ‘Jack’ Schoenig ’20,” the school said in a statement Monday. “We ask that you please keep Jack’s family & friends in your prayers during this difficult time.”

Cathedral Prep Varsity Hockey Coach, Alex Luddy, told local reporters that his “lively” and “energetic” personality would be missed dearly.

“He was an energetic and passionate hockey player, on the ice he played aggressively he had the ability to bring a spark to the team whenever he stepped on the ice,” Luddy told Erie News Now. “Whatever he would do, he had the ability with one single play to be able to change the game because the players reacted to him, he had a personality that was very lively, very energetic, he was very emotional and passionate, the other guys fed off of him.”

Police said the Centre County Coroner’s Office is scheduled to conduct an autopsy. It did not provide a timeline.

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Posted On 22 Oct 2019

Houston Astros apologize after Sports Illustrated describes ‘frightening’ outburst toward female reporters by executive

iStock(NEW YORK) — The Houston Astros have issued an apology after one of its executives reportedly made a “frightening” outburst toward three female reporters while celebrating the team making it to the World Series.

The controversy surrounded closer Roberto Osuna, who the Astros acquired from the Toronto Blue Jays last season while he was under a 75-game suspension for domestic violence, per Major League Baseball’s policy on domestic violence.

On Saturday, after the Astros clinched the ALCS in Game 6 against the New York Yankees, assistant general manager Brandon Taubman reportedly turned toward the group of female reporters in the clubhouse and said several times, “Thank God we got Osuna! I’m so f—— glad we got Osuna!” Sports Illustrated reported. One of the reporters was wearing a purple domestic violence bracelet, and Taubman’s comments were so “offensive and frightening” that another Astros staffer apologized to the women, according to the outlet.

The comments were even more puzzling considering that Osuna had been “the least valuable” Astros player that game, Sports Illustrated reported.

The Astros initially defended Taubman, describing the Sports Illustrated story in a statement as “misleading and completely irresponsible,” stating that the comments were “not directed toward any specific reporters” and accusing Sports Illustrated of fabricating “a story where one does not exist.”

“An Astros player was being asked questions about a difficult outing. Our executive was supporting the player during a difficult time,” the statement, released on Monday, read, although the Houston Chronicle reported that there were no players in the area and no interviews being conducted at the time. “His comments had everything to do about the game situation that just occurred and nothing else.”

On Tuesday, Taubman released a statement admitting to using “inappropriate language” for which he is “deeply sorry and embarrassed.”

“In retrospect, I realize that my comments were unprofessional and inappropriate,” he said. “My overexuberance in support of a player has been misinterpreted as a demonstration of a regressive attitude about an important social issue. Those that know me know that I am a progressive and charitable member of the community, and a loving and committed husband and father. I hope that those who do not know me understand that the Sports Illustrated article does not reflect who I am or my values. I am sorry if anyone was offended by my actions.”

The Sports Illustrated column accuses Taubman’s comments as illustrating MLB’s “forgive and forget” attitude toward domestic violence.

The allegations against Osuna, 24, stem from a May 2018 incident in which he allegedly assaulted the mother of his child, but the charges were dropped after she returned to Mexico and declined to testify, ESPN reported. As part of a peace bond, Osuna agreed to counseling and to not have any contact with the woman.

In August 2018, Astros General Manager Jeff Luhnow said in a statement that while the situation “weighed heavily” on their decision to sign Osuna, they “felt that Roberto deserved a second chance” after evaluating “the entirety of information.”

“This is the miscalculation that teams make over and over again,” the Sports Illustrated column read. “They acquire players with reprehensible pasts for less than market rate and concede that they will have to pay a price in public trust. But when the bill comes due, teams act like they, not the people their actions wounded, are the aggrieved party.”

Astros owner and Chairman Jim Crane said in a statement Tuesday that the team continues “to be committed to using our voice to create awareness and support on the issue of domestic violence.”

“We not only ensure mandatory training annually for all our employees, we also have created an important partnership with the Texas Council on Family Violence, and have raised over $300K through our initiatives to help various agencies providing important support for this cause,” Crane said. “We fully support MLB and baseball’s stance and values regarding domestic violence.”

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Posted On 22 Oct 2019

Newt Gingrich weighs in on Trump comparing impeachment to ‘lynching’: He ‘uses words more clumsily than he should’

iStock(NEW YORK) — Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich seemed to defend President Donald Trump on The View on Tuesday hours after the president compared the impeachment process against him to a “lynching.”

Trump took to Twitter on Tuesday morning to voice his disapproval of the impeachment inquiry, writing: “So some day, if a Democrat becomes President and the Republicans win the House, even by a tiny margin, they can impeach the President, without due process or fairness or any legal rights. All Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here – a lynching. But we will WIN!”

While guest co-hosting for The View, Gingrich spoke about the tweet.

“It’s exactly the same term that Clarence Thomas used,” Gingrich said, referring to the Supreme Court justice’s response to Anita Hill’s accusations of sexual harassment against Thomas in 1991, in which he complained the questioning during his nomination process was “high-tech lynching for uppity blacks.”

“[Trump was] beaten out for over two years with the Mueller thing,” Gingrich continued. “You start to relax. All of a sudden there’s this whole new wave of things, and I think part of what you have is a guy here who’s just really deeply frustrated that no matter where he turns, you know, the fight keeps going on.”

After calling Trump a “very important historic figure,” Gingrich noted that “there are things that he does that make it all harder” for him to be in office.

“If he were more disciplined, he would actually have a much easier road than he does,” Gingrich said. “He sort of chews up his own road as he goes down it.”

Sunny Hostin grilled Gingrich about the racial connotation that comes with the term “lynching” and asked if he thought it was racially charged to use the word. Gingrich began his response by saying it was going to be “very politically incorrect.”

“Most of the early American movies on lynching were about lynching white people,” Gingrich said. “One of the largest lynching’s of the 19th century was Italians. So, there is a tradition here. It’s not only about black experience.”

When Whoopi Goldberg followed up on the question, asking if it was necessary for the term to be used at all, Gingrich said “it wasn’t.” Trump, he said, “often uses words more clumsily than he should.”

“I’ve been comfortable just calling it a witch hunt and a kangaroo court and things like that,” Gingrich said of the impeachment inquiry into Trump. “I haven’t gone up to that next level.”

Gingrich, a Republican from Georgia, served as speaker of the House from 1995 to 1999, during which he successfully helped lead Republican efforts to impeach then-President Bill Clinton.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi launched an official impeachment inquiry into President Trump in September. As someone who’s been down the road to impeachment, Gingrich was asked by Abby Huntsman to share his thoughts about how the process is being handled.

“I think had Speaker Pelosi referred the Ukrainian phone call to a special counsel, they could do a lot of things,” he said. “Today, the White House doesn’t have a lawyer in these hearings. Secretary [Mike] Pompeo has staff going into a hearing, has no lawyer there, has no idea what they’re saying.”

Gingrich concluded that he wouldn’t take the same steps Pelosi has made in the impeachment inquiry so far because Pelosi “has no referral that says [Trump’s] guilty of anything.” He said she isn’t “following rules that are fair” as to “allow the person being accused to face their accuser.” Whistleblowers are protected by law against retaliation for lawfully filing a complaint for wrongdoing.

Pelosi and Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff defended their impeachment probe on Oct. 15.

“I’m not concerned about anything,” Pelosi said. Republicans “can’t defend the president so they’re going to process.”

“We’re not here to call bluffs. We’re here to find the truth,” she added. “This is not a game for us. This is deadly serious.”

Editor’s Note: This article has been updated to include the correct quote from Justice Clarence Thomas, which was misquoted by Newt Gingrich.

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Posted On 22 Oct 2019

New Jersey school district bans students with lunch debt from participating in extracurricular activities

iStock(CHERRY HILL, N.J.) — A New Jersey school district is banning students with school lunch debt from attending extracurricular activities, including prom and field trips.

The Cherry Hill school district passed a policy that prohibits high school students who owe $75 or more in meal payments from “participating in extracurricular activities, purchasing tickets for school dances including proms, attending class trips including the Senior Trip, and purchasing a yearbook,” according to a detailed outline of the policy.

Middle school students who owe $75 or more in school lunch fees will face the same punishment, while elementary school students will be barred from participating in after-school events and attending class trips.

The policy, which was approved last Tuesday at a board of education meeting, received swift backlash from parents and students.

Video of the board meeting, which was posted to the district’s website, showed students, teachers and parents addressing the board to condemn the policy.

Dr. Vibiana Cvetkovic, whose grandchildren attend schools in the district, said at the meeting, “there are many reasons why parents can’t pay. It is an elitist assumption on the part of this school board that parents are not paying a bill because they don’t want to.”

Jacob Graff, a senior at Cherry Hill East, said, “If my mom or dad can’t pay for lunch, why should I be restricted from my passions?”

“What are colleges gonna think?” he asked the board, noting how important extracurricular activities are on applications.

The school district had $14,343 in unpaid meal debt in the last school year from more than 300 students who had a debt of more than $10, according to NJ.com.

Superintendent Dr. Joseph Meloche said at the meeting the district’s goal is “responsibility with compassion.”

He urged those criticizing the policy to take note that it does not include a state statute, which would require meals to be withheld from students who owe lunch money.

“Money is certainly something that we have to deal with. That’s our world, but that’s not the most important thing that we’re addressing in terms of the policy and the work that’s being done,” Meloche said. “It’s about supporting children and supporting families … sometimes the right thing is not the easy thing to do.”

Multiple calls to the school district were not returned.

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Posted On 22 Oct 2019

Colorado mom accused of murdering 7-year-old daughter whom she claimed was terminally ill

iStock(GLENDALE, Colo.) — A Colorado woman who claimed her 7-year-old daughter died of a terminal illness two years ago has now been accused of her murder.

Kelly Renee Turner, who also goes by Kelly Renee Gant, was arrested at a hotel in Glendale, Colorado, on Friday after a grand jury returned a 13-count indictment against her for the 2017 death of her daughter, Olivia Gant. Turner is facing multiple felony and misdemeanor charges, including first-degree murder, child abuse and charitable fraud, according to court documents obtained by ABC News.

Turner, 41, was booked into the Douglas County Detention Facility in Castle Rock, Colorado. She made her first court appearance Monday and is being held without bond pending her next one, which is scheduled for Nov. 1. Turner’s public defender declined to comment on the case.

The grand jury indictment was the culmination of a yearlong investigation by the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office in Colorado, which began after Olivia’s primary care doctor became suspicious about Turner’s claims that her other daughter had been treated for childhood d in Texas. The doctor soon confirmed with Texas hospitals that the child was never diagnosed with nor treated for cancer of any type, which then prompted concerns about Olivia’s death and care as well, according to the indictment.

“I am extremely proud and impressed with the determination of all agencies involved, especially my detectives,” Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock said in a statement on Monday. “While it has been an extremely emotional case, they have investigated all aspects of it with diligence and professionalism.”

The investigation was initiated by doctors at Children’s Hospital Colorado along with the Jefferson County Department of Human Services. A redacted Human Services report, which was cited in the indictment, expressed concern that Turner “has lied about the children’s medical conditions and therefore may have caused harm to the children and or caused them to have significant medical procedures.” The report said there was also concern that Turner “may have been benefiting from this attention” and “has a financial and social motivation for her children’s medical conditions, both real and fictitious.”

A spokesperson for Children’s Hospital Colorado declined to comment on the case Tuesday, saying, “At this point we do not want to compromise any active legal matters.”

After moving from Texas to Colorado, Turner first took Olivia to Children’s Hospital in 2013 with concerns of developmental delays. The little girl, who was just 2 years old at the time, was ultimately diagnosed with autism, according to the indictment.

Olivia then began seeing doctors for constipation, which eventually got worse. When Olivia started getting sick, Turner reported that her daughter was having severe pain related to eating. Olivia was ultimately put on a feeding tube and then an intravenous line known as Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN), according to the indictment.

Turner was told that her daughter would not be able to sustain feeding on IV nutrition and was given the option to take Olivia home on hospice. The little girl died at Denver Hospice a few weeks later, according to the indictment.

Turner had set up a GoFundMe account to help with some of Olivia’s medical expenses that she claimed weren’t covered by their family’s health insurance nor Medicaid. The crowdfunding campaign raised $22,270 from 161 donors in two years, according to the indictment.

Before she died in August 2017, Olivia was featured on local and national news as she checked off items on her bucket list, which included helping Denver police officers bust “bad guys.” Turner had told media outlets covering Olivia’s story that her daughter was terminally ill with neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, a rare disease that the mother claimed had caused her young daughter to suffer intestinal failure.

But multiple doctors who had treated Olivia over the years told detectives that the little girl was not terminally ill, according to court documents.

A general pediatric surgeon, who performed Olivia’s feeding tube, ileostomy and central line surgeries, described Turner as a “high maintenance mother” who “wasn’t afraid of surgery,” according to the indictment.

A pediatric neurologist who treated Olivia for reports of seizures said the little girl didn’t have them and told Turner on three separate occasions over two years to stop giving her anti-epileptic drugs, according to the indictment.

A pediatric gastrointestinal doctor and clinician said all of Olivia’s medical history and symptoms came from Turner, and that the little girl did not exhibit the symptoms her mother described most of the time. The doctor said he was against “letting Turner take Olivia to hospice care to die,” according to the indictment.

Another gastroenterologist, who said he managed Olivia’s TPN when she received it, said he and other medical staff members had discussions with Turner about reducing her daughter’s dependency on the intravenous line but the mother refused, stating, “We’ve already tried that,” according to the indictment.

A pediatric anesthesiologist said he treated Olivia for the symptoms that Turner reported were causing her daughter “a lot of pain.” He said Turner insisted that her daughter’s IV nutrition and medical care be withdrawn because she had a life-limiting disease and her quality of life was poor. The clinic’s ethics team pushed back but ultimately decided to let Turner withdrawn the TPN line, according to the indictment.

Olivia’s remains were exhumed in November 2018 and a complete autopsy was performed by Dr. Kelly Lear, a pathologist who is also Colorado’s Arapahoe County Coroner. Lear noted a lack of any anatomical findings that would account for Olivia’s stated cause of death, intestinal failure, as well as many of the conditions Turner claimed she suffered from, according to the indictment.

“Based on the lack of anatomic findings to account for her chronic intestinal failure, nonspecific toxicology results, and the inability to exclude caregiver-fabricated illness, the manner of death is best certified as undetermined,” Lear stated in a 14-page report, as cited in the indictment.

Last year, a detective spoke with Turner who allegedly admitted to fabricating her other daughter’s cancer diagnosis but maintained that Olivia’s medical conditions were completely legitimate. Turner allegedly told the detective that doctors had agreed Olivia was only receiving 30% of her daily nutritional requirement via the TPN line and that they signed off on the hospice admission paperwork, according to the indictment.

Turner, unsolicited, also allegedly brought up Munchausen by proxy syndrome, telling the detective, “That has never been my case, like at all, whatsoever. You can talk to anyone that stood by my side,” according to the indictment. Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a relatively rare psychological disorder in which a caregiver exaggerates or makes up symptoms of the individual in their care.

A caseworker with the Douglas County Department of Human Services conducted a separation test last October to see whether Turner’s other daughter would have medical issues when her mother wasn’t present. The girl has not had any additional health problems or complaints of pain since then, according to the indictment.

Turner has not yet entered a plea in the case.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 22 Oct 2019

California residents bracing for possibility of more blackouts due to high winds

iStock(SAN FRANCISCO) — Hundreds of thousands of Northern California residents are bracing for another round of widespread, deliberate blackouts after Pacific Gas and Electric Co. said it may need to proactively shut off power due to high winds.

The power company’s emergency operations center has been monitoring a dry, offshore wind event and may turn off power lines starting late Wednesday evening, PG&E said in a statement. About 209,000 customers, in 15 counties in the Sierra Foothills and the North Bay, likely would be affected by the blackouts, expected to extend more than 48 hours.

The announcement drew angry reactions from residents, ABC San Francisco station KGO-AM reported.

“What PG&E is supposed to be doing is taking the billions of dollars we have been giving them and trimming the trees and taking care of the grid so we don’t have to do shutoffs in the first place,” Mark Toney, executive director of The Utility Reform Network, a San Francisco-based consumer advocacy organization, told KGO-AM.

Heavy wind gusts caused more than 100 instances of serious damage and hazard on PG&E’s distribution and transmission lines during the last public safety power shutoff, or PSPS, event earlier this month, which afffected more than 2 million people.

The deadly Saddleridge Fire in Los Angeles County ignited on Oct. 10 near an electrical transmission line operated by Southern California Edison in Los Angeles’ northernmost neighborhood of Slymar. While the company shut down some of its power lines, the transmission line running through Sylmar had not been de-energized.

“The sole purpose of PSPS is to significantly reduce catastrophic wildfire risk to our customers and communities,” PG&E officials said in a statement. “We know that sustained winds above 45 mph are known to cause damage to the lower-voltage distribution system and winds above 50 mph are known to cause damage to higher-voltage transmission equipment.”

PG&E spokeswoman Tamar Sarkissian told KGO-AM that the power company is trying to fix the mistakes made in the last blackout by coordinating more efficiently with state and local officials. The company is also installing devices to divide the grid into smaller segments so blackouts will be targeted to smaller areas.

Sonoma County First District Supervisor Susan Gorin told KGO-AM that PG&E should have started undergrounding lines and segmenting the transmission grids, as they have been doing in Southern California, “decades ago.”

“Where have they been?” Gorin asked.

On Friday, PG&E President and CEO Bill Johnson said the goal is to eliminate PSPS events within the next 10 years while speaking before the California Public Utilities Commission.

“It will take us some time to do that,” Johnson said.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 22 Oct 2019

Tennis champion Maria Sharapova on her path to entrepreneurship and overcoming career setbacks

iStock(NEW YORK) — When she was 6 years old, Maria Sharapova moved with her father from Sochi, Russia, to Florida to train with tennis professionals and see if she could turn her dream into a reality.

“I had this incredible focus of hitting this yellow fuzzy ball endlessly and I think the one quality that really stood out was that I was just able to do it repetitively and I was able to focus and concentrate,” Sharapova told ABC News’ Rebecca Jarvis on an episode of No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis podcast.

Sharapova has made quite a name for herself on and off the court: she won Wimbledon at age 17, has been ranked No. 1 in the world by the World Tennis Association five separate times, is a New York Times bestselling author and started her own candy line, Sugarpova.

“We came to America with only $700, and while he (her father) was trying to find ways to make money, I was at the big sporting academy in Florida just getting better and improving,” Sharapova said, reflecting on her early days in the United States. “I didn’t know the language so I learned that very fast by being around so many children.”

Sharapova said part of the reason she founded Sugarpova is because of a shoulder injury she thought would end her tennis career.

Sugarpova is a candy line consisting of chocolates, gummies, gumballs and truffles inspired by Sharapova’s childhood, when she would reward herself after practice with a lollipop or chocolate treat. All Sugarpova candies are made from natural, non-GMO ingredients and can be found in stores across the country.

“I recognized that tennis would not last forever, and I think as you have this one thing going on in your life and this one career path it’s as if you’re never going to make shifts and turns and I recognized at that time that, wow, I don’t know if I’m going to ever come back from the shoulder injury and at the time it was like I want to take all the experience that I’ve had in business and I want to apply it to Sugarpova,” Sharapova said.

After years of partnering with brands and being the face of various advertising campaigns, Sharapova was ready to take what she had learned from those experiences and apply them.

“I actually didn’t say I think I can do this. It was more like I think I want to be a little more competitive with this,” Sharapova said about starting Sugarpova. “I want to be the one that’s making more decisions, better decisions that can maybe benefit me in the long run.”

She began creating the line’s bags and logo that is seen around the world today.

In the interview, Sharapova also touched on failing a drug test because of a medication she had been taking for health reasons, causing her to be banned from tennis for 15 months.

“It was such an interesting time in my career because it’s also a time that I was considering maybe stepping down from the sport and thinking a little bit about family and business and it kind of prolonged my career in a way of when I did get back I viewed the sport in a very different way,” Sharapova said. “It was a blessing and opened my eyes to what I had achieved and the amount of people that respected what I did.”

While taking some time off to re-evaluate her future, Sharapova focused on Sugarpova and studied management and leadership at Harvard to gain business skills.

“I worked on Sugarpova consistently,” Sharapova said. “I was investing in a few different businesses so I had time and then I got to spend the holidays at home which was such a treat for me.”

Sharapova’s tennis career is still going strong, and she continues to push forward in the world of entrepreneurship, launching Sugarpova in stores across the globe and serving as a guest judge on season 11 of Shark Tank.

“In sports we can be seen as heroic, but at the end of the day we’re also very open to being vulnerable and entrepreneurship should be the same way, there’s no reason to hide the tough moments,” she said. “I think that’s part of the scars that help you grow.”

Hear more from Maria Sharapova on episode #134 of No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 22 Oct 2019

John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John reuniting for screenings at special “Meet-and-Grease” events

MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) — Danny and Sandy are getting back together. Grease co-stars John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John will reunite for three special “Meet-and-Grease” movie events in December.

All three of the screenings and subsequent question-and-answer panels starring the pair will take place in Florida. First up is West Palm Beach on December 13.  Tampa hosts the following day, and Jacksonville on December 15.

The stars of the 1978 musical blockbuster announced the events on their Instagram accounts Tuesday. “Dress up, sing-a-long with the film, and join Olivia and I for a special Q&A,” Travolta teased.

Last year, the pair reunited for an event commemorating the 40th anniversary of the classic film.

Tickets go on sale at Ticketmaster.com this Friday.

 

 

 

Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 22 Oct 2019

1 Brexit deal passes Parliament but another critical timing vote fails

iStock(LONDON) — A proposed deal that could lead to the United Kingdom leaving the European Union (EU) passed a critical vote in Parliament on Tuesday, but was followed by another vote that failed, suggesting it might not met the required deadline for Brexit to happen.

The first vote Tuesday evening was on the Withdrawal Agreement Bill and there were 329 members who voted in favor of the bill, with 299 against.

Debates on the deal started earlier Tuesday after the deal was first published Monday. The lengthy document details a package of laws required to be put in place to help allow the U.K.’s retreat from the EU to happen.

The agreement is upwards of 110 pages long and details the deal reached between the EU and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson last week.

The second vote that was held Tuesday night was related to the timeline of the further passage of the bill, and that vote failed, meaning that some of the members who voted in favor of the bill voted against the proposed three days they were being given to evaluate and amend the bill.

The second vote failed by a margin of 308 to 322. Those who voted against the timetable complained that the three-day timetable would not be long enough to evaluate such a complicated and lengthy bill.

The move comes as Johnson and his supporters, who are in favor of Brexit, push to take action before an Oct. 31 deadline.

The House of Commons held the votes on Tuesday, and any final version approved by the House of Commons will eventually need to be sent to the Parliament’s upper chamber, the House of Lords, before it is final.

The battle over Brexit has been raging on for years at this point, with various deals being voted down at the hands of both former Prime Minister Theresa May and current Prime Minister Johnson.

Tuesday’s vote is a step towards the possible separation, but the timeline of further votes this week remains critical to determining whether or not the final deal will be reached by the Oct. 31 deadline.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

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Posted On 22 Oct 2019