Trump offers condolences in wake of dual mass shootings: ‘Hate has no place in our country’

Political News Trump offers condolences in wake of dual mass shootings: 'Hate has no place in our country' https://linewsradio.com/trump-offers-condolences-in-wake-of-dual-mass-shootings-hate-has-no-place-in-our-country/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/politics-news/rss.xml

Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump offered his condolences on Sunday in the wake of the deadly mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, saying “hate has no place in our country.”

“I want to extend our condolences to the people of El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, incredible people who have been through a lot,” Trump said, standing beside first lady Melania Trump. “It was horrible but it could have been so much worse,” he added, noting the swift response of local law enforcement.

When asked by a reporter about how he plans to combat mass shootings, the president praised the work of his administration and seemed to point a finger at mental health issues. He appeared to ignore a separate question about white nationalism.

“We have done much more than most administrations, not talked about very much but we have done actually a lot,” Trump said. “But perhaps more has to be done.”

“This is also a mental illness, if you look at both of these cases, this is mental illness. These are really people that are very seriously mentally ill,” he said.

It was the first public appearance from the president, who did not address the public earlier this weekend while spending time at his private golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey. He did, however, responded to the shootings by tweeting a mix of condolences, politics and a tweet about UFC.

“Terrible shootings in ElPaso, Texas. Reports are very bad, many killed,” the president tweeted on Saturday afternoon, his first mention of the mass shooting. “Working with State and Local authorities, and Law Enforcement. Spoke to Governor to pledge total support of Federal Government. God be with you all!”

Minutes later, he wished UFC fighter Colby Covington good luck in his forthcoming fight. The president then shifted his focus to politics and began retweeting African American supporters who praised his policies.

On Sunday, the president seemed to refocus on the shootings.

“The FBI, local and state law enforcement are working together in El Paso and in Dayton, Ohio,” Trump tweeted Sunday morning. “God bless the people of El Paso Texas. God bless the people of Dayton, Ohio.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 04 Aug 2019

Russian opposition pledges more protests after 1,000 arrested

WORLD NEWS Russian opposition pledges more protests after 1,000 arrested  https://linewsradio.com/russian-opposition-pledges-more-protests-after-1000-arrested/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/rss.xml

anouchka/iStock(MOSCOW) — Russia’s anti-Kremlin opposition has pledged to hold more protests a day after police arrested hundreds of people for a second weekend running at a demonstration in Moscow calling for fair elections.

Opposition leaders said another protest planned in Moscow for next Saturday would go ahead, and Leonid Volkov, a key lieutenant of Russia’s most prominent opposition leader, Alexey Navalny, said they would try to expand them nationwide.

Volkov, on Twitter Sunday wrote that the opposition would “obviously” demonstrate again next Saturday, but said they would not negotiate on its location in Moscow with authorities. The city’s mayor’s office has offered the protesters a less central location to demonstrate but they have rejected it as an illegal restriction on their constitutional right to peaceful assemble.

“There is no point in trying to agree with people who are arresting the negotiators, using state terror, inventing criminal cases, setting brutal sadists with truncheons on citizens,” Volkov said, referring to the city authorities. Other opposition figures have said they are negotiating on location.

As they had a week before, on Saturday, hundreds of heavily-armored riot police cracked down on demonstrators as several thousand of them tried to gather on a central Moscow boulevard.

Although the protests were peaceful, police cleared them forcefully, advancing aggressively in lines with batons drawn and dragging away hundreds of people, often almost seeming at random. Videos posted on social media showed groups of police clubbing protesters on the ground.

The monitoring group OVD-Info said 1,001 people had been detained. Russia’s interior ministry put it at around 600 arrests from a crowd of about 1,500, but police are known to deliberately underestimate protest numbers.

The arrests on Saturday were so indiscriminate even some Kremlin supporters were swept up by police. An MP from the pro-government Liberal Democratic Party, Valery Bulygin was detained while praising the police response to a camera crew from the liberal channel, TV Rain. The police were behaving “quite softly,” Bulygin said, moments before he was hauled away.

The arrests in Moscow were criticized by Western countries. Germany’s foreign ministry called on Russia to release the demonstrators, saying “the arrests are not in proportion to the peaceful character of the protests.”

“Yesterday’s response undermines the rights of citizens to participate fully in the democratic process,” the U.S. embassy in Moscow’s spokeswoman wrote on Twitter.

The protests have been sparked by authorities refusal to allow opposition candidates to take part in Moscow’s city council elections this September. The issue though has taken on larger significance, seen by Moscow’s liberal society as a sign of the Kremlin’s intolerance of even low-level political opposition.

Authorities have responded by mounting a broad crackdown, arresting 1,400 people at the previous Saturday’s protest. Virtually all of the opposition’s top leaders have been arrested, most just before that protest. The majority have been given 2-4 week-jail sentences for organizing unauthorized demonstrations. Last week, Navalny was briefly hospitalized by what his doctor said she suspected was poisoning.

Lyubov Sobol, another key Navalny ally, who has become a face of the protests, told ABC News on Friday that she believed authorities were now determined to smother the protests with force.

“I think the authorities now are trying to find a way out of the crisis. They looked at different options and they went with the toughest option, the way of night-time searches and arrests of opposition leaders,” Sobol said, adding she thought there was no “no chance” the opposition candidates would be allowed to take part in the elections without mass demonstrations.

Sobol, one of the opposition candidates kept off the ballot, had been the last remaining protest leader still at liberty before she was detained on Saturday morning. She has been on hunger strike for 22 days. When ABC News reporters met her on Friday at her headquarters — where staff were nervously keeping watch for police — Sobol was so weak she struggled to stand.

The current protests are notable for their size and staying power. Some observers have interpreted as a hardening of attitudes among the part of the population opposed to the rule of president Vladimir Putin and that arrests and fines are no longer deterring people as they used to.

“Our country has changed, Muscovites have changed and they want a change. They want political representatives in elections,” Sobol said on Friday.

She said authorities had blocked the opposition candidates because they feared it would undermine the “propaganda myth” that the opposition has only 2% of the population’s support.

Polls show Putin himself remains popular, but the Kremlin is struggling to deal with the drastic unpopularity of his ruling party, United Russia, which has suffered some surprise election defeats in the past year.

 uthorities now seem to be turning to harsher tactics. Police this week charged half a dozen people with organizing and participating in “mass disorders,” a serious charge that potentially carries years in jail. Russia’s Investigative Committee on Saturday also announced it was planning to open a criminal case against Navalny’s anti-corruption foundation, which has exposed alleged graft among senior officials.

It recalls how authorities acted following one of the last major protests in Russia in 2012 ahead of Putin’s inauguration as president for a third term. In the so-called “Bolotnaya Affair,” named after the square where the protest happened, authorities jailed a dozen people to years in prison in hearings that international rights groups condemned as show trials.

One of those charged this time is Sobol’s assistant, Alexey Minyailo, something Sobol said was absurd given she says Minyailo was in court with her during the protest.

But Sobol said she believed the harsh trials would not have the same effect as in 2012.

“When they arrested rank and file activists, that frightened people,” Sobol said. “Now society has overcome that pain, it has learnt to resist and there is already not that fear.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 04 Aug 2019

Trump’s language about Mexican immigrants under scrutiny in wake of El Paso shooting

Political News Trump's language about Mexican immigrants under scrutiny in wake of El Paso shooting https://linewsradio.com/trumps-language-about-mexican-immigrants-under-scrutiny-in-wake-of-el-paso-shooting/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/politics-news/rss.xml

Official White House Photo by Joyce N. Boghosian(WASHINGTON) — Authorities in Texas on Saturday said that the suspect in the El Paso shooting that left at least 20 people dead and dozens injured had told them he wanted to shoot as many Mexicans as possible. They are also examining what they believe to be a “manifesto” written by the shooter that shows a possible “nexus” to a hate crime.

Suspect Patrick Crusius’ alleged motive for the Saturday shooting at the Walmart in El Paso with an assault-style rifle has renewed focus on President Donald Trump’s messaging at rallies and on social media as it relates to Mexico and Mexican immigrants.

The president has denied responsibility for inciting violence in American communities in the past, despite an ABC News investigation in November 2018 finding multiple criminal cases involving mostly white men where Trump’s name or rhetoric was invoked in direct connection with violent acts, threats of violence or allegations of assault.

Trump has downplayed white nationalism in the past, saying during a March press conference that he doesn’t think it’s a rising threat around the world and that people who commit acts of violence in the name of white supremacy are “part of a small group of people that have very, very serious problems.”

During a rally in May in Panama City Beach, Florida, Trump spoke about the border patrol agents working to stop migrants from crossing the border illegally. When he asked the crowd, “How do you stop these people?” one rally attendee shouted, “Shoot them.” At first laughing, Trump responded, “That’s only in the [Florida] panhandle, can you get away with that statement.”

When asked in July whether he is concerned that his tweets about four Democratic congresswomen of color were seen as racist and that white nationalist groups are finding common cause with him, Trump said, “It doesn’t concern me because many people agree with me.”

Trump has described migrants from Central and South America, many of whom are seeking asylum from violence in their home countries, as criminals, gang members and rapists. But since as early as October last year, he’s repeatedly described their attempts to cross the U.S.-Mexico border as an “invasion.”

“Many Gang Members and some very bad people are mixed into the Caravan heading to our Southern Border. Please go back, you will not be admitted into the United States unless you go through the legal process,” Trump wrote on Twitter on Oct. 29, 2018. “This is an invasion of our Country and our Military is waiting for you!”

In November, he tweeted that “the U.S. is ill-prepared for this invasion, and will not stand for it. [Migrants] are causing crime and big problems in Mexico. Go home!”

“I just got back [from the southern border] and it is a far worse situation than almost anyone would understand, an invasion!” he wrote in January.

In another tweet later in January, he said, “More troops being sent to the Southern Border to stop the attempted invasion of Illegals, through large Caravans, into our Country.”

In June, the president wrote, “People have been saying for years that we should talk to Mexico. The problem is that Mexico is an ‘abuser’ of the United States, taking but never giving. It has been this way for decades.” He went on to say that Mexico must “stop the invasion of our Country by Drug Dealers, Cartels, Human Traffickers, Coyotes and Illegal Immigrants.”

His most recent related tweet, in June, said, “We cannot allow all of these people to invade our Country. When somebody comes in, we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back from where they came.”

The president’s defenders said Trump shouldn’t be blamed for mass shootings, which have long-been a problem in the U.S. On Sunday, senior White House adviser Kellyanne Conway tweeted, “Finger-pointing, name-calling & screaming with your keyboards is easy, yet it solves not a single problem, saves not a single life.”

On ABC’s “This Week” on Sunday, acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney also defended the president, saying the gunmen in this weekend’s shootings were “crazy people” who “should not be able to get guns,” and adding, “No politician is to blame for that.

But Democratic presidential candidates have come forward to condemn the president’s rhetoric and its potential influence on suspects of violence.

On Sunday, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker wrote on Twitter, “When Donald Trump uses words like ‘infestation,’ ‘invasion’ and ‘s–thole countries’…when he refuses to condemn Neo-Nazis and white supremacists…Trump is giving license to this kind of violence. He’s responsible.”

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, whose hometown is El Paso, wrote that “President Trump’s racism does not just offend our sensibilities; it fundamentally changes the character of this country. And it leads to violence.”

Emmerson Buie Jr., the FBI special agent in charge in El Paso, said during a news conference Sunday that the Justice Department is seeking federal hate crime charges, as well as federal firearm and domestic terrorism charges against 21-year-old Crusius. He is already facing state capital murder charges and Texas will be seeking the death penalty, according to Buie.

The shooting occurred less than 14 hours before another suspect opened fire in Dayton, Ohio, killing at least nine and injuring dozens more. The suspect in that shooting, Connor Stephen Betts, was shot and killed “in less than a minute” after opening fire in the city’s crowded downtown area, Mayor Nan Whaley said Sunday morning on ABC’s “This Week.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 04 Aug 2019

2020 candidates Castro, O’Rourke slam Trump over mass shootings

Political News 2020 candidates Castro, O'Rourke slam Trump over mass shootings https://linewsradio.com/2020-candidates-castro-orourke-slam-trump-over-mass-shootings/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/politics-news/rss.xml

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Presidential candidate and Texan, Julián Castro, repeated his calls for gun control legislation after a mass shooting in El Paso, Texas, on ABC’s This Week Sunday.

The former Housing and Urban Development secretary also said, “It’s so unfortunate that not only our president, but his administration can’t rise up to the challenge of leadership in these times,” in response to Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney’s statement on the mass shooting in an earlier interview on This Week Sunday.

Fellow 2020 presidential candidate and the former congressman who represented El Paso, Beto O’Rourke, said that “it’s incredibly heartbreaking to see what these families are going through right now.”

In a separate interview with ABC News Chief White House Correspondent Jonathan Karl on This Week, he talked about some of the victims he met, including a woman who was shot in the chest and her mother who was also shot.

As for President Donald Trump’s rhetoric, O’Rourke said, “He doesn’t just tolerate. He encourages the kind of open racism and the violence that necessarily follows that we saw here.”

Twenty people were killed and 26 people were injured in a mass shooting Saturday at an El Paso, Texas, Walmart, officials said.

Another mass shooting occurred in Dayton, Ohio, just over 12 hours later. Police have said nine people are dead and more than a dozen are wounded.

Authorities in El Paso identified the suspect as Patrick Crusius, 21, of Allen, Texas. An assault style riffle, similar to an AK-47, was found at the scene of that mass shooting, officials said.

El Paso Police Chief Greg Allen said authorities are examining a “manifesto.” They believe was written by the shooter and shows a possible “nexus” to a hate crime.

Cielo Vista Mall, where the Walmart is located, is one of El Paso’s most popular malls, especially among Mexican tourists who come to the U.S. to shop. At least three Mexican nationals were killed in the attack, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 04 Aug 2019

Mick Mulvaney: President Trump’s rhetoric not to blame for mass shootings

Political News Mick Mulvaney: President Trump's rhetoric not to blame for mass shootings https://linewsradio.com/mick-mulvaney-president-trumps-rhetoric-not-to-blame-for-mass-shootings/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/politics-news/rss.xml

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney said no politician, including President Donald Trump, was to blame for shootings such as those in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, which left at least 29 people dead this weekend.

As Democratic presidential candidates point the finger at the president’s divisive rhetoric, Mulvaney said on ABC’s This Week that the suspect who allegedly killed 20 people at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, appeared to have been motivated by beliefs he harbored before Trump became president.

“This was a sick person. The person in Dayton was a sick person,” Mulvaney told ABC News Chief White House Correspondent Jonathan Karl, during an interview Sunday. “No politician is to blame for that. The person who was responsible here are the people who pulled the trigger. We need to figure out how to kind of create less of those kinds of people as a society and not trying to figure out who gets blamed going into the next election.”

Rep. Beto O’Rourke, a Texas Democrat running for president, on Saturday called Trump a “racist,” and said Trump “stokes racism in this country.” Fellow candidate Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, said Trump was “condoning white nationalism.”

Several of those killed in El Paso, which borders Mexico, were Mexican citizens, and officials said they are examining what they called a “manifesto” that they believe was written by the shooter and shows a possible “nexus” to a hate crime. After he was arrested, the suspect told investigators he wanted to shoot as many Mexicans as possible, two law enforcement officials told ABC News.

Pressed by Karl on whether Trump was at all to blame for using words like “invasion” to talk about illegal immigration and saying congresswomen of color should leave the country, Mulvaney said Trump was just as saddened and angered by the shootings as others.

“There’s no benefit here to trying to make this a political issue,” said Mulvaney. “This is a social issue.”

He labeled the gunmen in El Paso and Dayton “crazy people” who “should not be able to get guns.” The Dayton gunman, who died at the scene, killed at least nine people, authorities said. Dozens of people were injured in each attack.

“Sick people who are intent on doing things like this should not be able to buy guns legally,” Mulvaney said.

Rep. Veronica Escobar, whose congressional district includes El Paso, said Saturday night that while investigators must complete an investigation, the El Paso suspect’s so-called “manifesto” suggested the shooting could have been an act of “domestic terrorism.”

“In this country, we have a gun violence epidemic, but we also have a hate epidemic,” Escobar said in an earlier interview on This Week Sunday. “And until we confront that hate and until we confront the weak gun laws that we have, we’re going to keep seeing this.”

“Today’s shooting in El Paso, Texas, was not only tragic, it was an act of cowardice,” President Donald Trump tweeted overnight. “I know that I stand with everyone in this Country to condemn today’s hateful act. There are no reasons or excuses that will ever justify killing innocent people.”

After the Ohio attack, he tweeted that “Information is rapidly being accumulated in Dayton” and noted the law enforcement response “was very rapid in both” Dayton and El Paso. “God bless the people of El Paso Texas,” he added. “God bless the people of Dayton, Ohio.”

In March, asked by ABC News’ Senior National Correspondent Terry Moran asked the president in the Oval Office if he thought white nationalism was a rising threat around the world.

Trump replied, “I don’t, really. I think it’s a small group of people that have a very, very serious problem.”

Pushed by Karl about why the president has downplayed the threat of white nationalism, Mulvaney said white nationalism is not as big a threat as “international nuclear weapons.”

“I don’t believe he’s downplaying it. … Look, this is not the same as international, sort of, nuclear weapons,” Mulvaney said. “This is a serious problem, there’s no question about it. But they are sick, sick people. And the president knows that. Again, Jon, I don’t think it’s fair to try and lay this at the feet of the president.”

“I don’t think it’s at all fair to sit here and say that he doesn’t think that white nationalism is bad for the nation,” Mulvaney added. “These are sick people. You cannot be a white supremacist and be normal in the head.”

Later on This Week, Julian Castro, a former secretary of Housing and Urban Development who is running for the Democratic nomination for president, said the shooter in El Paso bore responsibility, but added that “most presidents have chosen to try to bring people together.”

“Anybody who has the ability to see and hear and understand what the president has been doing since he started his campaign in 2015 knows that division and bigotry and fanning the flames of hate has been his political strategy,” Castro said. “He’s given license for this toxic brew of white supremacy to fester more and more in this country. And we’re seeing the results of that.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 04 Aug 2019

French ‘bird-man’ crosses English Channel on flyboard

WORLD NEWS French ‘bird-man’ crosses English Channel on flyboard  https://linewsradio.com/french-bird-man-crosses-english-channel-on-flyboard/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/rss.xml

iStock(SANGATTE, France) — Just 10 days after a failed first try ended with Franky Zapata up to his neck in water, the French jet-ski champion successfully crossed the English Channel on his self-made “flyboard” Sunday morning.

Taking off at 8:17 a.m. local time, he flew across the 21.7 miles that separate the French town of Sangatte from Saint Margaret’s at Cliffe on the southeast British coast. The trip took a total of 22 minutes — with one refueling stop in the middle.

The French inventor’s flight came 110 years after famous pioneering pilot Louis Blériot flew the first plane across the Channel in 1909.

Zapata became known as the “flying soldier” when he showed off his invention before the world’s media at France’s annual Bastille Day military parade on July 14.

At a press conference on Saturday, Zapata said he felt much more confident off success than his failed journey just over a week ago. On July 25, Zapata had launched near Sangatte Beach on his flying board, but had to abandon the challenge when he dropped a few minutes later into English waters after hitting the supply boat platform at very low speed.

Halfway across the Channel, his wife Krystel Zapata got notice that her husband had successfully landed on the refueling platform. It took Zapata a couple of minutes to refuel his bag with kerosene and take off again.

Zapata arrived on British soil at 8:38 a.m., landing on a platform in a field at the top of a cliff. He thanked his wife, his family and his team upon landing. He also thanked the two British women who own the field he landed on.

“Well done. Our land is your land. Come anytime,” said one of the women.

Zapata spoke to the assembled French television networks in Saint Margaret’s, explaining that landing on the stage of the refueling boat was still very tricky. They had planned for the boat to remain still, but it was “impossible,” he said, as the boat moved along with the waves.

“Once I managed to stick my heels into the boat, I knew I had done 90% of the work,’’ he told French outlet BFMTV.

The flyboard cruised along at just over 100 mph throughout the nearly 22-mile trip.

“At the end, my thighs started burning,” said Zapata. “But I just told myself, ‘No, you need to enjoy this now.’ I just went 20 kilometers per hour faster — let’s go!”

Zapata burst into tears when his interview was interrupted by a call from his 9 year-old son, Matt.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 04 Aug 2019

POLL: Most Dem voters say both Biden, Sanders made convincing health care pitches

Political News POLL: Most Dem voters say both Biden, Sanders made convincing health care pitches https://linewsradio.com/poll-most-dem-voters-say-both-biden-sanders-made-convincing-health-care-pitches/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/politics-news/rss.xml

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Nearly five hours of contentious debate among 20 Democratic contenders over two nights last week showcased a stark ideological clash within the party over health care. Still, nearly six in 10 (58%) potential Democratic primary voters thought both Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and former Vice President Joe Biden made convincing arguments, according to a new ABC News/Ipsos poll.

The poll, conducted using Ipsos’ Knowledge Panel, asked Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents about the second Democratic debates in Detroit, which spanned two nights, with 10 contenders on each evening’s stage.

Despite appearing on different stages, the debates pitted polling frontrunner Biden — who seeks to reconcile Obama’s signature piece of legislation, the Affordable Care Act, with the party’s push to the left — against liberal Sanders, along with Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who are driving that push.

After being shown two video clips from the debates — one of Sanders and one of Biden each outlining part of his vision for improving health insurance coverage for millions of Americans, respondents were asked to say if they found each clip very convincing, somewhat convincing, not so convincing or not at all convincing.

The poll found that 58% of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents thought that both statements from Sanders and Biden were convincing.

Yet 19% of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents thought Sanders was convincing and Biden unconvincing, while 13% thought of Biden’s argument as convincing and Sanders as unconvincing. Only 10% of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents thought neither candidate was convincing.

Biden’s position centers on expanding on the Affordable Care Act: “Obamacare is working. The way to build this and get to it immediately is to build on Obamacare. Go back and do, take back all the things that Trump took away, provide a public option, meaning every single person in America would be able to buy another option if they didn’t like their employer plan or if they’re on Medicaid, they would automatically be in the plan. It would take place immediately and move quickly, and it would ensure the vast, vast, vast majority of Americans,” he said in the video clip shown to respondents.

Sanders’ stance reflects his “Medicare for All” plan, which he introduced in the Senate, and has become a dividing line for the Democratic contenders.

“The fact of the matter is, tens of millions of people lose their health insurance every single year when they change jobs or their employer changes that insurance,” the Vermont senator said in the clip shown. “If you want stability in the health care system, if you want a system which gives you freedom of choice with regard to a doctor or a hospital, which is a system which will not bankrupt you, the answer is to get rid of the profiteering of the drug companies and the insurance companies, move to Medicare for all.”

But more Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents — 31% — thought of the Sanders’ clip as very convincing, compared to only 18% who said the same of the Biden video.

Only 7% said the Sanders’ clip was not convincing at all, and only 9% thought of the Biden clip as not convincing at all. Most Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents fell in between for both Sanders and Biden.

Sanders also saw more support from a younger demographic than Biden: the youngest age demographic of 18- to 29 year-olds was the most likely to find the Sanders video very convincing — 34% — and those 65 and older were the least likely to find the Sanders video very convincing. Only 21% of that demographic thought so.

In this early stage of the primary, about two-thirds of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents said they didn’t watch any of the nationally televised debates.

For the one-third of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents who reported watching any of the debates, only 19% said the back-to-back debates were very useful, while 4% said they were not useful at all. But a majority of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents — 55% — said the debates were somewhat useful.

The presidential hopefuls are still six months out before the first voters cast their ballots in the Iowa caucuses in February — leaving them with ample time and opportunity to hammer out their differences on the campaign trail and on more debate stages.

This year’s third Democratic primary debate will be hosted by ABC News in partnership with Univision and is scheduled for Sept. 12 and 13 at Texas Southern University, a public, historically black university in Houston. So far, only eight candidates have qualified for those debates, based on an analysis by ABC News of polling and donor numbers.

METHODOLOGY

This ABC News/Ipsos poll was conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs‘ KnowledgePanel® Aug. 2-3, 2019, in English and Spanish, among a random national sample of 640 Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents. Results have a margin of sampling error of 4.3 points, including the design effect. See the poll’s topline results and details on the methodology here.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 04 Aug 2019

‘America is under attack’: Dem candidates call for gun control after El Paso shooting

Political News 'America is under attack': Dem candidates call for gun control after El Paso shooting https://linewsradio.com/america-is-under-attack-dem-candidates-call-for-gun-control-after-el-paso-shooting/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/politics-news/rss.xml

iStock(EL PASO, Texas) — The shooting Saturday afternoon that killed 20 people and injured more than two dozen more at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, brought immediate reactions from the crowded field of Democratic presidential candidates on the campaign trail.

Calls for a period of reflection before discussing politics — a familiar refrain for years in the wake of mass shootings — ceded to calls for increased gun control before all of the details of the attack were even known.

Many of the 2020 presidential candidates — 19 of 24 — were in Las Vegas for the AFSCME Convention as news of the shooting started to spread in the media.

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, a native of El Paso and a speaker at the convention, tweeted the shooting was “truly heartbreaking” before any news of injuries or deaths was even reported.

It was just minutes before all of the 20-plus candidates addressed the shooting, many initially on Twitter, and turned the conversation to increased gun control measures.

“We are in this unimaginably, just distraught moment in this country, where we seem to be almost accepting this idea that these are going to be a regular occurrence,” Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., told reporters at the AFSCME forum. “And so I have had enough of this, especially living in a community where gunshots are all too regular.”

“In this election, we have to have leaders are willing to stand up and say, I’m not going to let this issue be determined by what the interests of the corporate gun lobby are,” he added.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio hinted at a similar reluctance of conservative politicians to stand up to the gun lobby and the face of gun rights, the National Rifle Association.

“Countless tragedies all because the gun lobby has certain ‘leaders’ more scared of losing support than losing loved ones,” he said on Twitter. “Enough empty words. These families deserve action.”

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg focused his comments at the forum on gun control and the growing threat of white nationalism. The suspect in the El Paso shooting expressed a desire to kill as many Mexicans as possible after being arrested, two law enforcement officials told ABC News.

“America is under attack from homegrown white nationalist terrorism,” Buttigieg said. “And we have to talk and act about two things in this country. First of all, we are the only country in the world with more guns than we have people. We can respect the Second Amendment and not allow it to be a death sentence for thousands of Americans. And two, white nationalism is evil.”

Several candidates were critical of President Donald Trump for not doing more to create real gun reform in the U.S.

“Well, his responsibility is to do what the American people would like him to do, and that is to support the common-sense gun safety legislation that the overwhelming majority the American people support,” Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., said. “That’s not hard.”

Former Maryland Rep. John Delaney said “a lot can be done through executive action” in response to increasing gun protections.

Trump responded to the tragedy via Twitter, saying, “Today’s shooting in El Paso, Texas, was not only tragic, it was an act of cowardice. I know that I stand with everyone in this Country to condemn today’s hateful act. There are no reasons or excuses that will ever justify killing innocent people.”

Joe Biden, one of the president’s most persistent targets of criticism, said he’d reached out to O’Rourke about the shooting, and challenged the NRA’s honesty.

“Folks, even the NRA members know better,” Biden said late Friday. “Even the NRA members know we need universal background checks, the majority of them.”

“This is not just about what policy works better,” Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., said. “This is about a power of an outside group, and people who are too afraid to act. And it’s not just about mass shootings. It’s about every single day in America, in neighborhoods across the country.”

Most of the other candidates either weighed in from the stage in Las Vegas or tweeted about the shooting and what can be done legislatively to stop these massacres.

“My heart goes out to the families and individuals impacted by the El Paso shooting,” Andrew Yang wrote on Twitter. “We owe them and all Americans common sense gun safety laws. Other societies respond to senseless tragedies — we must do the same. We are better than this.”

“We haven’t been able to put an end to these horrific shootings,” said John Hickenlooper, who was governor of Colorado during the mass shooting at a movie theater in Aurora. “This should make every American furious.”

“We can start with requiring universal background checks and licensing and limiting high-capacity magazines,” he continued. “No one should be cowed by the NRA ever again.”

“Far too many communities have suffered through tragedies like this already,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., wrote on Twitter. “We must act now to end our country’s gun violence epidemic.”

O’Rourke canceled an appearance at California’s San Quentin State Prison and returned to El Paso Saturday evening, where he visited University Medical Center.

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(EL PASO, Texas) — The shooting Saturday afternoon that killed 20 people and injured more than two dozen more at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, brought immediate reactions from the crowded field of Democratic presidential candidates on the campaign trail.

 

Calls for a period of reflection before discussing politics — a familiar refrain for years in the wake of mass shootings — ceded to calls for increased gun control before all of the details of the attack were even known.

 

Many of the 2020 presidential candidates — 19 of 24 — were in Las Vegas for the AFSCME Convention as news of the shooting started to spread in the media.

 

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, a native of El Paso and a speaker at the convention, tweeted the shooting was “truly heartbreaking” before any news of injuries or deaths was even reported.

 

It was just minutes before all of the 20-plus candidates addressed the shooting, many initially on Twitter, and turned the conversation to increased gun control measures.

 

“We are in this unimaginably, just distraught moment in this country, where we seem to be almost accepting this idea that these are going to be a regular occurrence,” Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., told reporters at the AFSCME forum. “And so I have had enough of this, especially living in a community where gunshots are all too regular.”

 

“In this election, we have to have leaders are willing to stand up and say, I’m not going to let this issue be determined by what the interests of the corporate gun lobby are,” he added.

 

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio hinted at a similar reluctance of conservative politicians to stand up to the gun lobby and the face of gun rights, the National Rifle Association.

 

“Countless tragedies all because the gun lobby has certain ‘leaders’ more scared of losing support than losing loved ones,” he said on Twitter. “Enough empty words. These families deserve action.”

 

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg focused his comments at the forum on gun control and the growing threat of white nationalism. The suspect in the El Paso shooting expressed a desire to kill as many Mexicans as possible after being arrested, two law enforcement officials told ABC News.

 

“America is under attack from homegrown white nationalist terrorism,” Buttigieg said. “And we have to talk and act about two things in this country. First of all, we are the only country in the world with more guns than we have people. We can respect the Second Amendment and not allow it to be a death sentence for thousands of Americans. And two, white nationalism is evil.”

 

Several candidates were critical of President Donald Trump for not doing more to create real gun reform in the U.S.

 

“Well, his responsibility is to do what the American people would like him to do, and that is to support the common-sense gun safety legislation that the overwhelming majority the American people support,” Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., said. “That’s not hard.”

 

Former Maryland Rep. John Delaney said “a lot can be done through executive action” in response to increasing gun protections.

 

Trump responded to the tragedy via Twitter, saying, “Today’s shooting in El Paso, Texas, was not only tragic, it was an act of cowardice. I know that I stand with everyone in this Country to condemn today’s hateful act. There are no reasons or excuses that will ever justify killing innocent people.”

 

Joe Biden, one of the president’s most persistent targets of criticism, said he’d reached out to O’Rourke about the shooting, and challenged the NRA’s honesty.

 

“Folks, even the NRA members know better,” Biden said late Friday. “Even the NRA members know we need universal background checks, the majority of them.”

 

“This is not just about what policy works better,” Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., said. “This is about a power of an outside group, and people who are too afraid to act. And it’s not just about mass shootings. It’s about every single day in America, in neighborhoods across the country.”

 

Most of the other candidates either weighed in from the stage in Las Vegas or tweeted about the shooting and what can be done legislatively to stop these massacres.

 

“My heart goes out to the families and individuals impacted by the El Paso shooting,” Andrew Yang wrote on Twitter. “We owe them and all Americans common sense gun safety laws. Other societies respond to senseless tragedies — we must do the same. We are better than this.”

 

“We haven’t been able to put an end to these horrific shootings,” said John Hickenlooper, who was governor of Colorado during the mass shooting at a movie theater in Aurora. “This should make every American furious.”

 

“We can start with requiring universal background checks and licensing and limiting high-capacity magazines,” he continued. “No one should be cowed by the NRA ever again.”

 

“Far too many communities have suffered through tragedies like this already,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., wrote on Twitter. “We must act now to end our country’s gun violence epidemic.”

 

O’Rourke canceled an appearance at California’s San Quentin State Prison and returned to El Paso Saturday evening, where he visited University Medical Center.

 

Posted On 04 Aug 2019