Scoreboard roundup — 3/29/19

Sports News Scoreboard roundup -- 3/29/19 https://linewsradio.com/scoreboard-roundup-3-29-19/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/sports-news/

iStock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Friday’s sports events:

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Toronto 6, Detroit 0
Tampa Bay 4, Houston 2
L.A. Angels 6, Oakland 2
Boston 7, Seattle 6

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Colorado 6, Miami 1
St. Louis 9, Milwaukee 5
San Diego 4, San Francisco 1
Arizona 5, L.A. Dodgers 4, 13 Innings

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION
Boston 114, Indiana 112
Portland 118, Atlanta 98
OT Minnesota 131, Golden State 130
Denver 115, Oklahoma City 105
Utah 128, Washington 124
L.A. Lakers 129, Charlotte 115

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
N.Y. Rangers 4, St. Louis 2
Nashville 3, Pittsburgh 1
Detroit 4, New Jersey 0
Calgary 6, Anaheim 1
SO Colorado 3, Arizona 2
Minnesota 3, Vegas 2

TOP 25 COLLEGE BASKETBALL
(1) Duke 75, (16) Virginia Tech 73
(14) Auburn 97, (3) North Carolina 80
(5) Michigan St. 80, (12) LSU 63
(7) Kentucky 62, (11) Houston 58

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
Toronto 4, New York City 0

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 30 Mar 2019

Teen dies from parasitic infection related to pork tapeworm

Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesBY DR. JAMIE FELZER AND DR. ASHLEY KNIGHT-GREENFIELD

(NEW YORK) — A report published Friday details a severe case in which a tapeworm infected an 18-year-old Indian boy’s brain, eventually leading to his death two weeks after he was admitted into an emergency room.

The infection, called cysticercosis, is caused by the larva of a parasite called Taenia solium — the pork tapeworm — which create cysts in various parts of the body. In the United States, there are about 1,000 hospitalizations from the infection every year. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers the disease one of five neglected parasitic infections that are in need of public health efforts to improve monitoring, prevention and treatment.

Here’s what need to know about cysticercosis and the parasite that causes it.

The infection is transmitted by the larva of the tapeworm

Cysticercosis is transmitted via infected human feces containing the microscopic eggs of the T. solium tapeworm. One way this can happen is from being infected by the tapeworm — called taeniasis — then shedding the eggs in stool. If the eggs make it to the person’s food or another person’s food, then that person is at risk of cysticercosis, which causes the cysts to develop anywhere in the body, including the muscles, heart, eyes, brain or spinal cord. Although pork itself cannot give a person cysticercosis, pork that’s not cooked properly can pass on the taeniasis.

The parasite mostly appears in underdeveloped countries

T. solium is most commonly found in Latin America, Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, where there is poorer sanitation and pigs are more likely to come into contact with human feces. As many as 8.3 million people in these regions are estimated to be suffering from neurocysticercosis, the version of the disease that affects the brain and spinal cord, according to the World Health Organization. The 18-year-old boy described in the report also had neurocysticercosis.

In the U.S., approximately 2,000 people are hospitalized each year due to neurocysticercosis. Although most cases of the disease in the U.S. occur in those traveling from other countries, up to 15% of those who die from cysticercosis have never left the country. It is estimated that about 2% of emergency room visits for seizures were due to neurocysticercosis.

The most severe symptoms are actually pretty rare

Symptoms of cysticercosis depend on the location and size of the cysts, and can range from no symptoms at all to headaches, seizures, stroke or death.

Neurocysticercosis is the most severe form of the infection, and up to 49% of people with it experience recurrent seizures four years after infection. It’s also the most common cause of seizures worldwide. The Indian boy who died experienced uncontrollable seizures despite treatment with high-dose steroids and anti-seizure medications.

Neurocysticercosis can be diagnosed with brain scans, but not everyone has access

Diagnosing neurocysticercosis usually involves spotting the cysts through brain scans, such as a CAT scan or MRI. Although this can easily be done in the U.S. and other developed countries, it’s more difficult in the rural areas of underdeveloped countries where there is a lack of resources and a high amount of cases. Blood tests can also help identify if a person is infected elsewhere in the body. If a person is diagnosed with cysticercosis, it is important to test other household members as well, since they are at much higher risk of becoming infected. Tests will determine if they have the tapeworm, cysts or are all clear.

Treatment of the cysts is a process that depends on the severity of the disease

Depending on the symptoms and distribution of the cysts in the body, treatment will usually focus on controlling the symptoms of the infection first, including the seizures and swelling of the brain. This might involve administering anti-seizure medications or steroids.

Doctors might administer antiparasitic medications; however, this isn’t done until the symptoms are under control because these medicines could worsen the condition. The boy described in the report, for example, couldn’t be given antiparasitic medications because there was too much inflammation in his brain.

Occasionally, the patient might need brain surgery.

You can avoid getting infected by taking these simple steps, especially when traveling abroad

Wash your hands. Scrub with soap for at least 20 seconds and then fully rinse with clean, running water.

Avoid eating foods that might be contaminated with human feces. Make sure all fresh foods are thoroughly washed in clean water and that food handlers practice safe hygiene practices.

When traveling to developing countries, drink only bottled or boiled water, or filter your water through a filter 1 micron or less and use iodine tablets.

Jamie Felzer, MD, MPH, is an internal medicine resident at Scripps Clinic in San Diego and Ashley Knight-Greenfield, MD, is a diagnostic radiology resident at New York-Presbyterian and Weill Cornell Medicine. Both are members of ABC News’ Medical Unit.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Trump cuts all direct assistance to Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala

WORLD NEWS Trump cuts all direct assistance to Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala  https://linewsradio.com/trump-cuts-all-direct-assistance-to-honduras-el-salvador-guatemala/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

iStock(WASHINGTON) — In a stunning about-face, State Department officials said President Donald Trump is cutting off all direct assistance to the so-called Northern Triangle countries of El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala.

“At the Secretary’s instruction, we are carrying out the President’s direction and ending FY [fiscal year] 2017 and FY 2018 foreign assistance programs for the Northern Triangle,” a State Department spokesperson told ABC News, referring to U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. “We will be engaging Congress as part of this process.”

These three countries are the primary source of migrants to the U.S., but for years the U.S. has worked with them to stabilize their political environments and economies, and end violence and corruption so that migrants wouldn’t leave in the first place.

Trump hinted at the cuts earlier on Friday, telling reporters, “I’ve ended payments to Guatemala, to Honduras, and to El Salvador. No money goes there anymore.”

While the president has threatened these cuts before, this time the administration is actually following through.

Trump said the funds totaled $500 million, but it wasn’t clear Friday if that figure was accurate. The State Department announced in December that the U.S. would mobilize $5.8 billion in public and private investments to these three countries.

“We’re not paying them anymore, because they haven’t done a thing for us,” he added.

His senior-most advisers, however, have carried a very different tune, talking very often about the importance of this assistance to stem the flow of illegal immigration.

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen was in Mexico and Honduras this week meeting with their leadership to sign new partnership agreements. Pompeo testified before the House of Representatives on Wednesday about the administration’s efforts, saying the president had instructed him and Nielsen to use U.S. funding to “develop a set of programs that reward effective outcomes, that reward good leadership, that get us to a place where we actually achieve the outcomes.”

In a speech in Brazil last June, Vice President Mike Pence touted the “significant resources” the administration was putting toward this effort, though much of those resources were allocated under former President Barack Obama’s administration.

“The United States of America has never been more committed to strengthening our partnership with the nations in the Northern Triangle to help … tackle the problems facing our shared neighborhood,” Pence said in October when hosting leaders from the Northern Triangle and Mexico at the State Department with Pompeo.

Trump’s previous threats to pull the plug, however, had often left U.S. officials scratching their heads and straining to explain why these funds described as key to stemming migration would be cut off — as punishment for not stemming migration.

When Pompeo was challenged on the president’s previous threatening tweets on Wednesday, he told Congress, “I’m not going to comment on my evaluation. You asked me about the U.S. policy, and I’ve done my level-best to articulate it.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 30 Mar 2019

The 20-year hunt for a stolen Picasso painting was found by an Amsterdam art detective

WORLD NEWS The 20-year hunt for a stolen Picasso painting was found by an Amsterdam art detective  https://linewsradio.com/the-20-year-hunt-for-a-stolen-picasso-painting-was-found-by-an-amsterdam-art-detective/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

iStock/Ekspansio(AMSTERDAM) — What would be your reaction if two men knocked on your door and handed you one of the most amazing paintings of Spanish artist Pablo Picasso?

This bizarre — though beautiful — moment happened to the respected Dutch art detective, Arthur Brand earlier this month and therefore resolving a 20-year-old grand larceny cold case.

“When I unwrapped the painting, I was speechless. Colors of Picasso were astonishing me.” Brand told to ABC News, describing one of the most important moments of his professional life.

In 1980, Sheikh Abdul Mohsen Abdulmalik Al-Sheikh purchased Picasso’s “Buste de Femme” for $4.5 million. The Saudi Prince kept the 1938 masterpiece of Picasso’s muse under lock and key aboard his $50 million yacht in the Antibes — an exclusive resort on the French Riviera — until March 11, 1999 when it was stolen.

Despite the $450,000 reward Al-Sheikh offered for its return, the painting was never recovered until 20 years later due to the work of Brand.

Brand, 48, began his career in 2002 and started building a network of informants, collectors, police, and international criminals. The veteran detective was close to former international smuggler Michel van Rijn, who has since collaborated with the police as an informant.

Brand gained notary as an art detective after negotiating with two different criminal organizations to secure the return of a Salvador Dali surrealist painting called Adolescence (1941) and Tamara de Lempicka’s La Musicienne (1929). The two paintings were stolen from a Dutch museum by a masked gang in 2009.

A collector himself, Brand said that 30 percent of art pieces sold are fake.

As for “Buste de Femme,” the masterpiece was a part of the private collection of Picasso and hung inside his house in France until his death in 1971.

“Only few pictures of this painting existed and it was before the era of Internet,” said Brand, who found out about the painting’s theft in 2015.

“I made few phone calls to my sources to let them know I would like to help returning the painting to the legal market.

Last week, Brand received a phone call from the alleged owners of the painting. Two men showed up to Brand’s house in Amsterdam, Netherlands, with the $28 million-valued Picasso wrapped in garbage bags, he said.

Within the same week, experts from the New York-based Pace Gallery flew to Amsterdam to authenticate the masterpiece. Insurance will decide the possible conditions of returning the painting to the Al-Sheikh.

In possession of the painting for one night, Brand, could not resist and hanging it on his own wall, he said.

Looking at the painting while smoking a cigarette on his balcony for few hours, Brand’s house became the most expensive in Amsterdam as he admitted to ABC News.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 29 Mar 2019

Baby boom in the classroom: Nearly half of elementary school’s teachers announce pregnancies

USD 265 Goddard Public Schools(GODDARD, Kan.) —  One plus one equals two and seven teachers pregnant at one elementary school equals a baby boom.

Seven of the 15 classroom teachers at Oak Street Elementary School in Goddard, Kansas, told the school’s principal during this school year that they are pregnant.

“I was very excited, obviously, because this is great news,” said Ashley Miller, the school’s principal. “After the third one I was a little in shock, the fourth one I was really in shock, the fifth one I didn’t know what to say and by the seventh one I had to remember to congratulate her because my first words were, ‘Are you kidding me?'”

Miller, a 20-year veteran of the elementary school added, “I have never in my life had this many pregnant people in the building. Never happened.”

Two of the seven teachers gave birth to their babies, two healthy girls, this week, one on Wednesday and one on Thursday, according to Miller.

Luckily for Miller, the teachers’ pregnancies are spread out so not all seven teachers will be on maternity leave at once. The school is using substitute teachers to fill their spots while they are on leave.

The final three babies are due in October.

The school is already a tight-knit community and the experience of going through pregnancies together has bonded them even more, both Miller and the teachers say.

“It’s so much fun to see the other mommies in the hall and we’re asking each other, ‘How do you feel,’” said Kelli Jo Sheahon, a fourth-grade teacher expecting twins in October. “I don’t know that a lot of other people get that experience at work.”

The cafeteria staff have taken to keeping a stash of crackers in the kitchen for the teachers, according to Sheahon, who was the sixth teacher to tell Miller her pregnancy news.

Kaylee Busick, a first-grade teacher who is due in July with a boy, was the fourth teacher to reveal her pregnancy news.

“I remember the [third teacher] was like, ‘Oh, Miller is going to kill you when she finds out,'” Busick said with a laugh. “And then other people told after me so I felt better.”

At least three of the teachers are planning to give birth at the same hospital. Their kids will all likely enter kindergarten at Oak Street Elementary School together in a few years.

“Some of us have had kids who have all been through Oak Street,” Miller said. “We do a lot of evening activities [together] so this place is crazy when we do that because we all bring our kids.”

The school was recently approved for a renovation that will start in May, at the end of the school year. Miller said she wishes they had included a nursery in the renovation, but may still ask for one.

“I don’t think I’m going to get that but I’ll always ask,” said Miller, who also joked (but not really) that the school needs to be sponsored by a diaper company.

The teachers meanwhile said they have already received their fill of “it must be in the water” jokes.

“I had someone tell me before I announced, ‘Don’t drink the water,’ and in my mind I was like, ‘Too late,'” recalled Sheahon.

The teachers’ baby boom comes the same week as nine nurses — all of whom work in labor and delivery — made headlines by being pregnant and all due between April and July this year. In a North Carolina town, seven women married to firefighters at one fire station are all pregnant and due between now and September.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Ginobili’s Spurs jersey retired during emotional ceremony

Sports News Ginobili's Spurs jersey retired during emotional ceremony https://linewsradio.com/ginobilis-spurs-jersey-retired-during-emotional-ceremony/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/sports-news/

Ronald Cortes/Getty Images(SAN ANTONIO) — There was likely not a dry eye at the AT&T Center in San Antonio Thursday night. The Spurs held an emotional ceremony to retire Manu Ginobili’s No. 20 jersey after the team’s 116-110 victory over the Cleveland Cavaliers.

During the ceremony, former Spurs players Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, Fabricio Oberto joined coach Gregg Popovich to give speeches in celebration of the future Hall of Fame guard’s career, according to ESPN.

For his own part, Ginobili, 41, delivered a speech partially in English and partially in Spanish, ESPN reported.

“I’m telling you, I’m one of the lucky ones,” Ginobili said during Thursday’s heartfelt ceremony. “I’ve been dealt amazing cards. I just had to play them OK. That was all I had to do.”

Fans from all over the world, former teammates and coaches all packed into the arena to witness the celebration for Ginobili. At breaks in the game, highlights of Ginobili’s 23-season career were played on the scoreboard.

Ginobili, whose achievements included four NBA titles, an Olympic gold medal for Argentina and a EuroLeague MVP award, announced his retirement via Twitter last August.
 
Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 29 Mar 2019

Walgreens to sell CBD products in stores: What to know about the buzzy wellness trend

Dmitry_Tishchenko/iStock(NEW YORK) — Products containing CBD — the buzzy cannabinoid used in everything from lotions to gumdrops — will soon be showing up on the shelves of Walgreens stores across the country.

The retail chain announced Thursday it will begin offering certain products containing CBD, cannabidiol, in nearly 1,500 Walgreens stores in Oregon, Colorado, New Mexico, Kentucky, Tennessee, Vermont, South Carolina, Illinois and Indiana.

The CBD-related items offered in Walgreens stores will be topical creams, patches and sprays. The products will be “non-THC containing,” according to the company.

“This product offering is in line with our efforts to provide a wider range of accessible health and wellbeing products and services to best meet the needs and preferences of our customers,” Walgreens said in a statement.

Another retail giant, CVS, announced last week that it also will begin slowly rolling out CBD products in some of its stores.

“Anecdotally, we’ve heard from our customers that have used those products that, gee, it’s helped with pain relief for arthritis and other ailments,” CVS CEO Larry Merlo said in a CNBC interview. “We’re going to walk slowly, but we think this is something customers are going to be looking for as part of the health offering.”

With CBD becoming more easily available on the marketplace — Soul Cycle is now selling it too — and consumers have questions.

Here is what to know about CBD, from the health benefits to whether it’s legal to use.

What is a Cannabinoid?

There are three types of cannabinoids. Endocannabinoids, which are produced naturally in the body; man-made cannabinoids, which can be really dangerous; and the most popular, cannabinoids such as THC and CBD, which come from the marijuana plant.

All three kinds of cannabinoids bind to cannabinoid receptors in the body. CB1 receptors, located primarily in the brain, are believed to control mood, memory, sleep, appetite and pain. CB2 receptors are located in parts of the body that produce blood cells, such as the spleen, and are believed to affect inflammation.

What is CBD?

CBD is short for cannabidiol, and it’s one chemical compound found in the Cannabis sativa plant — in both marijuana and hemp. CBD differs from THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) because it doesn’t cause the intoxicating, euphoric “high” associated with marijuana.

What are the health benefits?

Though there are claims of health benefits wherever you go, the science isn’t quite there yet — most of the research that has found benefits was done on animals. That’s because researching marijuana legally is difficult. Marijuana is a schedule I controlled substance, defined as having “no accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.”

Still, there’s a lot of anecdotal evidence.

In June 2018, the FDA approved a CBD-containing seizure medication called Epidiolex, which can be used for the uncontrollable seizures caused by diseases such as Dravet Syndrome, a seizure disorder that can be uncontrollable with typical medications.

One of the most common uses of the drug, which is in a form called Dronabinol, is FDA-approved for chemo related nausea and vomiting. It is also used to help with appetite stimulation, especially in the cancer or AIDS population.

CBD is also widely used to treat pain and anxiety. Scientists are quick to say they are still unsure of the way this works, but they believe it may be due to CBD altering some brain pathways linked to these symptoms.

In skin care, CBD has been reported to treat itchiness, acne and allergic dermatitis — a skin reaction to allergies. While the mechanisms here are also unknown, scientists think it may be due to cannabinoid receptors in the skin which, when activated, work to reduce inflammation and arthritis.

As states move to legalize these compounds to the public, all of these claims will need to be studied.

How do people use CBD?

Many CBD products are sold as oils or balms, but they are also available in lotions, facial serums, lozenges or as part of cocktails. Although manufacturers claim there is an appropriate dose for the products they make, that is up for debate. The nutrition and supplement business, in general, is highly unregulated and this includes CBD products, even in states with legal marijuana.

What are the risks?

Both the benefits and risks of CBD lack substantiated research. As with any supplement, there is always a risk for unintended drug interaction. A small number of studies on animals indicate that CBD could potentially affect cell health and the breakdown of drugs in the liver. In humans, a study that investigated CBD’s effect on seizures noted side effects including diarrhea, vomiting, fatigue and increased sleepiness.

Why is it popular now?

In a word: marketing.

Similar to vitamin C and kale, CBD is undergoing a rise to fame just similar to the way that kale has been labeled a “superfood,” which is a non-medical buzzword. And with celebrities publicizing anecdotal benefits, there’s been easing tension surrounding CBD’s stigma.

But most importantly, as mentioned, it’s being marketed as a fix for various ailments.

Is it legal to use CBD?

Not Exactly. As mentioned, marijuana is still a schedule I substance, and that includes CBD.

The issue of legality comes down to how the CBD is obtained. The THC portions of the cannabis plant include the flowering tops (buds), the leaves and the resin of the plant. The remainder — the stalks and sterilized seeds — is where most CBD comes from. However, producers can also obtain it from the THC portions in which case it might yield a mixture of THC and CBD.

According to Katherine Pfaff, a spokesperson for the DEA, “If the product does cause THC to enter the human body and/or contains greater than 0.3 percent of THC, it is an illegal substance that may not be manufactured, sold or consumed in the United States. If, however, the product does not cause THC to enter the human body and contains less than 0.3 percent THC, it is a non-controlled substance that may lawfully be sold.”

The National Institutes of Health lists over 150 studies involving CBD as a treatment for various diseases. The World Health Organization concluded in a press release that CBD is not harmful. And in the sports world, the World Anti-Doping Agency removed it from its prohibited substances list.

To top this off, CBD is widely available online as well as in countless bars and coffee shops nationwide. This legal ambiguity undoubtedly confuses consumers, and it won’t change until further research trickles in.

The bottom line is there are countless claims regarding CBD’s ability to cure common ailments and there are also many places to buy CBD over the counter. But while there are many people willing to answer for CBD, the reality is there are still many questions that the industry itself needs to answer.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Doctors complete first living kidney transplant from one HIV-positive person to another

Morsa Images/iStock(BALTIMORE) — A team of doctors has performed a kidney transplant for the first time ever from one person living with HIV to another.

The ground-breaking operation was completed Monday by a multidisciplinary team from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md. The transplant donor and the anonymous recipient, who are both HIV-positive, are said to be doing well.

“This is the first time someone living with HIV has been allowed to donate a kidney, ever, in the world, and that’s huge,” Dr. Dorry Segev, a professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a statement Thursday. “A disease that was a death sentence in the 1980s has become one so well-controlled that those living with HIV can now save lives with kidney donation — that’s incredible.”

Recent research conducted by Segev and his colleagues on over 40,000 HIV-positive individuals showed that the new antiretroviral drugs, which suppress the AIDS-causing virus, are safe for the kidney, and that people living with well-controlled HIV are healthy enough to donate kidneys and face basically the same risks as those who don’t have HIV.

“As patients waiting for a transplant see that we’re working with as many donors as possible to save as many lives as possible, we’re giving them hope,” Dr. Christine Durand, associate professor of medicine and oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a statement Thursday. “Every successful transplant shortens the wait list for all patients, no matter their HIV status.”

The HIV-positive donor, 35-year-old Nina Martinez, said she was inspired to participate in the clinical research after a friend became a living kidney donor.

“I bore witness to my friend providing a lifesaving transplant, and in watching her I knew that if there was a way for me to help someone else, I had to do it,” Martinez, a public health consultant in Atlanta, Ga., said in a statement Thursday. “Doing so under a research protocol was very comfortable for me.”

Losing a friend to kidney disease last year made Martinez even more determined to become a donor, she said.

“Other people living with HIV before me participated in clinical research so that I could not just survive but thrive,” she added. “It was my turn to do this, for both my friend that I cared about and all people waiting on a transplant.”

Martinez said she hopes the transplant will help lift the stigma still surrounding HIV.

“Some people believe that people living with HIV are ‘sick,’ or look unwell,” she said. “I want people to change what they believe they know about HIV. I don’t want to be anyone’s hero. I want to be someone’s example, someone’s reason to consider donating.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

With Temple University mumps outbreak expected to continue for ‘weeks,’ thousands receive vaccinations

Manjurul/iStock(PHILADELPHIA) — An ongoing outbreak of mumps at Temple University in Philadelphia has prompted more than 2,000 students to receive vaccinations or booster shots.

Philadelphia health officials told ABC News that there are a total of 108 cases of mumps associated with the Temple University outbreak so far, with 18 confirmed cases and 90 probable cases. The school did not previously require students to get vaccinated.

“These happen at universities across the country — not frequently — but it’s not unusual,” said James Garrow, the spokesperson for the Philadelphia Department of Public Health.

Mumps is commonly spread through “close personal contact” and “sharing things that have saliva on them,” Garrow said, noting that situations where large groups of students are living, eating and drinking together make them prime for an outbreak.

Garrow said that the department sent its first health alert about the outbreak to the medical community in Philadelphia on March 1.

Mumps is one of the three diseases that the Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) vaccine protects against. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends each person receive two doses: the first when a child is between 12 and 15 months old and the second dose between 4 and 6 years old. Students at post-high school educational institutions who have not been immunized should get two doses of the MMR vaccine, separated by at least 28 days, and adults who have not been immunized should get at least one MMR shot, according to the CDC.

Garrow said that even after completing those doses, it’s still possible to get infected by the mumps virus because the MMR vaccine is “excellent” for protecting against measles and rubella but only “really good” for protecting against the mumps, with a slightly lower immunity rate.

As such, the CDC recommends that anyone who is at risk of being exposed to mumps get a third booster vaccine. Temple University has been facilitating these boosters this week through vaccine drives on Wednesday and Friday.

The school released a statement calling Wednesday’s vaccine clinic “a tremendous success, with 2,285 vaccines administered.”

Many colleges and universities have long required incoming freshman to provide records showing that they had received two doses of the MMR vaccine — this was not the policy at Temple until this outbreak began, Garrow said. The school released a statement announcing its updated vaccination requirements on March 22, though it noted that they were not finalized.

“The policy is still under development. The goal is to draft the policy over the summer for rollout next academic year. The university fully expects the policy to be in accordance with best practices and applicable law. And accordingly, the university expects avenues for appropriate opt-out that will be spelled out when the policy is final,” the statement read.

As for the remainder of the outbreak, Garrow said that officials are “expecting it to continue,” due in part to mumps’ taking as many as three weeks to become symptomatic.

“The best way to stop the spread of mumps is for people who have those symptoms and feel sick to stay away from other people,” Garrow said, urging students to “wipe down surfaces” and “don’t share cups.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

With Temple University mumps outbreak expected to continue for ‘weeks,’ thousands receive vaccinations

Manjurul/iStock(PHILADELPHIA) — An ongoing outbreak of mumps at Temple University in Philadelphia has prompted more than 2,000 students to receive vaccinations or booster shots.

Philadelphia health officials told ABC News that there are a total of 108 cases of mumps associated with the Temple University outbreak so far, with 18 confirmed cases and 90 probable cases. The school did not previously require students to get vaccinated.

“These happen at universities across the country — not frequently — but it’s not unusual,” said James Garrow, the spokesperson for the Philadelphia Department of Public Health.

Mumps is commonly spread through “close personal contact” and “sharing things that have saliva on them,” Garrow said, noting that situations where large groups of students are living, eating and drinking together make them prime for an outbreak.

Garrow said that the department sent its first health alert about the outbreak to the medical community in Philadelphia on March 1.

Mumps is one of the three diseases that the Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) vaccine protects against. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends each person receive two doses: the first when a child is between 12 and 15 months old and the second dose between 4 and 6 years old. Students at post-high school educational institutions who have not been immunized should get two doses of the MMR vaccine, separated by at least 28 days, and adults who have not been immunized should get at least one MMR shot, according to the CDC.

Garrow said that even after completing those doses, it’s still possible to get infected by the mumps virus because the MMR vaccine is “excellent” for protecting against measles and rubella but only “really good” for protecting against the mumps, with a slightly lower immunity rate.

As such, the CDC recommends that anyone who is at risk of being exposed to mumps get a third booster vaccine. Temple University has been facilitating these boosters this week through vaccine drives on Wednesday and Friday.

The school released a statement calling Wednesday’s vaccine clinic “a tremendous success, with 2,285 vaccines administered.”

Many colleges and universities have long required incoming freshman to provide records showing that they had received two doses of the MMR vaccine — this was not the policy at Temple until this outbreak began, Garrow said. The school released a statement announcing its updated vaccination requirements on March 22, though it noted that they were not finalized.

“The policy is still under development. The goal is to draft the policy over the summer for rollout next academic year. The university fully expects the policy to be in accordance with best practices and applicable law. And accordingly, the university expects avenues for appropriate opt-out that will be spelled out when the policy is final,” the statement read.

As for the remainder of the outbreak, Garrow said that officials are “expecting it to continue,” due in part to mumps’ taking as many as three weeks to become symptomatic.

“The best way to stop the spread of mumps is for people who have those symptoms and feel sick to stay away from other people,” Garrow said, urging students to “wipe down surfaces” and “don’t share cups.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.