Iran official says ‘don’t test us’ after oil tanker ‘sabotage’ amid tensions with US

WORLD NEWS Iran official says 'don't test us' after oil tanker 'sabotage' amid tensions with US  https://linewsradio.com/iran-official-says-dont-test-us-after-oil-tanker-sabotage-amid-tensions-with-us/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

Ruskpp/iStock(LONDON) —  “Don’t test us,” Hamid Baeidinejad, Iran’s ambassador to the United Kingdom said in an interview with Sky News Tuesday.

“While we have renounced any escalation in the region, I would assure you that Iranian armed forces are fully ready for any eventuality in the region, so they should not try to test the determination of Iran to confront any escalation in the region,” Baeidinejad said.

His comments come shortly after the head of Iran’s National Security Foreign Policy Committee, Heshmatollah Falahat Pisheh, said the international community must be wary of “making crises” surrounding the “sabotage” of four commercial ships off the coast of the United Arab Emirates over the weekend, as tensions continue to rise between Iran and the United States.

When asked about the attack on Monday, President Donald Trump fired a verbal warning to Iran, telling reporters, “We’ll see what happens with Iran. If they do anything, it would be a bad mistake.”

Pisheh said in an interview with Iranian state media Monday that “Iran and the United States can manage the crisis by themselves.”

“But there are third parties who might make the atmosphere of the region more sensitive in terms of security by making deviant moves,” he said. “There are different groups whose goal is to make the region unsafe. Therefore, there must be red lines between Iran and the United States in the management of the events which prevents third parties from making crises.”

The Islamic Republic of Iran condemns these moves, Piseh said, and has demanded the perpetrators be identified.

Saudi Arabia’s minister of energy said Monday that two of the ships damaged were Saudi oil tankers, one of which “was on its way to be loaded with Saudi crude oil from the [Saudi] port of Ras Tanura, to be delivered to Saudi Aramco’s customers in the United States.” It said there were no casualties and no spillage.

Saudi Arabia’s state news agency Saudi Press Agency said Monday the country “condemned the acts of sabotage.”

A Norwegian shipping company confirmed to ABC News that one of the ships it manages, an oil tanker called the MT Andrea Victory, was among the four damaged ships.

The initial assessment by a U.S. military team sent to assist the UAE is that Iran or Iranian-backed proxies placed explosive charges on the four ships anchored off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, a U.S. official told ABC News. The official said each ship sustained a 5- to 10-foot hole at or below the water line.

The Iranian reaction comes as The New York Times reported overnight that Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan had presented Trump with a military plan that could see 120,000 troops deployed in the Middle East if Iran were to attack American forces.

However, Dr. Sanam Vakil, senior research fellow at the Middle East & North Africa Programme of Chatham House, told ABC News such moves by the Trump administration should be taken as “bluster.”

“Of course we can see the parallels with the run up to the Iraq war, but … this is a president who lives up to his campaign promises,” she said. “He campaigned on leaving America’s military footprint from the Middle East, not increasing it.”

The Trump administration’s ultimate objective, she said, is to facilitate negotiations with Iran and negotiate a better deal after the U.S. pulled out of the JCPOA — the Iran nuclear deal — last year.

Meanwhile, “Iran are trying to send strong, but also conflicting messages about what their objectives are,” Vakil said, but she said talk of parallels with the situation leading up to the 2003 Iraq War are overplayed.

“I think the context is different,” she said. “Not only does the entire international community have a hangover [from] 2003, [but] the level of awareness of sleepwalking into another conflict that could potentially be much more dangerous and have wider regional implications, particularly those for European security, is making everybody very cautious.”

The possibility of an Iranian-U.S. war is worrying for many people in the country’s capital of Tehran.

Mehdi Mohammadi, 32, a part-time English teacher and PhD student of philosophy in Tehran, told ABC News he would not be happy with war, “unlike those who might think Trump will come and topple the system and bring the country a democratic system and freedom of speech.”

“Trump does not care about democracy here,” he said. “I hope Iran stops saying it does not negotiate. We are not the only ones Trump tore agreements with. China kept negotiating, so did Canada. Even negotiation with Trump is better than a war.”

Maryam Agharabi, 35, local Tehran business owner from the northern city of Rasht, said the recent tensions are unsurprising, but the primary concern for most Iranians is “changing our life style to adapt to the deteriorating economic conditions.”

“I do believe the sanctions on Iran should be called an ‘economic terror’ rather than an economic war,” she said. “War is reciprocal, like what is going on between China and America, where the two parties have means to use against each other. What America is doing against us is totally unilateral.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 14 May 2019

Iran warns international community of ‘making crises’ after oil tanker ‘sabotage’ amid rising tensions

WORLD NEWS Iran warns international community of 'making crises' after oil tanker 'sabotage' amid rising tensions  https://linewsradio.com/iran-warns-international-community-of-making-crises-after-oil-tanker-sabotage-amid-rising-tensions/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

Ruskpp/iStock(LONDON) —  The head of Iran’s National Security Foreign Policy Committee said the international community must be wary of “making crises” surrounding the “sabotage” of four commercial ships off the coast of the United Arab Emirates over the weekend, as tensions continue to rise between Iran and the United States.

When asked about the attack on Monday, President Donald Trump fired a verbal warning to Iran, telling reporters, “We’ll see what happens with Iran. If they do anything, it would be a bad mistake.”

Heshmatollah Falahat Pisheh, the head of Iran’s National Security Foreign Policy Committee, said in an interview with Iranian state media Monday that “Iran and the United States can manage the crisis by themselves.”

“But there are third parties who might make the atmosphere of the region more sensitive in terms of security by making deviant moves,” he said. “There are different groups whose goal is to make the region unsafe. Therefore, there must be red lines between Iran and the United States in the management of the events which prevents third parties from making crises.”

Pisheh said the Islamic Republic of Iran condemns these moves and has demanded the perpetrators be identified.

On Monday, Saudi Arabia’s minister of energy said two of the ships damaged were Saudi oil tankers, one of which “was on its way to be loaded with Saudi crude oil from the [Saudi] port of Ras Tanura, to be delivered to Saudi Aramco’s customers in the United States.” It said there were no casualties and no spillage.

On Monday, Saudi Arabia’s state news agency Saudi Press Agency said the country “condemned the acts of sabotage.”

A Norwegian shipping company confirmed to ABC News that one of the ships it manages, an oil tanker called the MT Andrea Victory, was among the four damaged ships.

The initial assessment by a U.S. military team sent to assist the UAE is that Iran or Iranian-backed proxies placed explosive charges on the four ships anchored off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, a U.S. official told ABC News. The official said each ship sustained a 5 to 10 foot hole at or below the water line.

The Iranian reaction comes as The New York Times reported overnight that Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan had presented Trump with a military plan that could see 120,000 troops deployed in the Middle East if Iran were to attack American forces.

However, Dr. Sanam Vakil, senior research fellow at the Middle East & North Africa Programme of Chatham House, told ABC News such moves by the Trump administration should be taken as “bluster.”

“Of course we can see the parallels with the run up to the Iraq war, but … this is a president who lives up to his campaign promises,” she said. “He campaigned on leaving America’s military footprint from the Middle East, not increasing it.”

The Trump administration’s ultimate objective, she said, is to facilitate negotiations with Iran and negotiate a better deal after the U.S. pulled out of the JCPOA — the Iran nuclear deal — last year.

Meanwhile, “Iran are trying to send strong, but also conflicting messages about what their objectives are,” Vakil said, but she said talk of parallels with the situation leading up to the 2003 Iraq War are overplayed.

“I think the context is different,” she said. “Not only does the entire international community have a hangover [from] 2003, [but] the level of awareness of sleepwalking into another conflict that could potentially be much more dangerous and have wider regional implications, particularly those for European security, is making everybody very cautious.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 14 May 2019

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in Russia to meet with Vladimir Putin

WORLD NEWS Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in Russia to meet with Vladimir Putin  https://linewsradio.com/secretary-of-state-mike-pompeo-in-russia-to-meet-with-vladimir-putin/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

State Department photo/ Public Domain(MOSCOW) — U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo flew into the city of Sochi on Russia’s Black Sea Tuesday to meet with President Vladimir Putin.

Pompeo arrived as Russia and the United States have been clashing over Venezuela and amid a spike in tensions with Iran, with fears of a possible military clash between the U.S. and Tehran growing.

But the trip comes as the Kremlin and White House have signaled they want to improve relations, and just as President Donald Trump said he will meet with Putin at a G20 summit in Japan next month.

Pompeo first met with Russia’s foreign minister, Sergey Lavrov, in Sochi. Both men struck an upbeat tone speaking in front of cameras at the start of their talks.

Pompeo told Lavrov the Trump administration is “committed to improving this relationship” and that the two countries were “not destined to be adversaries on every issue.”

“We understand that on both sides more than a little suspicion and prejudice have built up. But neither you, nor us gains anything from this,” Lavrov told Pompeo.

The trip was confirmed after Pompeo met with Lavrov last week in Finland’s capital Helsinki and U.S. officials have said they hope Pompeo and Putin will address a broad range of issues, from Venezuela, Iran and Ukraine, to the arms control and efforts to persuade North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons.

Russian officials have indicated they hope there may now be an opening to improve relations with the end of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Putin and Trump spoke at length on the phone on May 3, in a conversation both sides described as very positive. Trump said the two discussed what he called the “Russian hoax.”

In Sochi, Lavrov told Pompeo that the fact they were meeting a second time in two weeks gave ground for a “certain optimism.”

“Let’s try, and see what happens,” Lavrov said.

While Pompeo said he was sure there would be areas where they couldn’t find common ground, he said there was successful cooperation in counter-terrorism and that he believed understanding could be found on issues such as arms control and regional conflicts.

Russian officials will be further encouraged by Trump’s announcement Tuesday that he intends to meet with Putin at the G20 summit in Osako in late June. Trump cancelled a planned meeting with Putin at a previous G20 in Argentina last fall, saying he wouldn’t meet with the Russian leader until he released 24 Ukrainian sailors seized by Russia last year. The sailors remain on trial in Russia but Trump made no mention of them on Tuesday.

The mounting tensions with Iran, however, loom large over the trip. Pompeo cancelled a planned visit to Moscow on Monday, where he had been due to meet embassy staff and business leaders, instead diverting to Brussels, where he met with European leaders to discuss Iran and reassure them over an American decision to deploy additional forces to the region.

Venezuela will also likely dominate Pompeo’s meeting with Putin. Russia backs Nicolas Maduro as Venezuela’s president, rejecting calls for him to step down by opposition leader Juan Guaido, who the U.S. and many other countries support.

Moscow has long backed Maduro by propping up Venezuela’s economy with loans and providing him with military equipment. The clash between the U.S. and Russia over Venezuela has intensified in recent weeks, with Pompeo last month directly accusing Russia of blocking a deal that would have seen Maduro leave the country.

Russia has accused the U.S. of seeking illegal regime change. After their meeting in Finland, Lavrov warned Pompeo that American military intervention in Venezuela would have catastrophic consequences.

Some observers believe the Kremlin sees in the dispute over Venezuela a chance to strike a bargain.

“Moscow concluded then it found an issue it could use to force the U.S. to grant concession elsewhere, most notably in Ukraine,” Vladimir Frolov, a former Russian diplomat, wrote in an article for The Moscow Times last week.

After their call last week, Trump contradicted his own top advisers, including Pompeo, by saying he believed “Putin is not looking at all to get involved” in Venezuela other than “he’d like to see something positive happen.”

Frolov wrote the Kremlin could be ready to cooperate with the U.S. over Venezuela in return for a return to a Cold War-style understanding of “spheres of influence” that would see the U.S. make concessions in Ukraine. Russia wants the U.S. to pressure Ukraine’s government to fulfill parts of a peace plan there that would see it grant pro-Russian regions greater autonomy within the country.

“Moscow is ready to sell its stake in Maduro, but it is still unclear whether Washington is ready to offer the right price,” Frolov wrote.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 14 May 2019

Boy with nut allergy gets life-saving service dog after going into five-day coma

ABC(NEW YORK) — At a time when approximately one in 13 U.S. children are suffering from food allergies, some parents are turning to canine friends to help save the lives of their kids.

In honor of Food Allergy Awareness Week, which kicked off Monday, ABC News’ Good Morning America is putting a spotlight on a new defense against allergy attacks: trained dogs who work as service pets and potential lifesavers.

Hayden Kreikemeier, 13, first got his Labrador retriever, Trixie, three years ago to help with his life-threatening nut allergy.

Trixie likes treats and playing fetch, but she is more than just a pet to Hayden’s family — she is a trained super-sniffer who can potentially save lives and is specially trained to detect 12 different kinds of nuts that Hayden is allergic to.

Trixie accompanies Hayden everywhere he goes, from school to hangouts with friends.

“I feel safer with having Trixie with me like day to day,” he told GMA.

Trixie is one of the many trained canines in the U.S. who use their naturally keen sense of smell to detect even trace amounts of nuts.

Jay and Kelly Kreikemeier, Hayden’s parents, said they first started looking for help beyond just an epi-pen after Hayden accidentally ate a candy bar with peanuts and went into anaphylactic shock, and then a 5-day coma.

“I really thought that we had lost him,” Kelly Kreikemeier recalled of the health scare.

Hayden’s father said that following that incident, doctors gave the family a dire warning.

“He will not live through another reaction. So you’re going to have a choice to make,” Jay Kreikemeier said they were told. “You can either keep him at home and keep him away from everything and keep him 100% safe. Or you can continue to educate people around you.”

The family said they turned to a company that trains dogs to detect foods that may be deadly to people and found Trixie, who was trained just for Hayden.

“You can’t put a price on her for what she’s done for my family,” Kelly Kreikemeier said of the dog. “She’s pretty special.”

ABC News’ chief medical correspondent Dr. Jen Ashton cautioned that while dogs have incredibly sensitive noses — they can detect bombs, drugs and even chemical changes in the body that can lead to seizures — it is very important that someone looking for an allergy-detection dog does a lot of research ahead of time.

She added that it is also important to remember that dogs like Trixie are not pets, and have a very important job. Thus regular training sessions are vital for the dog and the handler.

Common symptoms of an allergy attack include trouble breathing, throat tightening, light-headedness, and a rash or hives. When an attack occurs, you should treat it immediately with an epi-pen, call 911 or visit the emergency room.

In the meantime, Ashton said that if a person becomes light headed, lay them down with their legs elevated to increase blood flow to important organs. Never prop someone up during anaphylaxis — keep them lying flat with their face up.

It is also important to note that more than one dose of epi-pen may be needed if symptoms do not stabilize or improve — so administer another dose five to 15 minutes after the first if needed.

Finally, Ashton notes that epipens have a limited shelf life and should be replaced annually.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Angelina Jolie and Michelle Pfieffer face off in the teaser-trailer for ‘Maleficent: Mistress of Evil’

Entertainment News  Angelina Jolie and Michelle Pfieffer face off in the teaser-trailer for 'Maleficent: Mistress of Evil' https://linewsradio.com/angelina-jolie-and-michelle-pfieffer-face-off-in-the-teaser-trailer-for-maleficent-mistress-of-evil/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

Disney(LOS ANGELES) — Angelina Jolie and Elle Fanning reprise their roles as Maleficent and Princess Aurora, respectively, in the just-released new teaser-trailer for Maleficent: Mistress of Evil.  And this time, they’re joined by Michelle Pfieffer.

“I remember this story of an evil witch and the princess he cursed to sleep forever,” Oscar winner Jolie is heard saying in the trailer for the sequel to 2014’s Maleficent. “The story became legend. But this is no fairy tale. There are many who prey on the innocent. I’m sure your kind would agree.”

“If I didn’t know better I would say you were making a threat,” Pfieffer’s Queen Ingrith answers.

“Well, do you?” asks Maleficent,” to which Ingrith responds, “Do I what?”

“Know better,” Jolie’s Maleficent snaps back.

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, opening nationwide October 18, picks up several years after the first film chronicled the events that drove the notorious Disney villain to curse a baby Princess Aurora. It follows the complex relationship between the two as they form new alliances and face new adversaries.

Maleficent was the fourth-highest-grossing film of 2014, earning over $758 million worldwide.

Disney is the parent company of ABC Radio.

 

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 14 May 2019

Female athletes slam Nike for allegedly penalizing them for being new moms

Sports News Female athletes slam Nike for allegedly penalizing them for being new moms https://linewsradio.com/female-athletes-slam-nike-for-allegedly-penalizing-them-for-being-new-moms/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/sports-news/

code6d/iStock(NEW YORK) — Alysia Montano was heralded as a supermom of sorts when she ran the 800-meter race at the 2014 U.S. Track and Field Championships while eight months pregnant.

Just a few weeks later, the track star gave birth to a healthy baby girl. Years later, in 2017, Montano ran in another U.S. Championship race while five months pregnant with her second child.

Now Montano, 33, is one of a couple of female athletes who allege to The New York Times that Nike penalized them while pregnant.

Montano spoke out in an op-ed video published Sunday in The New York Times, saying that Nike, “told me to dream crazy, until I wanted a baby.”

In the accompanying article, it is said that Montano “had to fight with her sponsor to keep her paycheck.”

Other athletes, all track stars, told the New York Times that Nike, their sponsor, did not guarantee them a salary during their pregnancies and immediately after having a child.

“Getting pregnant is the kiss of death for a female athlete,” Phoebe Wright, a runner sponsored by Nike from 2010 through 2016, told the Times. “There’s no way I’d tell Nike if I were pregnant.”

Olympian Kara Goucher told the newspaper she had to make a choice between training for a half-marathon so she could get paid by Nike to race again, or stay with her newborn son in the hospital.

“I felt like I had to leave him in the hospital, just to get out there and run, instead of being with him like a normal mom would,” Goucher said. “I’ll never forgive myself for that.”

“It took such a toll on me mentally and physically, for myself and for my child,” added Goucher, who ran the Boston Marathon seven months after giving birth. “Returning to competition so quickly was a bad choice for me. And looking back and knowing that I wasn’t the kind of mother that I want to be — it’s gut wrenching.”

In a statement, Nike responded to the athletes’ claims.

“Nike is proud to sponsor thousands of female athletes,” the statement reads. “As is common practice in our industry, our agreements do include performance-based payment reductions. Historically, a few female athletes had performance based reductions applied. We recognized that there was inconsistency in our approach across different sports and in 2018 we standardized our approach across all sports so that no female athlete is penalized financially for pregnancy.”

In addition to restrictions related to their sponsorships, Goucher and Montano say they both lost their health insurance from The United States Olympic Committee and U.S.A. Track & Field because they were unable to compete in the top tier of competitive races while having children.

The women’s claims are similar to what non-athlete women often face in the workplace when it comes to maternity leave in the U.S.

The United States is the only country among 41 industrialized nations that does not mandate paid maternity leave, according to 2016 data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) found that, in December 2017, just 15 percent of all private workers had access to paid family leave.

There are some examples, like Netflix and Facebook, of companies that provide extended paid family leave for new moms, and new dads, but it depends on the employer. Nike expanded its leave policy in 2016, making birth mothers eligible for a minimum of 14 paid weeks of leave and all new parents eligible to receive eight weeks of paid leave.

There are some female athletes who have been able to keep their sponsorship money during and after childbirth. The New York Times cited tennis star Serena Williams as an example.

Even Williams, though, had to fight for other rights — like her tournament seeding — when she returned to the pro circuit after giving birth to her daughter, Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr., in 2017.

The claims against Nike from female track athletes are garnering even more attention because of the spotlight Nike has placed on female athletes in advertising campaigns.

Williams was the voice of a viral ad that ran during this year’s Oscar ceremony. The ad featured famous female athletes and showed examples of the characterizations placed on them like “dramatic,” “nuts,” “delusional,” “unhinged,” “hysterical” and “crazy.”

“So if they want to call you crazy, fine. Show them what crazy can do,” Williams said in the commercial.

On Mother’s Day, Nike tweeted a video that encourages young female athletes to dream big, and to share their dreams. The video has more than 13 million views.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 14 May 2019

Trash found during record-setting dive to deepest place on planet

WORLD NEWS Trash found during record-setting dive to deepest place on planet  https://linewsradio.com/trash-found-during-record-setting-dive-to-deepest-place-on-planet/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

Discovery Channel(NEW YORK) — An American explorer has set a new deep diving record in the Mariana Trench, and in the process uncovered just how far human waste can travel.

Victor Vescovo has successfully completed a solo dive in the Pacific Ocean to Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench, commonly known as the deepest point on planet Earth.

“Personally being able to make the dive was just absolutely exhilarating,” Vescovo told ABC News.

Vescovo went nearly seven miles deep or 35,853 feet, that’s 52 feet more than any person has ever gone. He also became the first human to make multiple solo dives to Challenger Deep.

At the deepest point on the planet, Vescovo found what looked like plastic.

“It’s just an unfortunate consequence of multiple billions people on earth and all we consume,” he said.

An estimated 8 million tons of plastic are thrown into the ocean annually.

It wasn’t all grim findings, Vescovo also discovered at least three new species of marine life, including a shrimp with extra long legs, and collected rocks from an area where humans have never been.

His submarine, ‘Limiting Factor’ also made history.

“We dove to the bottom of the Mariana Trench five times in 10 days, it had had two visits in 60 years before we went there,” Vescovo said.

The ‘Five Deeps’ expedition has already successfully reached the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean, Southern Ocean, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean. Vescovo is planning to complete his historic expedition in late August when he dives the Molloy Deep in the Arctic Ocean.

First, Vescovo will dive to the second deepest trench in the Pacific, the Tonga Trench, he says there is a slim chance it could actually be deeper than the Mariana Trench.

Diving isn’t Vescovo’s only passion — he’s also a climber. Once he finishes his last dive in August, he will be the only person to ever summit the highest mountain on each continent and go to the lowest point of each ocean. He will have been to the “roof of the world,” Mt. Everest, and its floor, the Mariana Trench.

“I always had the urge to explore, even as a little kid,” Vescovo said.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 14 May 2019

Third US jury finds Roundup weed killer likely caused cancer, awarding couple $2 billion

NoDerog/iStock(OAKLAND, Calif.) — In a bombshell verdict, a couple in California have been awarded more than $2 billion in punitive damages in their civil case against Monsanto, after accusing the maker of Roundup weed killer of causing their cancer.

Alva Pilliod and wife Alberta of Livermore, both in their 70s, were diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2011 and 2015, respectively. The couple, married for close to 50 years, claimed that they’d sprayed Roundup on their various properties for decades.

The Oakland jury, which awarded each spouse $1 billion in punitive damages in addition to other damages, found that the active ingredient in Roundup — glyphosate — had likely caused the couple’s cancer.

This is the third verdict against Monsanto in Roundup cases and the biggest so far. The company is facing thousands of lawsuits.

In March 2019, a federal jury in California found that Monsanto’s Roundup weed killer caused a 70-year old man’s cancer.

The six-member jury in San Francisco federal civil court unanimously concluded that glyphosate was a “substantial factor” in Sonoma resident Edwin Hardeman’s non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Hardeman’s lawyers said the elderly man developed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma after using Roundup to spray his properties for almost three decades.

And, in August 2018, another California jury awarded groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson — the first to take on Monsanto — $289 million in state court, after a jury found Roundup caused his cancer. Johnson’s cancer was diagnosed as terminal.

Monsanto was acquired by the pharmaceutical giant Bayer for $63 billion last year. The company is appealing the two previous verdicts in Roundup cases, and it said it would appeal this verdict as well.

Bayer released a statement on its Twitter page after the jury’s verdict in California and has repeatedly said that glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, is safe.

Roundup is one of the widely used weed killers in the U.S., in use since the 1970s.

The American Cancer Society lists glysophate as a “probable carcinogen,” based on a 2015 finding that it is “probably carcinogenic to humans” by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, a part of the World Health Organization. The IARC’s classification has been controversial and subject to criticism and debate.

In March, after the second jury found that Roundup caused cancer, Bayer said that more than 800 studies submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency, European and other regulators “confirms that these products are safe when used as directed,” including a 2018 independent National Cancer Institute-supported long-term study that “found no association between glyphosate-based herbicides and cancer.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Duchess Meghan enters ‘4th trimester’: What women should know about postpartum care

DOMINIC LIPINSKI/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, is no longer pregnant — she gave birth to a son named Archie on May 6 — but she is still in what experts call the “fourth trimester” of pregnancy.

It is a period of time where women are both recovering from birth, a major medical event, while also grappling with the emotional and physical challenges that come with caring for a newborn.

It’s also a time where women should have consistent medical care, although a new survey shows that an alarming number of new moms in the U.S. do not.

More than 25 percent of women did not have a plan to manage their health after giving birth, according to the survey of more than 1,200 adult women, published last week in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

When asked about their personal obstacles to postpartum care, women cited many reasons, ranging from not having time, to feeling “selfish” for being overwhelmed, or simply feeling alone.

More than 40 percent of the women surveyed felt anxious, overwhelmed, or depressed, while more than one third of women felt embarrassed by the changes in their body after pregnancy.

Those feelings are the exact reason women need to regularly see their doctor after they give birth, experts say.

The American College of Gynecologists released new guidelines on postpartum care last year to reinforce the period of time after birth that it also calls the “fourth trimester.”

The ACOG now recommends that all postpartum women have contact with their OB-GYN or obstetrics provider within the first three weeks after delivery, and that care should continue on an ongoing basis, ending with a “comprehensive postpartum visit no later than 12 weeks after birth.”

What happens in the ‘4th trimester’?

It was one of Duchess Meghan’s closest friends, tennis superstar Serena Williams, who put the term “fourth trimester” in the spotlight last year after she opened up about suffering from postpartum depression following the birth of her daughter, Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr.

“I remember one day, I couldn’t find Olympia’s bottle and I got so upset I started crying … because I wanted to be perfect for her,” Williams told Harper’s Bazaar U.K. “Honestly, sometimes I still think I have to deal with it. I think people need to talk about it more because it’s almost like the fourth trimester. It’s part of the pregnancy.”

Williams has said she was forced to spend the first six weeks of motherhood unable to get out of bed after undergoing multiple operations due to a complication after her emergency C-section, an example of the medical need that continues post-delivery.

Yet as many as 40 percent of U.S. women who have given birth do not attend a postpartum medical visit, according to ACOG.

In addition to the physical recovery, women in the fourth trimester are also dealing with changing hormones. That time is also when a woman is learning to care for and feed her newborn.

ACOG recommends new moms have “sustained, holistic support” after birth.

The college has called for a woman’s comprehensive postpartum visit no later than 12 weeks after birth to include a “full assessment of physical, social, and psychological well-being,” including, “mood and emotional well-being; infant care and feeding; sexuality, contraception, and birth spacing; sleep and fatigue; physical recovery from birth; chronic disease management; and health maintenance.”

About one in every nine women suffer from postpartum depression in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Yet despite major medical organizations recommending screening for postpartum depression over the past several years, half of all women in the U.S. remain undiagnosed and untreated, studies show.

In addition to not receiving early monitoring and intervention for postpartum depression, women who do not receive postpartum medical care put themselves at risk for pregnancy-related death, which can occur up to a year after a woman gives birth.

In the week after delivery, severe bleeding, high blood pressure and infection are the most common causes of death. Between one week and one year after delivery, cardiomyopathy, or weakened heart muscle, caused the most deaths, according to the CDC.

Three in five pregnancy-related deaths in the U.S. can be prevented, the CDC found, citing contributing factors including lack of access to appropriate and high-quality care, missed or delayed diagnoses and lack of knowledge among patients and providers around warning signs.

Ensuring quality care for mothers throughout pregnancy and postpartum “should be among our nation’s highest priorities,” CDC Director Robert R. Redfield said in a statement.

What women need to do in the ‘4th trimester’

The adage that you have to put the oxygen mask on yourself first before being able to help others applies to moms who have just given birth. Just as a mom would not miss her child’s first doctor’s appointment, she needs to prioritize her own medical care and follow-up appointments.

Here are three action items for new moms, following guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG):

1. Make your postpartum care plan before you give birth: Know before you become a parent who is going to support you in parenthood. Know the doctors and experts you will need to see after you give birth, talk to your provider about what to expect in terms of your own body after birth and have conversations with your doctor about whether or not you plan to have future pregnancies

2. Talk to a maternal care provider within three weeks of giving birth: All women should ideally have contact with a maternal care provider within the first three weeks postpartum for an initial assessment, according to ACOG.

3. Talk to your provider about everything, including mental health: A woman’s postpartum visit no later than three months after she gave birth should include a full physical assessment as well as conversations about the woman’s social and mental well-being. No topic should be off limits, including pain, breastfeeding difficulties, stress, fatigue new mental health concerns, lack of sexual desire and body changes.

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Mom of two gives kidney to 24-year-old after seeing plea written on his mother’s car

Courtesy Lashonda Pugh(CHARLESTON, S.C.) — A mother has given the gift of life to a young stranger after seeing his mother’s plea for an organ donor written on the back windshield of her vehicle.

Starr Gardy, a mom of two from Charleston, South Carolina, gave her kidney to Daniel Jones Jr. on May 1.

Back in November, Gardy had stopped at a Walmart for party supplies for her daughter’s birthday when she saw a message on the window of Lashonda Pugh’s parked SUV.

Pugh has been employed at the Walmart location for 14 years and was working the day Gardy saw the message in the lot, she said.

“It said, ‘Please help. My son needs a kidney,’ and gave his blood type,'” Gardy told ABC News’ Good Morning America. “I just froze, and I felt so moved and thought, ‘What if I could help?'”

When he was a child, Jones was diagnosed with a genetic condition called Alport syndrome, which causes the progressive loss of kidney function.

On March 27, 2017, his health took a turn for the worst and he had to go on emergency dialysis, Jones told GMA.

“I was heartbroken,” Pugh said. “I felt like I couldn’t help him. Being his mother, I was going to do what I could to get him through this sickness.”

Jones needed a kidney, so Pugh shared a message on her car. Over a dozen locals reached out, but it was Gardy who was a match.

“I [asked] my kids, ‘How would you feel if mommy donated a kidney to somebody?’ They were both OK with it and my husband was like, ‘Whatever you want to do is fine with me,'” Gardy recalled. “I think later on he started to feel super moved by it all too.”

Gardy and Jones underwent transplant surgery at Charleston Hospital where both families met for the first time after the operation.

“It felt like she was family,” Pugh said. “We hugged and cried and I thanked her for giving my son a second chance at life.”

Jones said the experience was “a dream come true. I can’t repay her for it, so all I could do is thank her.”

Jones and Gardy are currently recovering. Jones is looking forward to returning to his job in road construction, he said.

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