Giants CEO caught on camera knocking wife to the ground

Sports News Giants CEO caught on camera knocking wife to the ground https://linewsradio.com/giants-ceo-caught-on-camera-knocking-wife-to-the-ground/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/sports-news/

Stephen Lam/Getty Images(SAN FRANCISCO) — San Francisco Giants team president and CEO Larry Baer was caught on camera in a physical altercation with his wife in a San Francisco park on Friday.

The video, first published on TMZ Sports, shows Baer knocking his wife, Pam, to the ground during a fight over a cellphone. In the video, you can hear her scream ‘Oh my God! No!

It also shows Baer holding the cellphone while walking away.

Baer told the San Francisco Chronicle, he and his wife had an argument over a family member and his wife fell off a chair during the argument.

He also told the Chronicle he has apologized to his wife.

San Francisco police were not called to the scene, but tell ABC News they are aware of the video and are investigating.

“Regrettably today we had a heated argument in public over a family matter,” the couple said in a statement. “We are deeply embarrassed by the situation and have resolved the issue.”

Major League Baseball released a statement saying they are looking into the incident.

“Major League Baseball is aware of the incident and, just like any other situation like this, will immediately begin to gather the facts,” the league said. “We will have no further comment until this process is completed.”

Baer was part of the ownership group that bought the team in 1992 to keep them in San Francisco. He became CEO of the Giants in 2012.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 01 Mar 2019

Phoenix bicyclist survives rattlesnake bite and pedals for half hour to get help

Angie Watkins(PHOENIX) —  Jim Watkins was biking with a friend in the Apache Wash Trail in northern Phoenix, Arizona, when he got bitten by a rattlesnake after falling off his bike.

Watkins said since he was riding a new bike he lost momentum on a steep hill and when he tried to un-clip his shoes he tumbled over into a bush where the snake was lurking.

“He was rattling pretty angrily, once I got bitten it just felt like a bee sting so I was thinking, ‘this wasn’t too bad,'” Watkins told ABC News.

Following the bite, they continued to ride for 30 minutes back to the trail head where they called Poison Control.

At first, Watkins was unconvinced when Poison Control urged him to go to the emergency room, “I kept saying I’m not feeling anything but they finally convinced me to go, which is obviously the right thing to do,” the 75-year-old rider said.

He arrived at the Banner University Medical Center at around 5 p.m. where Watkins stayed for two nights and received 14 vials of antivenin.

It was fortunate he arrived at the time he did, Watkins said, as his leg was started to “swell up” and become “very painful” a few hours later.

Watkins is an avid outdoors-man and had been mountain biking for 25 years. “I probably seen 10-12 rattlesnakes, it’s rare to spot one let alone be bitten by one,” he said.

According to Poison Control “the beginning of warmer weather is the beginning of snakebite season,” urging those who are bitten by a snake to remain calm, avoid using old first aid remedies and call Poison Control right away.

Ironically, the route they were biking on was called the Sidewinder trail, which happens to be the name of the type of rattlesnake he unfortunately encountered.

In a funny way it was “prophetic,” Watkins added.

Watkins said the incident definitely won’t stop him from going about his normal outdoors activities, but he will be more observant next time.

After the ordeal, his friend asked what they could have done differently Watkins jokingly answered “well, you could have gone up the hill first.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Katy Perry says being a judge on ‘American Idol’ makes her “feel like a good person”

Entertainment News  Katy Perry says being a judge on 'American Idol' makes her "feel like a good person" https://linewsradio.com/katy-perry-says-being-a-judge-on-american-idol-makes-her-feel-like-a-good-person/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

ABC/Craig Sjodin(NEW YORK) — American Idol returns to ABC this Sunday night, and there’s no doubt that this season’s crop of contestants will benefit from the advice of judges Katy Perry, Lionel Richie and Luke Bryan.  But as Katy explains, the benefits she receives from the contestants are just as important.

“To be able to pay it forward by caring…I care so much about these kids,” she says of judging. “I mean, I’m just so encouraged by these kids. And it makes me feel like a good person while doing it, so I love it!”

Katy says this season, it’s important to her to find contestants that are as good, or better, than last year’s top 10, which she considers to have been stellar.

“It was so diverse, it was so unique, there weren’t just people with good voices, there were great people with personality that had star power,” she says of last year’s hopefuls.

“And I’m gonna continue to look for that… because, of course it’s a singing competition…but it’s not, like, American Singer, she notes. “It’s the Idol, and for the Idol factor, you’ve got to have have so many different things going for you.”

But Lionel Richie says he believes the talent this season matches Katy’s expectations.

“If you thought last year had talent, Oh. My. God!” he tells ABC Radio. “They came out of the woodwork!”

“You’re just gonna love it,” he adds. “This is [last year] on steroids!”

Lionel also says this season, the contestants are “bringing some of the greatest stories.”  And that’s why he, Luke and Katy are content to, “just sit back and, instead of trying to be the show, let THEM be the show.” 

American Idol returns Sunday night at 8 p.m. ET on ABC.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 01 Mar 2019

“Who’s the Boss?” and “Soap” star Katherine Helmond dead at 89

Entertainment News  "Who's the Boss?" and "Soap" star Katherine Helmond dead at 89 https://linewsradio.com/whos-the-boss-and-soap-star-katherine-helmond-dead-at-89/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

ABC Television/Fotos International/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) — Katherine Helmond, the Emmy-nominated, flame-haired star of the ’70s sitcom Soap, as well as TV’s Who’s the Boss? has died, Variety reports. 

Helmond, who played Jessica Tate on Soap, and Judith Light’s character’s mom Mona Robinson on Who’s The Boss, died February 23 from complications of Alzheimer’s Disease, according to the publication.  She was 89.

Helmond’s role in Soap earned her four Emmy nominations; she grabbed another two nods for her role on Who’s the Boss.  Helmond also had recurring roles on the Craig T. Nelson sitcom Coach, playing Doris Sherman, and on Everybody Loves Raymond, playing Debra Barone’s mother, Lois Whelan.

The movies she appeared in include Family Plot, Overboard, Time Bandits, Brazil and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.  She also provided the voice for Lizzie, the Ford Model T, in the three animated Cars films from Disney/Pixar.

A Broadway star as well as a film and TV actress, Helmond won a Tony Award in 1973 for her role in the Eugene O’Neill play The Great God Brown.

Helmond’s Who’s the Boss co-star Alyssa Milano tweeted, “Katherine Helmond has passed away. My beautiful, kind, funny, gracious, compassionate, rock. You were an instrumental part of my life. You taught me to hold my head above the marsh! You taught me to do anything for a laugh! What an example you were! Rest In Peace, Katherine.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 01 Mar 2019

‘Between frying pans and fires’: Brexit might be delayed or settled by a second referendum after UK parliament votes next week

WORLD NEWS 'Between frying pans and fires': Brexit might be delayed or settled by a second referendum after UK parliament votes next week  https://linewsradio.com/between-frying-pans-and-fires-brexit-might-be-delayed-or-settled-by-a-second-referendum-after-uk-parliament-votes-next-week/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

John Keeble/Getty Images(LONDON) — The United Kingdom is scheduled to leave the European Union (EU) in four weeks’ time, and yet, on the surface, it seems like little progress has been made. Behind the scenes, party defections and political infighting have opened up the possibility that the scheduled departure could be delayed or, even more astonishingly, completely reversed. Brexit remains an incredibly divisive issue in the U.K., and as the deadline looms it is now firmly in the hands of British lawmakers to deliver on the result of the referendum in 2016, which saw “leave” beat “remain” by 52 to 48 percent.

Upcoming votes: Brexit delayed?

On March 12, U.K. lawmakers will once again have a chance to vote on Theresa May’s Brexit deal, the controversial withdrawal agreement that she has spent the better part of two years negotiating with EU leaders. The prime minister has promised to negotiate a better deal than the one that was defeated in Parliament by a historic 230 votes on Jan. 15. For the most part, however, the deal is likely to be the same, as the European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker has repeatedly said the EU is “not in a position to agree to anything that changes” the deal.

With the deadline for exiting the EU fast approaching on March 29, however, some lawmakers may change their votes this time around.

“I would say she’s got a better chance than she had before,” Tom Newton Dunn, political editor at The Sun newspaper, told ABC News, “But it’s still going to be tight, very tight.”

However, if the government loses the vote on March 12, lawmakers will get a chance to vote on the option of leaving the EU with “no deal.” It is highly unlikely that this will pass, as politicians and business leaders alike have warned that a no-deal Brexit would have catastrophic effects on the British economy. Some people have even been stockpiling food and medicine in the event of no deal.

If the U.K. Parliament votes against no deal, May has promised that the government will request an extension to the Brexit deadline from the EU to give lawmakers more time to come to an agreement. This would be a “deep humiliation” for the prime minister, according to Dunn.

Defections

Over the past two years, May has repeatedly stated that the U.K. will leave the EU on March 29. So what’s changed?

A number of major defections from the U.K.’s two main parties — May’s Conservatives and Jeremy Corbyn’s socialist Labour Party — have shaken up the Brexit process that appeared to be stagnating.

On Feb. 18, seven Labour Members of Parliament (MPs) dramatically left the Labour party. Led by Chuka Umunna MP, they formed an organization called The Independent Group (TIG) and said they could no longer be part of Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour party because it had not backed a second Brexit referendum and had mishandled allegations of anti-Semitism.

TIG were then joined by three pro-European Conservative member MPs from Theresa May’s Conservative Party, saying they could not support Theresa May’s Brexit policy and the rise in influence of the party’s right-wing. The new group claims that it hopes to fill the center ground of British politics by “pursu[ing] policies that are evidence-based, not led by ideology.” Among their main goals is to have a second referendum on exiting the EU.

so, in order to stave off further resignations, Theresa May has agreed to delay Brexit if Parliament votes against her deal (and if there is no deal).

The leader of the Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, has now decided to back a second referendum if his own “soft” version of Brexit cannot get through Parliament — in order to prevent more MPs from his own party from leaving the party. It is not yet clear what would be on the ballot paper, but it would likely be a case of Theresa May’s deal versus remaining in the EU.

The government’s position: ‘Between frying pans and fires’

For now, the chances of U.K. lawmakers voting for a second referendum are low.

“At the moment the parliamentary arithmetic isn’t there for it,” according to Dunn, though this could change after Brexit is delayed.

“If the binary choice in front of Theresa May is either a no-deal Brexit or her deal with a second referendum attached to it, these sort of choices are choices between frying pans and fires [for the government],” he said.

The government, meanwhile, remains hopeful that these circumstances will be avoided by winning the vote on March 12th.

“We’re against a second referendum,” senior government minister Amber Rudd told ABC News. “We agreed that the ‘will of the house’ is to stop no-deal on March 29th and have agreed that if the withdrawal agreement is rejected Parliament can vote on whether to go ahead with no deal and if it votes against that, the government will request an extension. What will happen? I believe that the withdrawal agreement will get through at the next vote before March 12th.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 01 Mar 2019

Report: Amanda Bynes has relapsed; under care for addiction and mental health issues

Entertainment News  Report: Amanda Bynes has relapsed; under care for addiction and mental health issues https://linewsradio.com/report-amanda-bynes-has-relapsed-under-care-for-addiction-and-mental-health-issues-2/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

Photo by Raymond Hall/GC Images(LOS ANGELES) — TMZ is reporting that former child star Amanda Bynes has suffered a relapse, and is currently being treated for mental health and addiction issues.

According to the gossip site, “the pressure of being back in the public eye, plus auditioning in Hollywood again…was too much too soon for Amanda.” She started treatment again in January, though her relapse happened months before, TMZ claims.

Bynes gave an interview to Paper magazine in November in which she stated she’d been sober for four years, following a string of high profile run-ins with the law, and controversial interactions with other celebrities on Twitter. She was later diagnosed with bipolar disorder, went to rehab, and her finances and other dealings placed under the care of a conservatorship started by her parents.

She said of her drug use, “Those days…are long over. I’m not sad about it and I don’t miss it because I really feel ashamed of how those substances made me act. When I was off of them, I was completely back to normal and immediately realized what I had done — it was like an alien had literally invaded my body.”

The Paper article noted that while she’d been on the straight and narrow and was pursuing a fashion design degree, Bynes, who once had two hit Nickelodeon shows, and later starred in films including Easy A, said she wanted to return to acting.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 01 Mar 2019

Report: Amanda Bynes has relapsed; under care for addiction and mental health issues

Photo by Raymond Hall/GC Images(LOS ANGELES) — TMZ is reporting that former child star Amanda Bynes has suffered a relapse, and is currently being treated for mental health and addiction issues.

According to the gossip site, “the pressure of being back in the public eye, plus auditioning in Hollywood again…was too much too soon for Amanda.” She started treatment again in January, though her relapse happened months before, TMZ claims.

Bynes gave an interview to Paper magazine in November in which she stated she’d been sober for four years, following a string of high profile run-ins with the law, and controversial interactions with other celebrities on Twitter. She was later diagnosed with bipolar disorder, went to rehab, and her finances and other dealings placed under the care of a conservatorship started by her parents.

She said of her drug use, “Those days…are long over. I’m not sad about it and I don’t miss it because I really feel ashamed of how those substances made me act. When I was off of them, I was completely back to normal and immediately realized what I had done — it was like an alien had literally invaded my body.”

The Paper article noted that while she’d been on the straight and narrow and was pursuing a fashion design degree, Bynes, who once had two hit Nickelodeon shows, and later starred in films including Easy A, said she wanted to return to acting.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 01 Mar 2019

Vaccine myths: 9 facts about vaccines everyone should know

iStock/Davizro(NEW YORK) — It’s a daily routine for pediatricians: Promise a lollipop or sticker to a 4-year-old child in return for giving them a shot. Then, watch as they melt down and their parents chase them around the clinic.

Even if the child doesn’t want it, the aforementioned scenario is not usually one that stops parents from vaccinating their children. Yet, a persistent group of moms and dads won’t let their children get the shots.

A CDC report shows a rise in unvaccinated children. It found that in 2017, roughly 1.3 percent of children between 19 and 35 months old hadn’t received any vaccinations — an increase from 0.3 percent in 2001. Similarly, the number of kindergartners with an exemption from school vaccination requirements rose for the third consecutive year to a median of 2.2 percent, the CDC found.

“Some families think that vaccinations are harmful to children, and natural immunity — getting the disease and then mounting an [immune] response — is better than vaccine immunity,” Dr. Eve Farber, residency director in the Department of Family Medicine at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, told ABC News.

But this isn’t true, either. And with vaccines estimated to prevent over 21 million hospitalizations and 732,000 deaths among children born in the last 20 years, it’s worth pointing out the myths of childhood vaccines.

Myth: Vaccines do not really work.

They definitely work. Vaccines help develop immunity (protection) by imitating an infection. They do this by introducing a dead or weakened version of the virus or bacteria into the body (more on this next). This type of infection almost never causes the actual illness; it only triggers the immune system to produce antibodies, which may lead to minor symptoms like fever. The body needs a few weeks to make these antibodies, so vaccines aren’t typically effective as soon as the shots are given.

Myth: All vaccines contain the “live” or active form of the pathogen.

Scientists take many approaches to developing vaccines based on the information they have about the infections. But in general, there are five main types of vaccines that infants and young children are commonly given:

Live attenuated: These have a weakened version of the virus or bacteria — enough that it won’t cause serious illness. But not everyone can receive these, especially people who have a weakened immune system.

Inactivated: This type of vaccine is made by killing the pathogen during the process of making the vaccine. It cannot cause infection.

Toxoid: These vaccines prevent diseases caused by bacteria that produce toxins (poisons) in the body. It does not put those bacteria inside the body.

Subunit: These vaccines include only parts of the virus or bacteria — “subunits” — instead of the entire germ.

Conjugate: These vaccines connect the outer coating of the bacteria to another unrelated portion of the bacteria. The goal of this vaccine is to promote antibody production in the body without allowing the bacteria to reproduce.

Myth: My child is healthy and does not need to get vaccines.

Before vaccines were available, many children died from the 14 diseases that we can now prevent, according to the Academy of Family Physicians. Diseases like chickenpox, whooping cough, the flu, measles and meningitis are dangerous life-threatening and they haven’t been eradicated from this world yet, so children who haven’t been vaccinated are susceptible.

Myth: Vaccines are not safe.

Vaccines are not only effective, they are safe too. Your child may have side effects from them, such as mild soreness, redness where the shot was given and slight fever, but the benefits far outweigh these effects.

Myth: The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program exists because vaccines cause a lot of serious complications

Most people who get vaccines won’t experience side effects from them. On the rare occasion that there are side effects, they tend to be mild, like feeling soreness in the area where the shot was given. Some health conditions might develop after a vaccine is given, but be completely unrelated to the vaccine, only developing afterward as a coincidence. On even rarer occasions — about 1.3 out of every million — vaccines might cause allergic reactions for a variety of reasons. The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program was designed to deal with these rare cases and can provide financial support to those affected.

“Most people who get vaccines have no serious problems,” officials at the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program told ABC News. “Vaccines, like any medicines, can cause side effects, but most are very rare and very mild. There is no credible scientific evidence of any link between vaccines and autism. The government has never compensated, nor has it been ordered to compensate, any case based on a determination that autism was actually caused by vaccines.”

Myth: Vaccines cause autism.

Autism happens just as often in children who get vaccinated as it does in those who don’t, according to the AFP. Parents often think vaccines cause autism because symptoms of autism begin to appear at the same age that children are supposed to get the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. One study from 1998 suggested a connection between the two, but that study was retracted due to flawed methodology. Repeated studies thereafter have found no link between vaccines and autism.

Myth: Vaccines contain mercury, which can be harmful.

Mercury is naturally found in the air, soil and water. Thimerosal is a mercury-based preservative that has been used in vaccines to prevent the growth of bacteria and improve shelf life. Thimerosal has been shown to be safe in vaccines and our body eliminates it easily. All vaccines for children age 6 and under are available in formulations without thimerosal, and there are vaccines that are thimerosal-free for adolescents and adults, too.

Myth: You only need one dose of a vaccine.

For some vaccines, the first dose isn’t enough to provide full immunity from the pathogen(s) it is targeting — some vaccines may wear off after a few years. When this is the case, children will need “booster” shots. If you’re unsure about whether the shot your child is getting needs a booster, ask their doctor.

Myth: There is no harm in delaying vaccines or not getting them ‘on schedule.’

Delaying shots just increases the time in which a child can contract a disease. And in cases where a booster is needed, waiting only opens up the window for a potential infection as the initial shot wears off.

Since a child’s immune system is still developing, getting vaccinated on time, based on the CDC’s recommended schedule, will help it to be the strongest it can be.

If you have additional questions about vaccines, please consult with your doctor or visit the CDC’s vaccine safety page.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Trump touts ‘substantive negotiations’ with North Korea despite summit collapse

WORLD NEWS Trump touts 'substantive negotiations' with North Korea despite summit collapse  https://linewsradio.com/trump-touts-substantive-negotiations-with-north-korea-despite-summit-collapse/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump on Friday continued to strike an optimistic tone about his summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, praising what he called “substantive negotiations” during his time in Vietnam despite their failure to come to any agreement on denuclearization.

“We know what they want and they know what we must have,” Trump said in a tweet Friday morning. “Relationship very good, let’s see what happens!”

Trump’s claim that both sides understood each other’s demands followed a backlash from U.S. and North Korean diplomats seeking to explain the impasse that led to the collapse of the negotiations in Hanoi.

In a press conference on Thursday following the summit, President Trump said he chose to walk away from the talks after Kim demanded the lifting of “all” sanctions in exchange for the guarantee of independent inspections for a key nuclear enrichment plant.

“Basically, they wanted the sanctions lifted in their entirety, and we couldn’t do that,” Trump said. “They were willing to denuke a large portion of the areas that we wanted, but we couldn’t give up all of the sanctions for that.”

But hours later, in a rare news conference, North Korean officials pushed back on the president’s characterization, claiming that the country only wanted partial sanctions relief.

“We proposed to remove sanctions from five of 11 U.N. sanctions resolutions, specifically ones that impede livelihood of our people,” North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho said through an interpreter. “This proposal was the biggest denuclearization [measures] we could take at the present state in relation to the current level of confidence between the DPRK and the United States.”

A U.S. official later conceded to reporters that the North Koreans didn’t ask for sanctions on their weapons programs to be removed, but said they asked for an end to all sanctions since March 2016 that have put a major strain on the country’s economy and people.

According to the official, the U.S. refused that demand because those economic sanctions have put the most significant pressure on the country, costing it “many, many billions” of dollars, without which the U.S. would be “subsidizing” their weapons program.

A separate North Korean diplomat later in the news conference appeared to cast a cloud over the prospect of any further meetings between Trump and Kim as a result of the disagreement.

“I feel that the Chairman [Kim] may have lost the will for future dealings,” Choe Son-hui, a vice minister in the Foreign Affairs ministry said.

However, a statement aired on North Korea’s state media following the news conference seemed to back away from such an ominous tone, saying the summit “offered an important occasion for deepening mutual respect and trust” between the two leaders.

“They agreed to keep in close touch with each other for the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and the epochal development of the DPRK-U.S. relations in the future,” the statement said.

How the two countries might be able to bridge the divide in their positions remains a key question.

Lawmakers in Washington struck a surprisingly bipartisan tone in praising Trump’s decision not to accept the North Koreans’ offer, even as many criticized him continuing to lavish the young dictator with personal praise.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told reporters Friday in Manila that the U.S. is “anxious” to get back to the negotiating table as the two countries seek to iron out the key differences that emerged in Hanoi and come closer to achieving a deal.

“There was still not complete clarity with respect to the full scope of what it is they were prepared to offer,” Pompeo said. “It’s one of the reasons I hope we can get back so that we can put that together.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 01 Mar 2019

African-American eating disorder survivor shares her message that eating disorders don’t just affect ‘thin, young, white affluent women’

ABC News(NEW YORK) — Giva Wilkerson is an African-American woman and one of the nearly 30 million Americans who suffer from an eating disorder.

“I remember laying in bed and the hunger pains were so intense that I began to cry and I said to myself, ‘All you have to do is go downstairs and get something to eat,’” Wilkerson recalled of her 15-year struggle with anorexia. “And I wouldn’t do it. And I was crying because I was hungry too because I was afraid to eat.”

Once Wilkerson, 36, began her recovery four years ago, she made it her mission to shatter the “huge” misconception that eating disorders only affect “thin, young, white affluent women.”

Wilkerson, of Philadelphia, is now the program manager at Project HEAL, a Colorado-based organization founded in 2008 that provides support for people with eating disorders. The organization also works to raise funds for those suffering who cannot afford treatment.

“You have people of all genders, all races, all classes, all cultures coming together to talk about this illness that has affected their lives,” Wilkerson said in an interview with “Good Morning America’s” Ginger Zee, who has also been public about her struggle with anorexia.

Environmental stress (like racism and poverty) may make women of color more vulnerable to eating disorders. People of color though are less likely to receive help for their eating issues according to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA).

In one study where clinicians reviewed case studies demonstrating disordered eating symptoms, 44 percent identified the white woman’s eating behavior as problematic but only 17 percent identified the black woman’s eating behavior as problematic.

In addition to women from all backgrounds and ages suffering from eating disorders, men do too.

Approximately one-in-three people struggling with an eating disorder is male and approximately 10 million males in the U.S. are affected at some point in their lives, according to the nonprofit NEDA.

Major League Baseball player Mike Marjama opened up last year about suffering from an eating disorder in high school and getting help through a five-day stay in an in-patient program.

“If I can maybe affect one person that doesn’t have to have their hopes and dreams taken away from them because they’re suffering from an eating disorder, and they’re able to follow their hopes and dreams, that’s all I really want,” Marjama told “GMA” at the time about why he chose to speak out.

Eating disorders have no known cause but researchers are finding they are caused by a “complex interaction of genetic, biological, behavioral, psychological, and social factors,” according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).

Why people don’t get help

As many as 70 percent of people who may have an eating disorder do not get treatment, according to Dr. Janet Taylor, a Florida-based psychiatrist.

Feelings of shame and not having access to adequate medical care can affect people’s ability to get treatment, Taylor explained. A focus on weight by medical professionals and not on patterns of eating can also delay treatment, according to Taylor.

Eating disorders must also be treated from both a mental health and medical health perspective, which can lead to a complicated patchwork of insurance coverage to wade through.

“It’s so expensive and it’s so hard to get,” Wilkerson said of treatment for eating disorders. “And honestly, it’s important for you not only have access treatment but access to treatment that’s close by.”

Eating disorders also take on different signs and symptoms in each person. The most common eating disorders include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder.

The results of not getting treatment can be deadly, statistics show. Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness, according to data compiled by the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), a non-profit organization.

How to get help

A chance to help someone suffering in silence from an eating disorder is exactly the reason Wilkerson is sharing her story.

“Who would have thought that just me, regular old me, could now be someone that people can identify with, that people want to talk to about this, who could potentially help someone,” she said.

Symptoms of anorexia include everything from extremely restricted eating and extreme thinness to an intense fear of gaining weight and a distorted body image.

Over time, symptoms may also include physical changes like brittle hair and nails and dry and yellowish skin and potentially deadly complications like brain and heart damage, according to the NIMH.

People with bulimia nervosa may have symptoms like swollen salivary glands, a chronically inflamed and sore throat, severe hydration and acid reflux disorder, the NIMH reports.

Symptoms for binge-eating disorder can include eating fast during binge episodes, eating until a person is uncomfortably full and eating alone or in secret.

Recovery from an eating disorder requires a team approach that includes the support of everyone from family and friends to mental health professionals and medical doctors.

If you want to help someone who may have an eating disorder, these four steps are recommended by the American Psychiatric Association (APA).

1. Be empathic, but clear.

2. List signs or behaviors you have noticed and are concerned about.

3. Help locate a treatment provider and offer to go with your friend or relative to an evaluation.

4. Be prepared that the affected individual may be uncertain about seeking treatment.

For more information on eating disorders, including warning signs and how to find support and help, visit the National Eating Disorders Association.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.