Trump visits shooting victims in Dayton, El Paso, but mostly stays out of public view

Political News Trump visits shooting victims in Dayton, El Paso, but mostly stays out of public view https://linewsradio.com/trump-visits-shooting-victims-in-dayton-el-paso-but-mostly-stays-out-of-public-view/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/politics-news/rss.xml

tupungato/iStock(WASHINGTON) — After calling for unity and healing as two American cities mourn the loss of thirty one murdered people, President Donald Trump lashed out at his critics on Twitter and while visiting first responders.

The president said he had “an amazing day” traveling to El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio to offer condolences to victims, meet with local leaders and thank first responders for their heroism. The president and first lady visited Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton, Ohio, and in Texas, the University Medical Center of El Paso and the Emergency Operations Center.

 Trump spent most of the day out of public view as he met with people during stops in Ohio and Texas. But on Twitter and during brief remarks in El Paso, the president focused his attention on critics and scolded Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley for remarks they made during a press conference after he’d left.

“They shouldn’t be politicking today,” Trump said, when asked why he attacked people on a day that he said should be without politics.

“I get on Air Force One, where they do have a lot of televisions, and I turn on the television and there they are saying, ‘well I don’t know if it was appropriate for the president to be here,’ etc. etc., same old line,” Trump said, with some of El Paso’s first responders standing beside him.

“They’re very dishonest people and that’s probably why he got zero percent and failed as a presidential candidate,” Trump said of Brown.

As the president criss-crossed the country aboard Air Force One to act as “consoler in chief,” the president and his aides sent a series of scathing tweets attacking Brown and Whaley for mischaracterizing their experiences inside Dayton’s hospital. However both Brown and Whaley thanked the president for coming to their grieving city. The president also criticized Joe Biden for a speech he made in Iowa and offered a critique on Fox News’ daily programming.

In brief remarks in El Paso, Trump praised the work of the first responders and noted he was impressed by the “love and respect for the office of the presidency.”

Then, in the emergency operations center with law enforcement, the president said he has been struck by “all the love” he had seen.

The president spent time shaking hands and greeting law enforcement — some of them who were the very first to respond to calls at the Walmart where 22 people died.

“All over the world they’re talking about the job that you have done as police, as law enforcement, as first responders,” Trump said. “I wanted to come and thank you because you’re very special people.”

 Earlier in Dayton, Trump and first lady Melania Trump were greeted by a mix of supporters and protesters along the motorcade route from the airport and outside Dayton’s Miami Valley Hospital. White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham tweeted that the president and first lady met with wounded victims and family members at the hospital and were “stopping between rooms to thank the hardworking medical staff.”

“You had God watching,” Grisham said Trump said while at the hospital. “I want you to know we’re with you all the way.”

Trump made no other stops in Dayton, although a number of officials, including the city’s mayor, Nan Whaley, greeted him when he landed.

 Asked earlier in the day, as he left the White House, about criticism of his divisive rhetoric on race and immigration, the president insisted “my rhetoric brings people together.”

“I do think we have toned it down,” he told reporters.

At the same time, Trump repeated conservative media reports focused on the Dayton shooter’s self-description as “leftist” on a Twitter account believed to be his, although law enforcement authorities have said they do not believe his political views appear to be a significant motive for the Dayton attack.

“This person supported Bernie Sanders, Antifa and Elizabeth Warren I understand — nothing to do with President Trump,” he said, speaking to reporters on the White House South Lawn, referring to two of the 2020 Democratic candidates and the left-wing, anti-fascist group.

 Most of the posts on the shooter’s social media accounts indicate left-leaning politics. Two of these posts were in support of Elizabeth Warren and one also expresses support of Bernie Sanders, amid other posts that were anti-white supremacist and pro-immigration.

But law enforcement authorities have said they can’t say yet what the Dayton shooter’s motive was and experts analyzing his social media posts told ABC News his political views do not so far appear to be the reason for his attack. Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl said on Tuesday that “while we do not have true clarity on the motive of the assailant,” evidence has revealed the gunman had a “history of obsessions with violent ideations” and that he “expressed the desire” to commit a mass shooting.

In fact, the shooter demonstrated a variety of hatreds, and his misogyny actually jumped out to investigators as being far more extreme than his political expressions, two officials briefed on the Dayton investigation told ABC News.

 “These are people looking for political gain,” Trump said referring to his critics, Sanders and Warren being among the harshest. “As much as possible I try to stay out of that.”

“They’re trying to make political points,” Trump said. “I would like to stay out of the political fray.”

“I don’t blame Elizabeth Warren and I don’t blame Bernie Sanders. I don’t blame anybody — I blame — these are sick people. These are people that are really mentally ill, mentally disturbed. It’s a mental problem,” the president said, talking about the gunmen.

Asked about the threat of white supremacy, Trump said, “I am very concerned about the rise of any group of hate. I don’t like it, any group of hate, whether it’s white supremacy, whether it’s any other kind of supremacy, with it’s Antifa — I am very concerned about it and I’ll do something about it.”

 Asked about gun control efforts, Trump said he’s “looking to do background checks … they’re important,” claiming there’s “great appetite for background checks.”

“I’ll be convincing some people to do things that they don’t want to do … I have a lot of influence with a lot of people and I want to convince them to do the right thing … we’ve made a lot of headway in the last three days,” he said, apparently referring to consultations with GOP congressional leaders as he and they face pressure to act in the face of the latest shootings.

At the same time, Trump appeared to downplay any effort to restrict or ban assault weapons or high-capacity ammunition magazines of the kinds used in the shootings, saying there’s “great appetite to do something to make sure that mentally unstable, seriously ill people aren’t carrying guns … I have not seen it in regard to certain types of weapons.”

Ahead of his visits, the president spent Tuesday preparing for his encounters with the grieving communities, according to a White House official. But some questioned the presence of the president, whose rhetoric, they say, encouraged the shooters and has fanned the flames of division.

 White House counselor Kellyanne Conway said the president travels to “heal communities” by meeting with the injured, survivors, local law enforcement and medical professionals. In what has become routine for modern presidents, Trump visited victims and local law enforcement in the aftermath of mass shootings like Parkland, Florida, and Pittsburgh. But in El Paso — a border city with a large Latino population — some residents questioned why the president would visit.

“Why would he want to come? That would be my first — I know he’s our president, but he has promoted a lot of this — all this anger. He has promoted it across the nation and it needs to stop, it needs to stop,” Bill Aguirre, a veteran and El Paso native told ABC News.

El Paso County Commissioner David Stout told ABC News Senior Washington Reporter Devin Dwyer on “The Briefing Room” Tuesday that there’s “a gaping wound that’s still open here” and that a lot of people feel that Trump’s presence in the community is “just going to be throwing salt in an open wound.”

 Rep. Veronica Escobar, D-Texas, said on MSNBC Monday that Trump “is not welcome” in El Paso. “He should not come here while we are in mourning.”

On Twitter Tuesday, she also posted a thread about how she declined the president’s invitation to join him during his visit to El Paso and said she requested a phone call with him instead.

 However, El Paso Mayor Dee Margo said he would welcome Trump, “as he is president of the United States.”

“So in that capacity, I will fulfill my obligations as mayor of El Paso to meet with the president and discuss whatever our needs are in this community and hope that if we are expressing specifics that we can get him to come through for us,” Margo said.

Stephanie Whiddon, who recently moved to El Paso from Indiana, was not opposed to the visit and said it could be a learning opportunity.

“He should come, he should see what we’re going through. The pain that this community is feeling right now, the pain that their families are suffering. He needs to be a part of that.”

 In her comments on Monday, Escobar specifically pointed to the president’s language when she said Trump wasn’t welcome.

“Words have consequences. And the president has made my community and my people the enemy. He has told the country that we are people to be feared, people to be hated. He has done that at his rallies, he has done that through his Twitter,” Escobar said. “And so I would ask his staff and his team to consider the fact that his words and his actions have played a role in this.”

The El Paso shooting suspect allegedly said he wanted to target as many Mexicans as he could in his deadly rampage at a Walmart, and used white nationalist rhetoric. In a speech at the White House on Monday, the president condemned hate speech and white nationalism that was hailed by the suspect in El Paso.

But the Dayton mayor said his comments on Monday fell short of unifying.

“I’m disappointed with his remarks. I think they fell really short. He mentioned gun issues one time. I think watching the president over the past few years on issues of guns, he has been — I don’t know if he knows what he believes, frankly,” Whaley said.

On Tuesday, she told reporters that she planned to tell Trump “how unhelpful he’s been” with regard to his comments about how to tackle gun violence, but deflected when she was asked if she thought the president was visiting Dayton too soon after the shootings.

“He’s the president of the United States. He does his calendar, I do mine,” she said.

Later, she said, “I will welcome him in the official capacity as mayor since he is in the office of the president.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Aug 2019

US, Turkey agree to deal on Syria safe zone for refugees as new report warns of ISIS resurgence

WORLD NEWS US, Turkey agree to deal on Syria safe zone for refugees as new report warns of ISIS resurgence  https://linewsradio.com/us-turkey-agree-to-deal-on-syria-safe-zone-for-refugees-as-new-report-warns-of-isis-resurgence/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/rss.xml

Racide/iStock(WASHINGTON) — The U.S. and Turkey reached an agreement on Wednesday to create a safe zone in northeastern Syria in order to secure the territory once held by the Islamic State.

The deal was reached days after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan warned that the Turkish military was about to launch an assault on U.S.-backed Kurdish forces in Syria, who were integral to the battlefield success against the terror group.

While U.S. officials warned that offensive could have risked upending the gains made against ISIS or freed thousands of ISIS fighters held by Kurdish forces, the Pentagon issued a fresh warning that the terror group is re-surging in Syria.

Turkish and American military officials had been meeting in Ankara for several days when they reached the deal on Wednesday. They agreed to set up a joint operations center, based in Turkey, to oversee a safe zone in northeastern Syria, according to similar statements from the U.S. embassy in Turkey and the Turkish Defense Ministry.

A U.S. defense official confirmed to ABC News that the two countries reached the agreement to address Turkey’s security concerns, but declined to provide details.

Turkey considers the U.S.-armed and backed Syrian Democratic Forces to be a terrorist organization because their ranks are mostly comprised of Kurds. Those Kurdish soldiers served as de facto U.S. ground forces in Syria in the fight against ISIS, but some members have ties to a Kurdish group across the border in Turkey known as the Kurdistan Workers’ Party or PKK — an organization the U.S. and Turkey consider a terrorist group.

Turkish military forces had been increasing deployments along the Turkish side of the border in recent weeks — including heavy weaponry, tanks and artillery — in readiness for the attack. The U.S. has consistently said Turkey has legitimate security concerns because of those connections, but President Donald Trump and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo have signaled that they will not allow Turkey to harm the Kurdish forces that supported their counter-ISIS mission.

The deal reached on Wednesday has averted that crisis, for now. The U.S. and Turkey had previously reached agreements to conduct joint patrols in nearby areas, but Turkey has criticized the U.S. for slow-walking measures to counter what it sees as an existential threat, with Erdogan saying on Monday that it was Turkey’s “top priority” to “eliminate” this “cancer cell.”

The safe zone will also “become a peace corridor, and every effort shall be made so that displaced Syrians can return to their country,” according to the U.S. embassy. Turkey hosts 3.6 million Syrian refugees, according to the U.N. refugee agency, and political pressure has been growing on Erdogan to begin sending Syrians back across the border.

While the agreement seems to lay the groundwork for those repatriations to begin, the conditions in this area remain desperate. Months after the last ISIS town fell, a new Pentagon inspector general report released on Tuesday described “ongoing lawlessness and violence.”

Areas liberated from ISIS and now run by civilian councils affiliated with the SDF, still struggle with offering basic services, such as water, medical care and removing rubble. They’re also having difficulty destroying mines and other explosives, and eliminating cells of ISIS fighters, which continue to conduct attacks. Those issues have been exacerbated by the withdrawal of some U.S. troops and all U.S. diplomats, according to the Pentagon report.

“The reduction of U.S. forces has decreased the support available for Syrian partner forces at a time when their forces need more training and equipping to respond to the ISIS resurgence,” the report said.

In particular, the drawdown of U.S. troops has come as the SDF have requested more training and assistance in rooting out ISIS cells and is struggling to maintain ad hoc prisons with some 10,000 ISIS fighters behind bars, 2,000 of whom are not from Iraq or Syria.

With a diminished U.S. military presence, the administration was able to secure added troop commitments from the United Kingdom and France, a U.S. official told ABC News last month.

The State Department also pulled out all of its personnel when Trump first announced he was withdrawing all troops from Syria last December. While those teams are scheduled to head back into the country, they have not yet, undermining for months now the stabilization projects that U.S. officials have said are critical to keeping ISIS away. The administration also cut all funding for those projects and asked partner countries to step in instead, raising $325 million, but leaving their future in jeopardy, too.

The U.S. has “a significant way to go if we are to ensure our military gains are accompanied and cemented by a robust stabilization response,” a State Department inspector general report found last month.

But the department’s chief doesn’t think so.

“We’re doing all the right things,” Pompeo said on Wednesday. “I’m sure it’s the case that there’s pockets where they’ve become a little stronger. I can assure you there are places where it’s become weaker as well.”

Among the most pressing challenges now, according to the Pentagon report, is what to do with the 70,000 displaced persons who have been detained fleeing ISIS, 50,000 of whom are under the age of 18. There is a growing threat that some of them will be radicalized and recruited by ISIS, but the U.S. lacks the capacity to monitor the humanitarian situation in the camps, according to the report.

Beyond those potential new targets, the terror group still has between 14,000 and 18,000 fighters between Iraq and Syria, per the report, although firm numbers are very difficult to come by.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Aug 2019

Terry Crews and ‘Fast and Furious’ series star Ludacris tapped to star in modern adaption of ‘John Henry’

Entertainment News  Terry Crews and 'Fast and Furious' series star Ludacris tapped to star in modern adaption of 'John Henry' https://linewsradio.com/terry-crews-and-fast-and-furious-series-star-ludacris-tapped-to-star-in-modern-adaption-of-john-henry/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/rss.xml

 

ABC/Paula Lobo(LOS ANGELES) — Terry Crews has been tapped to put a modern twist on the classic African-American folk tale John Henry.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Saban Films has picked up the North American rights to a contemporary adaptation of John Henry that will star Crews and rapper-actor Ludacris.

In the original folk tale, Henry was a steel driver worker who was so strong that he was able to beat a steam-powered rock-drilling machine. Although he won, his victory was bittersweet: His heart gave out and he died as the competition ended.

But in the film, set in modern times, Crews will play John Henry as a man who leaves his “crime-riddled life for a peaceful one in Los Angeles.” But Henry soon encounters two immigrant kids who are on the run from a gang leader and Henry must help save them.

Crews’ John Henry film follows last October’s news that Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson was set to play the folk hero in a new Netflix film titled John Henry and the Statesman.

Although official details on The Rock’s film have yet to be revealed, he teased that the film would “highlight John’s “values, strength, morals and heart, all matter today more than ever.”

John Henry is set to hit theaters in the first quarter of 2020. Meanwhile, John Henry and the Statesman, directed by Jake Kasdan, does not yet have a release date.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Aug 2019

Dayton mayor meets with Trump after earlier criticism

Political News Dayton mayor meets with Trump after earlier criticism https://linewsradio.com/dayton-mayor-meets-with-trump-after-earlier-criticism/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/politics-news/rss.xml

ABCNews.com(DAYTON, Ohio) — Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley met with President Trump Wednesday and kept her promise to give him a piece of her mind.

The president visited Ohio days after the deadly shooting in Dayton’s downtown that left nine dead and dozens of others injured.

Leading up to his visit, Whaley said she planned to tell him “how unhelpful he’s been” on the issue of gun reform.

Whaley greeted the president and first lady Melania Trump when they landed at the airport and visited a hospital with them and other officials where some of the injured were being treated.

After the hospital visit, Whaley spoke to reporters alongside Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown.

“I pointed out to the president that now-governor, former senator, Mike DeWine voted for the assault weapons ban,” Whaley said, seeming to suggest that “if there was a time that this was bipartisan,” that time could be now.

“We’re looking for those people in Congress to come together because the majority of Americans agree, so this should be in action,” she said.

“Do I think that we’re going to see another mass shooting tomorrow or Friday? Probably, because Washington will not move,” she said.

As for the response of the people on the ground to Trump’s visit, Whaley seemed to carefully avoid mentioning Trump by name, saying, “I think the victims and the first responders were grateful that the President of the United States came today.”

She agreed with Brown when he said that Trump “was comforting and he did the right things and Melania did the right things.”

“He was very nice,” Whaley said.

She also said she supported his team’s decision to skip a visit to the site of the shooting.

“I think it was a good decision for him not to stop in the Oregon District,” she said.

“A lot of the time his talk can be very divisive and that’s the last thing we need in Dayton,” Whaley said.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Aug 2019

Former Michigan State dean sentenced to prison for ‘neglect of duty’ in Larry Nassar abuse

Sports News Former Michigan State dean sentenced to prison for 'neglect of duty' in Larry Nassar abuse https://linewsradio.com/former-michigan-state-dean-sentenced-to-prison-for-neglect-of-duty-in-larry-nassar-abuse/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/sports-news/rss.xml

Bet_Noire/iStock(EAST LANSING, Mich.) — A former Michigan State University (MSU) dean has been sentenced for his role in not doing more to protect students from abuse by disgraced doctor Larry Nassar.

Ingham County Circuit Court Judge Joyce Draganchuk sentenced William Strampel, 71, to a maximum of one year in prison on Wednesday after he was found guilty of criminal misconduct in office and two counts of willful neglect of duty.

“You’re guilty of two counts of neglect of duty for not properly overseeing Larry Nassar once you decided that you would be the one to do that,” Draganchuk said. “I am not prepared to say that 42 or 45 people suffered harm because of your actions. They suffered harm at the hand of Larry Nassar, but I am also not prepared to say that nobody suffered harm because of your actions.”

Strampel was the first MSU official to be convicted as part of the Michigan attorney general’s investigation into the school and its handling of Nassar, according to the Lansing State Journal. He had initially been charged in March 2018, after serving as dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine from 2002 to December 2017.

“Today’s sentencing sends a resoundingly clear message to public officials: If you brandish your power to demean, insult, harass, objectify, and abuse women, you will be held accountable,” Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel said in a statement. “We appreciate the court’s decision and commitment to ensuring justice in this case was served. While Mr. Strampel’s sentence will never give back the years of pain and suffering his victims had to endure, the persistence of these courageous survivors made certain that he could no longer hide behind the title he once held to escape the reach of justice.”

In 2014, a student filed a Title IX complaint against Nassar, who was then working at the university in addition to his work with USA Gymnastics and other gymnastics programs. That investigation found no evidence of misconduct — a conclusion now known to be extremely incorrect, as dozens of women testified Nassar abused them, including at the university.

After the investigation, Nassar was ordered by the school to follow certain protocols while treating students, and Strampel was supposed to be supervising him, according to prosecutors. Prosecutors argued that Strampel failed to properly do so. Nassar was fired by MSU in September 2016.

The former dean was found guilty not just of neglect of duty for failing to adequately supervise Nassar, but also of criminal misconduct in office for sexually harassing female medical students. However, he was not found guilty of a second-degree criminal sexual conduct charge, related to allegedly groping a student during a 2014 scholarship event, per the Lansing State Journal.

“They all came to you, not because they needed your friendship or they just thought you would be a good person to talk to, but they came to you because they needed your professional discretion and judgement in order to advance academically,” Draganchuk said Wednesday.

That Strampel would not give students a clear answer on if he thought they could cut it in medical school, the judge said, “tells us that you derived some sort of satisfaction using your position as the dean to manipulate and oppress these female students and that is more than sexual harassment, that’s more than inappropriate, that’s more than unfiltered locker room talk, that’s misconduct in office, a felony.”

Two other former MSU employees have been charged by the state attorney general’s office, including gymnastics coach Kathy Klages — for lying about her knowledge of complaints about Nassar — and former university president Lou Anna Simon — for lying to the police. Those cases are still ongoing. Nassar will spend the rest of his life imprisoned for molesting patients and possessing child pornography.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Aug 2019

Hotel visitor contracts Legionnaires’ and dies

Sean Pavone/iStock(ATLANTA) — One person has died from the Legionnaires’ disease outbreak at the Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, according to the Georgia Department of Public Health.

Cameo Garrett, one of the 12 lab-confirmed cases of the disease, died of coronary artery atherosclerosis aggravated by Legionella in July, the medical examiner’s office in DeKalb County confirmed to ABC News.

There are now 61 probable cases of Legionnaires’ disease among the people who stayed at or visited the Sheraton, the Georgia Department of Public health said in a statement.

The hotel has since closed and will remain closed until at least August 11, according to the general manager of the Sheraton Atlanta, Ken Peduzzi.

“Sheraton Atlanta continues to work closely with public health officials and environmental experts to determine if the hotel is the source of the outbreak,” Peduzzi said. “The health and safety of our employees and guests is our top priority.”

The Georgia Department of Public Health (GDPH) and the Fulton County Board of Health will both oversee safety testing and sampling being conducted by out an outside contractor, according to a GDPH spokesperson.

Legionnaires is a disease that causes severe lung inflammation and is usually caused by infection. It is often contracted by people inhaling the bacteria.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Trump visits shooting victims in Dayton but stays out of public, news media view

Political News Trump visits shooting victims in Dayton but stays out of public, news media view https://linewsradio.com/trump-visits-shooting-victims-in-dayton-but-stays-out-of-public-news-media-view/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/politics-news/rss.xml

tupungato/iStock(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday visited Dayton, Ohio, where the White House said he met with victims of a weekend shooting that left nine dead but stayed almost completely out of view of the public and news media before departing for El Paso, Texas, where 22 people were killed in a mass shooting Saturday.

Trump and first lady Melania Trump were greeted by a mix of supporters and protesters along his motorcade route from the airport and outside Dayton’s Miami Valley Hospital. White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham tweeted that the president and first lady met with wounded victims and family members at the hospital and were “stopping between rooms to thank the hardworking medical staff.”

“You had God watching,” Grisham said Trump said while at the hospital. “I want you to know we’re with you all the way.”

Trump made no other stops in Dayton, although a number of officials, including the city’s mayor, Nan Whaley, greeted him when he landed.

Asked earlier as he left the White House about criticism of his divisive rhetoric on race and immigration, the president insisted “my rhetoric brings people together.”

“I do think we have toned it down,” he told reporters.

At the same time, Trump repeated conservative media reports focused on the Dayton shooter’s self-description as “leftist” on a Twitter account believed to be his, although law enforcement authorities have said at this point they do not believe his political views appear to be a significant motive for the Dayton attack.

“This person supported Bernie Sanders, Antifa and Elizabeth Warren I understand — nothing to do with President Trump,” he said, speaking to reporters on the White House South Lawn, referring to two of the 2020 Democratic candidates and the left-wing, anti-fascist group.

He repeated his assertion that the Dayton shooter was “a fan of Antifa, a fan of Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. Nothing to do with Trump, but nobody ever mentions that,” he said.

Most of the posts on the shooter’s social media accounts indicate left-leaning politics. Two of these posts were in support of Elizabeth Warren and one also expresses support of Bernie Sanders, amid other posts that were anti-white supremacist and pro-immigration.

But law enforcement authorities have said they can’t say yet what the Dayton shooter’s motive was and experts analyzing his social media posts told ABC News his political views do not so far appear to be the reason for his attack. Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl said on Tuesday that “while we do not have true clarity on the motive of the assailant,” evidence has revealed the gunman had a “history of obsessions with violent ideations” and that he “expressed the desire” to commit a mass shooting.

In fact, the shooter demonstrated a variety of hatreds, and his misogyny actually jumped out to investigators as being far more extreme than his political expressions, two officials briefed on the Dayton investigation told ABC News.

“These are people looking for political gain,” Trump said referring to his critics, Sanders and Warren being among the harshest. “As much as possible I try to stay out of that.”

“They’re trying to make political points,” Trump said. “I would like to stay out of the political fray.”

“I don’t blame Elizabeth Warren and I don’t blame Bernie Sanders. I don’t blame anybody — I blame — these are sick people. These are people that are really mentally ill, mentally disturbed. It’s a mental problem,” the president said, talking about the gunmen.

Asked about the threat of white supremacy, Trump said, “I am very concerned about the rise of any group of hate. I don’t like it, any group of hate, whether it’s white supremacy, whether it’s any other kind of supremacy, with it’s Antifa — I am very concerned about it and I’ll do something about it.”

 Asked about gun control efforts, Trump said he’s “looking to do background checks … they’re important,” claiming there’s “great appetite for background checks.”

“I’ll be convincing some people to do things that they don’t want to do … I have a lot of influence with a lot of people and I want to convince them to do the right thing … we’ve made a lot of headway in the last three days,” he said, apparently referring to consultations with GOP congressional leaders as he and they face pressure to act in the face of the latest shootings.

At the same time, Trump appeared to downplay any effort to restrict or ban assault weapons or high-capacity ammunition magazines of the kinds used in the shootings, saying there’s “great appetite to do something to make sure that mentally unstable, seriously ill people aren’t carrying guns … I have not seen it in regard to certain types of weapons.”

Ahead of the Ohio and Texas visits, the White House said the president would offer his condolences to victims, meet with leaders and talk about his plans to combat the scourge of gun violence in the United States. Trump, who had an empty public schedule on Tuesday, spent the day preparing for his encounters with the grieving communities, according to a White House official. But some are questioning the presence of the president, whose rhetoric, they say, encouraged the shooters and has fanned the flames of division.

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway said the president travels to “heal communities” by meeting with the injured, survivors, local law enforcement and medical professionals. In what has become routine for modern presidents, Trump visited victims and local law enforcement in the aftermath of mass shootings like Parkland, Florida, and Pittsburgh. But in El Paso — a border city with a large Latino population — some residents questioned why the president would visit.

 “Why would he want to come? That would be my first — I know he’s our president, but he has promoted a lot of this — all this anger. He has promoted it across the nation and it needs to stop, it needs to stop,” Bill Aguirre, a veteran and El Paso native told ABC News.

El Paso County Commissioner David Stout told ABC News Senior Washington Reporter Devin Dwyer on “The Briefing Room” Tuesday that there’s “a gaping wound that’s still open here” and that a lot of people feel that Trump’s presence in the community is “just going to be throwing salt in an open wound.”

Rep. Veronica Escobar, D-Texas, said on MSNBC Monday that Trump “is not welcome” in El Paso. “He should not come here while we are in mourning.”

On Twitter Tuesday, she also posted a thread about how she declined the president’s invitation to join him during his visit to El Paso and said she requested a phone call with him instead.

However, El Paso Mayor Dee Margo said he would welcome Trump, “as he is president of the United States.”

“So in that capacity, I will fulfill my obligations as mayor of El Paso to meet with the president and discuss whatever our needs are in this community and hope that if we are expressing specifics that we can get him to come through for us,” Margo said.

Stephanie Whiddon, who recently moved to El Paso from Indiana, was not opposed to the visit and said it could be a learning opportunity.

“He should come, he should see what we’re going through. The pain that this community is feeling right now, the pain that their families are suffering. He needs to be a part of that.”

 In her comments on Monday, Escobar specifically pointed to the president’s language when she said Trump wasn’t welcome.

“Words have consequences. And the president has made my community and my people the enemy. He has told the country that we are people to be feared, people to be hated. He has done that at his rallies, he has done that through his Twitter,” Escobar said. “And so I would ask his staff and his team to consider the fact that his words and his actions have played a role in this.”

The El Paso shooting suspect allegedly said he wanted to target as many Mexicans as he could in his deadly rampage at a Walmart, and used white nationalist rhetoric. In a speech at the White House on Monday, the president condemned hate speech and white nationalism that was hailed by the suspect in El Paso.

But Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley said his comments on Monday fell short of unifying.

“I’m disappointed with his remarks. I think they fell really short. He mentioned gun issues one time. I think watching the president over the past few years on issues of guns, he has been — I don’t know if he knows what he believes, frankly,” Whaley said.

On Tuesday, she told reporters that she planned to tell Trump “how unhelpful he’s been” with regard to his comments about how to tackle gun violence, but deflected when she was asked if she thought the president was visiting Dayton too soon after the shootings.

“He’s the president of the United States. He does his calendar, I do mine,” she said.

Later, she said, “I will welcome him in the official capacity as mayor since he is in the office of the president.”

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Posted On 07 Aug 2019

Bodies found in Canada believed to be teen suspects wanted for multiple murders, police say

WORLD NEWS Bodies found in Canada believed to be teen suspects wanted for multiple murders, police say  https://linewsradio.com/bodies-found-in-canada-believed-to-be-teen-suspects-wanted-for-multiple-murders-police-say/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/rss.xml

Royal Canadian Mounted Police(TORONTO) — Two bodies found in Canada are believed to be of the two teen suspects wanted for multiple murders, officials said at a press conference on Wednesday.

“At 10am this morning, Manitoba RCMP officers located the bodies of two males, believed to be the BC suspects, near the shoreline of the Nelson River (approx 8km from the burnt vehicle),” the Royal Canadian Mounted Police said in a statement on Twitter.

“The search is over,” officials said.

Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, were wanted on Canada-wide warrants for second-degree murder in connection with the death of a man whose body was found along a highway near Dease Lake in northwest Canada on July 19.

The teens’ truck camper was found in flames about 1.2 miles away from the body, identified as 64-year-old Leonard Dyck of Vancouver, according to police.

The teens, both Canadian, were also considered suspects in the shooting deaths of 24-year-old American Chynna Deese and her 23-year-old Australian boyfriend, Lucas Fowler, whose bodies were discovered July 15 along a highway near Liard Hot Springs, also in northwest Canada.

Canadian police had sent divers into a river over the weekend to search for signs of two teenage boys and discovered “several items” along the bank of the Nelson River, as well as a damaged aluminum boat, while conducting a helicopter search over Canada’s northeast Manitoba province on Friday afternoon. Those items, which police confirmed are “directly linked to the suspects,” were located six miles from where a burning vehicle belonging to the teens was found two weeks ago, police said.

After the discovery, “specialized RCMP teams begin searching nearby high-probability areas, leading officers to the discovery of the two male bodies, in the dense brush, within 1 km from where the items were found,” police said.

Autopsies will be conducted to officially identify the remains.

The teens’ families hadn’t heard from them in weeks, police said.

The last confirmed sighting of the fugitives occurred near Gillam on July 22, just before authorities discovered a car on fire in a remote area. Police later confirmed that the burning vehicle was the same one McLeod and Schmegelsky were last known to be travelling in.

Gillam, a riverside community of just over 1,200 people, is some 2,000 miles east of where the three bodies were found last month.

After a week of exhaustive ground and air search efforts of the dense forest, brush and bog surrounding the area, and no confirmed sightings, Royal Canadian Mounted Police Assistant Commissioner Jane MacLatchy announced that they would be scaling down the deployment of resources to Gillam. Investigators are considering the possibility that McLeod and Schmegelsky “had some sort of assistance to flee the area,” MacLatchy said.

“To be clear, we’re not ending the search — a number of tactical resources and specialized assets will remain positioned in the Gillam area, and will continue with the efforts to locate the murder suspects,” MacLatchy told reporters at a press conference on July 31. “But when searching for people in vast, remote and rugged locations, it is always a possibility that they are not immediately located.”

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Posted On 07 Aug 2019