Gabrielle Union says she felt like a “failure” for having a daughter via surrogate

Entertainment News  Gabrielle Union says she felt like a "failure" for having a daughter via surrogate https://linewsradio.com/gabrielle-union-says-she-felt-like-a-failure-for-having-a-daughter-via-surrogate-2/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

Photo by Presley Ann/WireImage(LOS ANGELES) — Actress and new mom Gabrielle Union admits she felt like she was “surrendering to failure” when she decided to use a surrogate to have her first child.

Union, 46, welcomed her first child with husband Dwyane Wade, last November, and has been open about her struggles with infertility, multiple miscarriages and medical issues in the past.

Still, in a new interview with Women’s Health magazine, the actress admits that the “idea” of using a surrogate to welcome baby Kaavia James into the world was something she struggled to accept.

“There’s nothing more that I wanted than to cook my own baby,” Union said, adding that when it comes to surrogacy: “The idea of it felt like surrendering to failure.”

As someone in the spotlight, she adds that she was especially apprehensive about the public’s reaction to finding out she went with a surrogate.

“People want to see the bump, hear that you got hemorrhoids — they want to know you’re like them,” she said. “I was like ‘This is going to seem like the most Hollywood s*** ever. Will I be embraced as a mom?’ It’s terrifying.”

The actress also revealed how she picked her surrogate, saying, “Some people care about the race, religion, or food habits of their surrogate. I was like, ‘I want a reader.’”

One thing the Bring it On actress says she didn’t have any qualms about was becoming a first-time mom in her 40s, adding, “Any earlier and the FOMO would have greatly influenced how I parented.”

“Now I’m in the right mindset and mental space…I’m open to being the best mom I can be,” she said.

The new issue of Women’s Health magazine is now on newsstands nationwide.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Feb 2019

BAFTA suspends ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ director Bryan Singer’s nomination amid misconduct allegations

Entertainment News  BAFTA suspends 'Bohemian Rhapsody' director Bryan Singer's nomination amid misconduct allegations https://linewsradio.com/bafta-suspends-bohemian-rhapsody-director-bryan-singers-nomination-amid-misconduct-allegations/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

20th Century Fox(LONDON) — The British Academy of Film and Television Arts announced Wednesday that it’s suspending its nominations for Bohemian Rhapsody director Bryan Singer amid accusations that he sexually assaulted minors.

“In light of recent very serious allegations, BAFTA has informed Bryan Singer that his nomination for Bohemian Rhapsody has been suspended, effective immediately,” the British Academy said in a statement.

“BAFTA considers the alleged behavior completely unacceptable and incompatible with its values. This has led to Mr. Singer’s suspended nomination,” the statement continues. “BAFTA notes Mr. Singer’s denial of the allegations. The suspension of his nomination will therefore remain in place until the outcome of the allegations has been resolved.”

Bohemian Rhapsody received a total of seven BAFTA film nominations, all of which remain in place. However, Singer’s name, which appeared alongside Graham King and Anthony McCarten in the best British film nomination, has been removed.  The awards are this Sunday in London.

Singer was fired from Bohemian Rhapsody two weeks before the scheduled end of shooting over what the studio called “unexplained absences.” After a hiatus in filming, actor/director Dexter Fletcher took the reins but due to union regulations, Singer remains the only credited director on the project. As he worked on the film, Singer was accused by several men of sexual assault and other misdeeds throughout his career. Singer has denied the accusations.

Further allegations of sexual assault and misconduct were made against Singer in a piece in The Atlantic a couple of weeks ago, prompting the film’s removal as a best original film nominee at this year’s GLAAD Media Awards. Singer has denied those claims as well, calling the article a “homophobic smear piece” that was “conveniently timed” to take advantage of Bohemian Rhapsody‘s success.

Singer is still expected to make some $40 million from Bohemian Rhapsody.

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Posted On 07 Feb 2019

Explaining Trump’s talk of ‘late-term abortions’ during State of the Union

Andy445/iStock(NEW YORK) — President Donald Trump brought up “late-term abortions” during the 2019 State of the Union, and it’s left doctors scratching their heads.

“As a board-certified Ob-Gyn, I wish people understood that the term ‘late-term abortion’ is not remotely a medical term. In fact, even Ob-Gyns don’t know what people are referring to when we hear this term,” said ABC News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jen Ashton.

The phrase has come up recently as a result of the passage of a law in New York concerning reproductive rights in the state, as well as comments made by the now-embattled governor of Virginia describing a hypothetical situation.

During his speech Tuesday night, Trump described how the New York law would “allow a baby to be ripped from the mother’s womb moments before birth” and said that “these are living, feeling, beautiful, babies who will never get the chance to share their love and dreams with the world.”

That description made no mention about the rare circumstances that would lead to an abortion happening later in a pregnancy — which includes spinal and genetic anomalies that would prevent a viable life, rather than just a decision by the mother that she does not want the child — and the misconception has caused outrage and misunderstanding that doctors have tried to clear up.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) released a fact sheet in early February about abortions that take place later in a pregnancy. It begins by noting that “politicians should never interfere in the patient-physician relationship.”

Dr. Sarah Horvath, an OB-GYN who is in a family planning fellowship at ACOG, told ABC News that the phrase “late-term abortion” is “inaccurate and purposefully confusing language that’s used for political reasons.”

Why abortions take place later in pregnancies

Horvath said that there is no set time limit for what is considered “late” in a pregnancy. The average pregnancy spans 40 weeks.

States differ as to whether or not they set a time limit — typically either 20 or 24 weeks — as to when an abortion can be obtained, with exceptions, or if their limit is set to fetus “viability” which allows for individual case considerations to be taken into account.

Ashton explained that “there is a difference between first trimester terminations (up to 12 to 13 weeks) and second trimester terminations (generally up to 24 weeks).”

“In general, we use 24 weeks as the threshold for viability: the age at which a fetus can survive outside the uterus. But there are cases in which fetuses at 23 weeks can survive, and those in which fetuses of 25 weeks do not,” Ashton said.

More conservative states have been pushing for so-called “heartbeat” bills, where an abortion is banned, with exceptions, once a fetal heartbeat can be detected, which can occur as early as six weeks into a pregnancy when some women may not even know that they are pregnant.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in 2015 that 1.3 percent of abortions took place at or after the 21st week of a pregnancy, and Horvath said that fewer than 1 percent of abortions happen after 24 weeks of a pregnancy.

“In terms of second trimester terminations, there are often cases where serious anomalies are not detected in the fetus until the second trimester. There are also cases in which the life or medical condition of the woman is at serious risk if the pregnancy were to continue,” Ashton said.

Horvath said that she has had patients who face the “devastating” situation of having an abortion later in their pregnancy, including one patient who lived in New York.

Horvath described how the patient, whose name she did not share, had a “very wanted pregnancy” and everything “looked like it was going to be a normal pregnancy” until the 26th week. It was at that point that the woman was diagnosed with a “lethal fetal skeletal anomaly.”

“It develops later in pregnancy. She had an ultrasound at 20 weeks that had shown a healthy pregnancy and it was only after 24 weeks that this was actually diagnosed,” Horvath said of the situation. “This is completely incompatible with life outside the uterus.”

The new law in New York

The situation with this patient occurred before New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed the Reproductive Health Act into law on Jan. 22 of this year. The law adjusted the legal framework for abortions in the state, setting it to a fetus viability standard as opposed to a set gestational age, and changing laws that criminalized certain later abortions.

Horvath said that the viability standard “is a much more accurate way of determining whether a fetus can live outside of the uterus.”

The ACOG, which is a nonprofit association with more than 58,000 members, uses viability as their standard as well.

“Viability is the capacity of the fetus for sustained survival outside the woman’s uterus. Whether or not this capacity exists is a medical determination, may vary with each pregnancy and is a matter of judgement of the responsible health care provider,” the ACOG wrote in a statement about their position on abortion.

In the case of the patient Horvath treated, because the new law was not yet in place in New York, and because when she was diagnosed with the lethal fetal skeletal anomaly her own life was not in danger, she “had no ability to obtain abortion care in her home state.”

“She was forced to continue to carry a pregnancy that she knew was never going to be able to survive and become a healthy baby,” Horvath said. “Several weeks later it demised in utero and she was then able to have the procedure to remove it from her uterus.”

The difference that the new law would have made in that patient’s case, Horvath said, was that she would have been able to be treated in her home state and not have to “wait with the knowledge that she was carrying a doomed pregnancy.”

“It’s really important to remember that every one of these situations is complicated and difficult for the woman and that’s why it’s much better that its left for her to discuss with her physician and the people in her life who can love her and support her and help her make the right decision for her,” Horvath said.

Political posturing

While the passage of the law in New York has prompted some discussion about abortion laws, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, who previously worked as a pediatric neurologist before entering politics, also waded into the fray by talking about the issue during an appearance on a radio show.

During the State of the Union, Trump said “the governor of Virginia … stated he would execute a baby after birth.” Trump also said that the law in New York would “allow a baby to be ripped from the mother’s womb moments before birth.”

Horvath said that Trump’s characterizations are inaccurate.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Report: Rockets land Iman Shumpert in three-way trade with Kings, Cavaliers

Sports News Report: Rockets land Iman Shumpert in three-way trade with Kings, Cavaliers https://linewsradio.com/report-rockets-land-iman-shumpert-in-three-way-trade-with-kings-cavaliers/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/sports-news/

Leon Halip/Getty Images(HOUSTON) — The Houston Rockets have reportedly landed guard Iman Shumpert from the Sacramento Kings in a three-team trade that also involves the Cleveland Cavaliers.

As part of the deal, the Rockets will send guard Brandon Knight and forward Marquese Chriss, along with a 2019 first-round pick, to the Cavaliers, league sources tell ESPN.

Cleveland, meanwhile, will send guard Alec Burks to Sacramento, while Cavs guards Nik Stauskas and Wade Baldwin go to Houston, according to the sources.

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Posted On 07 Feb 2019

Liam Neeson reportedly scraps ‘Late Show’ appearance following racial comments

Entertainment News  Liam Neeson reportedly scraps 'Late Show' appearance following racial comments https://linewsradio.com/liam-neeson-reportedly-scraps-late-show-appearance-following-racial-comments/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

ABC(NEW YORK) — Liam Neeson has reportedly canceled his scheduled appearance on Friday’s The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, a source tells The Wrap.

The cancellation comes on the heels of Neeson’s comments during a recent interview with the British paper The Independent that he wanted to “unleash physical violence” against black men after a close friend revealed she had been brutally raped by one decades ago.

Neeson clarified his remarks to Good Morning America‘s Robin Roberts on Tuesday, insisting that he’s “not a racist,” adding that if his friend has said her attacker had been white, or Scottish, or any other ethnicity, he would have searched for someone who fit that description.

He also told Roberts that the lesson he wants people to take away from the controversial statements is that he learned, “Violence begets violence. Bigotry begets bigotry.”

Glenn Close, a best actress Oscar nominee for her role in The Wife, will appear on The Late Show in Neeson’s place, according to the insider.

Neeson attended the Tuesday New York City premiere of his film Cold Pursuit, opening nationwide on Friday, but the red carpet portion of the evening prior to the movie was canceled.

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Posted On 07 Feb 2019

Last year’s Oscar winners returning for host-free telecast

Entertainment News  Last year's Oscar winners returning for host-free telecast https://linewsradio.com/last-years-oscar-winners-returning-for-host-free-telecast/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

AMPAS(LOS ANGELES) — The upcoming 91st Oscars may be bucking tradition by going host-less, but at least one ritual will remain intact: All four of last year’s Oscar-winning actors are expected to present awards.

In an apparent about-face, the Academy tweeted on Wednesday that Gary Oldman, Allison Janney, Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell have all been invited to present.

Initially, reps for Janney and Rockwell were told that the two performers would not be part of this year’s ceremony, sources told The Hollywood Reporter, reportedly because the producers wanted to “shake things up.”

The 91st Academy Awards air February 24 on ABC.

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Posted On 07 Feb 2019

Bulls acquire Otto Porter Jr. in trade with Wizards

Sports News Bulls acquire Otto Porter Jr. in trade with Wizards https://linewsradio.com/bulls-acquire-otto-porter-jr-in-trade-with-wizards/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/sports-news/

Tar_Heel_Rob/iStock(CHICAGO) — The Chicago Bulls have acquired Otto Porter Jr. from the Washington Wizards, the teams announced Wednesday night.

In exchange for the 25-year-old forward, the Bulls sent forwards Jabari Parker and Bobby Porti to the Wizards. Chicago also gave Washington a protected 2023 second-round draft pick.

Porter was drafted by the Wizards in 2013. Since then, he has played 384 games, averaging 10.7 points, 5.0 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 1.18 steals per game.

This season, he’s played 41 games and has averaged 12.6 points, 5.6 rebounds and 2.0 assists.

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Posted On 07 Feb 2019

Gabrielle Union says she felt like a ‘failure’ for having a daughter via surrogate

Roy Rochlin/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Actress and new mom Gabrielle Union admits she felt like she was “surrendering to failure” when she decided to use a surrogate to welcome her first child into the world.

Union, 46, welcomed her first child with husband Dwyane Wade, last November, and has been open about her struggles with infertility, multiple miscarriages, Adenomyosis diagnosis and more in the past.

Still, in a new interview with Women’s Health magazine, the actress admits that the “idea” of using a surrogate to welcome baby Kaavia James into the world was something she struggled to accept.

“There’s nothing more that I wanted than to cook my own baby,” Union said, adding that when it comes to surrogacy: “The idea of it felt like surrendering to failure.”

As someone in the spotlight, she adds that she was especially apprehensive about the public’s reaction to finding out she went with a surrogate.

“People want to see the bump, hear that you got hemorrhoids — they want to know you’re like them,” she said. “I was like ‘This is going to seem like the most Hollywood s*** ever. Will I be embraced as a mom?’ It’s terrifying.”

The actress also revealed how she picked her surrogate, saying, “Some people care about the race, religion, or food habits of their surrogate. I was like, ‘I want a reader.’”

One thing the Bring it On actress says she didn’t have any qualms about was becoming a first-time mom in her 40s, saying that, “Any earlier and the FOMO would have greatly influenced how I parented.”

“Now I’m in the right mindset and mental space, and I’m open to being the best mom I can be,” she said.

The new issue of Women’s Health magazine is now on newsstands nationwide.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Girl, 5, pulled from rubble 18 hours after building collapse in Istanbul

WORLD NEWS Girl, 5, pulled from rubble 18 hours after building collapse in Istanbul  https://linewsradio.com/girl-5-pulled-from-rubble-18-hours-after-building-collapse-in-istanbul/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

omersukrugoksu/iStock(LONDON) — A 5-year-old girl was pulled from a massive pile of rubble on Thursday in Istanbul, some 18 hours after a 14-unit apartment building collapsed and killed at least three others.

The eight-floor building in which the girl lived collapsed around 4 p.m. local time in the Turkish capital’s Kartal district.

Three people were found dead after the structure fell, and three more were seriously injured, officials confirmed.

Video footage shows Havva Tekgoz, 5, being uncovered from rubble by rescuers before she’s taken away on a stretch. A 9-year-old boy also was rescued overnight.

Authorities are investigating the cause of the collapse.

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Posted On 07 Feb 2019

2018 makes last five years the warmest in history, scientists say

WORLD NEWS 2018 makes last five years the warmest in history, scientists say  https://linewsradio.com/2018-makes-last-five-years-the-warmest-in-history-scientists-say/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

batuhan toker/iStock(WASHINGTON) — The past five years are the warmest in recorded history, scientists from NASA and NOAA announced Wednesday, part of a continued trend of higher temperatures around the world.

“2018 is yet again an extremely warm year on top of a long-term global warming trend,” said Goddard Institute for Space Studies Director Gavin Schmidt.

The 2018 data shows the last five years are now the warmest since 1880, according to government scientists.

Despite continued data showing the impacts of climate change it did not come up in President Donald Trump’s State of the Union message Tuesday night and has not been a priority for the administration.

In the U.S., temperatures in the southwest and parts of the East coast ranked among the warmest in history, which contributed to an entrenched drought in the southwest with overall temperatures in the country about 1.5 degrees above the 20th-century average.

Overall temperatures around the world were 1.5 degrees warmer than mean temperatures from 1951 to 1980, according to scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York.

The average global surface temperature has risen about 2 degrees Fahrenheit since the 1880s, which is largely driven by releases of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases by human activities.

Climate scientists around the world have raised the alarm about the danger of climate change and a warming climate in the last year. A major climate report from a panel of the United Nations found time is running out to drastically reduce emissions and slow warming temperatures and a U.S. government report detailed risks to various parts of the U.S. from extreme weather events and threats to the economy.

The Trump administration has downplayed threats from climate change and point out that the U.S. has reduced its carbon dioxide emissions in recent years. But scientists say that won’t directly impact global temperatures because emissions all mix in the atmosphere and worldwide emissions are still going up.

“We still collectively have our foot on that accelerator and while there are some indications in some parts of the world that people are working quite hard to reduce those emissions, collectively we are not doing so, so when you’re trying to predict what happened to the climate its always a global issue,” Schmidt said on a call with reporters.

The night after Trump delivered his State of the Union speech, Democrats held two hearings to highlight their focus on putting the issue back on the agenda. Two House committees held concurrent hearings on climate change Wednesday, the first time in years each committee has taken on the topic.

“Today we turn the page on this Committee from climate denial to climate action. The Democratic majority is here to listen to the people. To work for the people. To hear from Americans across the country, from all walks of life, whose experiences emphasize the need to address this crisis,” House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Raul Grijalva, D-New Mexico, said in his opening statement.

“The rest of the world understands the urgent need to take action on climate change. The Trump administration chooses to mock science and mislead the public about what our country will look like if we do nothing,” Grijalva continued.

Ranking Member Rob Bishop, R-Utah, raised concerns the hearing was too broad and not focused enough on the committee’s jurisdiction, which is federal conservation programs. Bishop said he wants the committee to spend more time talking about how forests can be managed to promote clean air and protect states from smoke pollution as a result of wildfires in states like California.

The federal government’s approach to managing forests to prevent wildfires has been a topic of discussion from Republicans and the administration, and Bishop said he would prefer to talk about that because it’s actually within the committee’s jurisdiction.

“I have to mention I’m kind of a loss, I don’t know where this hearing is going or the other six you have planned because you haven’t told us what the goal is. At some point we may be asking, where are we going? What is the real legislation to help people that is supposed to come out of these hearings? To understand whether these hearings are for those of us around the horseshoe that are going to make legislation or this group that’s sitting at a table in the corner so they can write cute stories,” Bishop said, pointing toward reporters in the hearing room.

Grijalva said the committee will be able to address a variety of issues as it holds hearings on climate change this year.

Freshman lawmaker Rep. Deb Haaland, D- New Mexico, gave an emotional thanks to one of the witnesses 16-year-old Nadia Nazar, a co-founder of the youth-led Zero Hour Movement.

“I, first of all, would like to thank Ms.Nazar for your commitment and your sacrifice to the things you believe in. I almost want to apologize to you and the youth of this world who go to bed every night worrying about what will happen to our communities because of climate change and I just want to recognize your presence her,” Haaland said.

But Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker, in response to comments that the administration should encourage technological advances to limit emissions instead of new policies, said past policy efforts have worked and show policies can make a difference when it comes to climate change.

“The northeast United States, when I was a much younger person, had a huge issue with acid rain which was mostly coming from the midwest. And that was a big problem as an environmental issue there was a lot of debate and discussion about it but a combination of state and federal policies over time basically solved it,” Baker said, adding that a similar combination of state and federal policies have helped contribute to the recovery of the ozone layer.

“Pretty clear indications that you can make a difference on big issues with policy,” he said.

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Posted On 07 Feb 2019