Two Marines, Navy corpsman under investigation in death of US contractor in Iraq: Officials

WORLD NEWS Two Marines, Navy corpsman under investigation in death of US contractor in Iraq: Officials  https://linewsradio.com/two-marines-navy-corpsman-under-investigation-in-death-of-us-contractor-in-iraq-officials/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

Sgt. Donald Holbert/U.S. Marine Corps(WASHINGTON) — Two U.S. Marines and a U.S. Navy corpsman are under investigation in connection with the death of a U.S. contractor in northern Iraq, according to two U.S. officials.

The New York Times was the first to report the incident.

The contractor’s death followed a physical altercation which took place on New Year’s Eve in the city of Erbil, one official said. The Times reported that the contractor was severely wounded and evacuated to Landstuhl, Germany before being pronounced dead on Jan. 4.

In a statement to ABC News, Lockheed Martin confirmed that one of their employees was “fatally injured while supporting Special Operations Forces.”

“Lockheed Martin was saddened to learn of the loss of one of our employees, who was fatally injured while supporting Special Operations Forces within the Operation Inherent Resolve area of operations in a non-combat related incident,” the statement said. “We are supporting the Naval Criminal Investigation Service as they conduct an investigation into the circumstances of his death. Our thoughts are with his family and friends, and we are committed to supporting them during this difficult time.”

Ed Buice, a spokesperson for the Naval Criminal Investigative Services (NCIS), confirmed the investigation, adding that “NCIS does not discuss the details of ongoing investigations.”

A spokesperson for Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command, Maj. Nicholas Mannweiler, told ABC News that they were aware of the death of the contractor and that “MARSOC is providing all requested support to investigators as they look into this incident.”

There are approximately 5,200 U.S. troops in Iraq.

News of the incident in Erbil comes as elite U.S. forces are under multiple investigations for deadly misconduct.

On Friday, a U.S. Navy SEAL pleaded not guilty in the stabbing of an Islamic State teenage fighter in Iraq in 2017. And in December, President Donald Trump said he would review the case of a former U.S. Green Beret charged with the murder of a suspected Taliban bomb maker in 2010. In November, two SEALs and two Marines were charged with murder and involuntary manslaughter in the death of Army Green Beret Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar in Mali in June 2017.

This spring, a Department of Defense report is due to the Senate and House Armed Services Committee on ethics and standards in the special operations community.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Jan 2019

Two Marines under investigation in the death of US contractor in Iraq: Officials

WORLD NEWS Two Marines under investigation in the death of US contractor in Iraq: Officials  https://linewsradio.com/two-marines-under-investigation-in-the-death-of-us-contractor-in-iraq-officials/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

Sgt. Donald Holbert/U.S. Marine Corps(WASHINGTON) — Two U.S. Marines are under investigation in connection with the death of a U.S. contractor in northern Iraq, according to two U.S. officials.

A U.S. Navy corpsman is also under investigation, according to the New York Times, which was the first to report the incident.

The contractor’s death followed a physical altercation which took place on New Year’s Eve in the city of Erbil, one official said. The Times reported that the contractor was severely wounded and evacuated to Landstuhl, Germany before being pronounced dead on Jan. 4.

In a statement to ABC News, Lockheed Martin confirmed that one of their employees was “fatally injured while supporting Special Operations Forces.”

“Lockheed Martin was saddened to learn of the loss of one of our employees, who was fatally injured while supporting Special Operations Forces within the Operation Inherent Resolve area of operations in a non-combat related incident,” the statement said. “We are supporting the Naval Criminal Investigation Service as they conduct an investigation into the circumstances of his death. Our thoughts are with his family and friends, and we are committed to supporting them during this difficult time.”

Ed Buice, a spokesperson for the Naval Criminal Investigative Services (NCIS), confirmed the investigation, adding that “NCIS does not discuss the details of ongoing investigations.”

A spokesperson for Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command, Maj. Nicholas Mannweiler, told ABC News that they were aware of the death of the contractor and that “MARSOC is providing all requested support to investigators as they look into this incident.”

There are approximately 5,200 U.S. troops in Iraq.

News of the incident in Erbil comes as elite U.S. forces are under multiple investigations for deadly misconduct.

On Friday, a U.S. Navy SEAL pleaded not guilty in the stabbing of an Islamic State teenage fighter in Iraq in 2017. And in December, President Donald Trump said he would review the case of a former U.S. Green Beret charged with the murder of a suspected Taliban bomb maker in 2010. In November, two SEALs and two Marines were charged with murder and involuntary manslaughter in the death of Army Green Beret Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar in Mali in June 2017.

This spring, a Department of Defense report is due to the Senate and House Armed Services Committee on ethics and standards in the special operations community.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Jan 2019

Kevin Hart apologizes to LGBTQ community again, but adds, “There has to be acceptance for change”

Entertainment News  Kevin Hart apologizes to LGBTQ community again, but adds, "There has to be acceptance for change" https://linewsradio.com/kevin-hart-apologizes-to-lgbtq-community-again-but-adds-there-has-to-be-acceptance-for-change/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

ABC/Ida Mae Astute(LOS ANGELES) — Monday on his Sirius XM radio show Straight from the Hart, comedian Kevin Hart addressed the ongoing controversy about stepping down as Oscars host after old homophobic tweets of his resurfaced. He reiterated his apology, but also expressed frustration that it hasn’t been accepted because it wasn’t done the “right” way.

In an advance clip of the program obtained by ABC Radio, Hart says, speaking in the third person, “I will say this, and I want to make this very clear….once again, Kevin Hart apologizes for his remarks that hurt members of the LGBTQ community. I apologize.”

Hart goes on to explain that he realizes why what he said is inappropriate.

“We thought it was okay to talk like that, because that’s how we talked to one another. [But then] you go ‘F**k. This is wrong now.’ Because now we’re in a space where I’m around people of the LGBTQ community, and I’m now aware of how these words make them feel,” the comedian says.

“So then we say, ‘Hey, man, as a group, let’s erase this s**t. We don’t talk like this no more.’  [And] within my comedy act, I’m going to make sure that I don’t do anything else offensive,'” he continues.

But according to Hart, that doesn’t seem to be enough for the LGBTQ community.

“If the fight from the LGBTQ community is equality…I’m riding with you guys. I understand it,” he says. “But in the fight for equality, that means that there has to be an acceptance for change. If you don’t want to accept people for their change, then…where does the equality part come in?”

Hart then claims that when the community wants people to change, and those people — including him — apologize, the community responds by saying, “But you didn’t say it right.”

“‘No, wait, guys, I just said “I’m sorry!”‘ ‘Not the way you should have!'”

And now, according to Hart, the LGBTQ community is “bullying” him.

As he puts it, “Now that I said what I said the way that I would say it — because I’m me — you’re now trying to change me into becoming what version of me you want me to be.”

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Jan 2019

Marvel Studios president wants “Vice” filmmaker Adam McKay to direct a Silver Surfer movie; insists “Guardians 3” will happen without James Gunn

Entertainment News  Marvel Studios president wants "Vice" filmmaker Adam McKay to direct a Silver Surfer movie; insists "Guardians 3" will happen without James Gunn https://linewsradio.com/marvel-studios-president-wants-vice-filmmaker-adam-mckay-to-direct-a-silver-surfer-movie-insists-guardians-3-will-happen-without-james-gunn/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

(L-R) Kevin Feige, “Captain Marvel” star Brie Larson/Marvel Studios(LOS ANGELES) — While the project is still years away, Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige already has a director in mind for a movie featuring comic book hero Silver Surfer: Golden Globe-nominated Vice director Adam McKay.

The Silver Surfer is one of many Marvel characters that its parent company Disney acquired from 20th Century Fox as part of a $71.3 billion deal. The Surfer is a fan favorite who many felt wasn’t done justice in the critically reviled 2007 film Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer.

“[Adam McKay is] an honest-to-goodness fan,” Feige told MTV News on the Golden Globes red carpet. “He did a lot of behind-the-scenes help with us on the first Ant-Man film.” McKay co-wrote that film with star Paul Rudd.

Feige also broke more news in that MTV chat by insisting a third Guardians of the Galaxy film is still on the table. The project was in development last year when series writer-director James Gunn was fired over a series of controversial tweets. 

Guardians will happen,” Feige told MTV, adding, ” — when, where, or how… [that’s] for another time.”

Disney is the parent company of Marvel and of ABC News.

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Posted On 07 Jan 2019

9-year-old boy calls 911, helps save his grandfather’s life

Somerset Police Department(SOMERSET, Mass.) — A Massachusetts grandfather had his 9-year-old grandson to thank for helping first responders save his life Saturday.

Kazin Crisman called 911 for his grandfather, Alan Crisman, when he was having a “life threatening medical emergency,” according to a post on the Somerset Police Department’s Facebook page.

Alan Crisman, 80, and Kazin were going to get pizza and had gotten into their car when Kazin told ABC affiliate WCVB-TV that he noticed his grandfather was “acting really strange.”

“I asked him, ‘Do you want me to call 911?’ He did not answer me all the four times that I asked him. I knew something was up,” Kazin told WCVB-TV.

Crisman told ABC News that he is a Type 1 Diabetic, and had hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar.

Kazin called 911 and discussed his grandfather’s symptoms and “other valuable information that assisted first responders in providing necessary medical treatment,” according to Somerset Police. Crisman said that Kazin explained what was happening, and that first responders quickly arrived prepared with glucose and IVs.

Crisman credited Kazin, whom he said he sees every week, for acting on his own instincts to save his life.

“He’s my little hero,” Crisman said.

Crisman said he called Kazin’s principal and said he appreciated the school teaching Kazin about 911. He also said that police ultimately bought a pizza for the two of them.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

American from Texas captured while fighting for ISIS, militia says

WORLD NEWS American from Texas captured while fighting for ISIS, militia says  https://linewsradio.com/american-from-texas-captured-while-fighting-for-isis-militia-says/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

Syrian Democratic Forces(WASHINGTON) — The Pentagon and the anti-ISIS coalition said they are aware of reports from America’s Kurdish allies in Syria that at least two American citizens who were allegedly fighting with ISIS have been captured.

“We are aware of open source reports of reportedly American citizens currently in custody who were believed to be fighting for ISIS. However, we are unable to confirm this information at this time. The incident is under investigation,” Commander Sean Robertson, a Pentagon spokesman, told ABC News.

The Washington-backed Syrian Democratic Forces announced the capture in a statement on Sunday, saying that two Americans, along with three other foreign nationals, were taken in the city of Hajeen in eastern Syria near the last ISIS stronghold of Deir ez-Zor.

Mustafa Bali, head of the SDF press office in northern Syria, wrote on Twitter: “These terrorists were captured by our forces this week in a Hajeen, two Americans, two Pakistanis and one Irishman.”

One of the alleged American captives was identified by the SDF as Warren Christopher Clark. According to the Houston Chronicle, Clark is originally from Houston and served as a substitute teacher in the Fort Bend Independent School District in Sugar Land, Texas.

Using the nom de guerre Abu Muhammad al-Ameriki, Clark allegedly sent a letter and a resume to the Islamic State offering his services as an English teacher in the caliphate.

The documents were recovered in a house in Mosul, Iraq, by a group of anti-terror investigators. Copies were given to ABC News by Seamus Hughes, deputy director of the program on extremism at George Washington University and a former staffer at the National Counterterrorism Center.

The letter purportedly written by Clark opened with a request for a teaching position at the University of Mosul, suggesting it would be a “great way of continuing my career.” The resume attached to the letter claimed that Clark was born in 1984 and earned a B.S. in political science from the University of Houston in 2007. The resume also indicated that Clark held teaching positions in Turkey and Saudi Arabia, in addition to the substitute teaching job in Sugar Land.

The letter concluded with the assertion that “teaching has given me the opportunity to work with people from diverse cultural backgrounds.”

In a lawfare blog post, Hughes wrote that Clark was a convert to Islam who became radicalized and was known to friends in Texas as a fervent Islamic State supporter. One acquaintance said he had assumed that Clark was an FBI informant because “no one is that open about liking terrorism,” according to Hughes.

Very little is known about the other alleged American ISIS member taken along with Clark, other than he was named by captors as 35 year-old Zaid Abed al-Hamid from the United States. However, it is not entirely clear if al-Hamid is even an American citizen.

Simon Cottee, a senior lecturer in criminology at the University of Kent, who is writing a book about Islamic State fundamentalists from Trinidad, said he came across al-Hamid’s name while investigating ISIS fighters from the Caribbean island nation.

Cottee said official estimates put the number of ISIS fighters from Trinidad and Tobago at 130, although he believes the real number is much higher.

“Hamid has been radical for a while,” Cottee told ABC News. “According to my field work al-Hamid left Trinidad for Syria in April 2014 with his wife and 3 boys – aged 7, 6 and 5. Once in Syria, they were based in Raqqa.”

Cottee said al-Hamid was arrested in 2011 on suspicion of conspiring to kill then Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar along with 15 other men, but they were never charged due to lack of evidence.

“Interestingly, of the 16 suspects, four ended up in Syria and Iraq. Another suspect among the 16 was captured in Venezuela in 2014 trying to leave for Syria,” Cottee said.

Al-Hamid and Clark were both reportedly captured during heavy fighting with the last significant group of ISIS militants in northern Syria. Only four other Americans are known to have been captured on the battlefield in Iraq and Syria, according to Hughes.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Jan 2019

Malala Yousafzai: ‘We have a lot to learn’ from refugees

WORLD NEWS Malala Yousafzai: 'We have a lot to learn' from refugees  https://linewsradio.com/malala-yousafzai-we-have-a-lot-to-learn-from-refugees/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

Lou Rocco / ABC(NEW YORK) — The youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate, Malala Yousafzai, spoke to the women of “The View” about refugees on Monday, saying that “we have a lot to learn from these young girls” who have been displaced around the world and are seeking a better life.

She highlights the story of two sisters, Zaynab, now 23, and Sabreen, now 21. Five years ago, they were separated after they fled Yemen together, and haven’t seen each other since.

Zaynab was granted a U.S. visa, moved to Minneapolis and was able to reunite with her mother after 14 years apart. Sabreen’s visa was rejected, and she has been living in Europe.

Yousafzai met Zaynab in 2015, and said “her resilience is inspiring.”

She also spoke about “difficulty when you come to a new country, and you want to achieve your dreams, achieve your goals in your life.”

In spite of those difficulties, she said Zaynab is “doing amazing in her academics, she’s also leading a soccer team and she is inspiring other refugee girls as well to dream big.”

Yousafzai explained she wasn’t highlighting these girls’ stories to portray them as victims. Instead, she aims to show “they’re courageous, they’re brave, they’re overcoming these difficulties — so we have a lot to learn from these young girls.”

Yousafzai gained international attention after she was shot in the head in 2012, in an assassination attempt for her advocacy work that focused on educating girls in Pakistan.

After the shooting, Yousafzai was hospitalized in Birmingham, England, where she has been living ever since.

In 2014, she received the Nobel Peace Prize at the age of 17.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Jan 2019

Amid confusion over Syria withdrawal, Pompeo heads to Middle East to reassure US partners

WORLD NEWS Amid confusion over Syria withdrawal, Pompeo heads to Middle East to reassure US partners  https://linewsradio.com/amid-confusion-over-syria-withdrawal-pompeo-heads-to-middle-east-to-reassure-us-partners/  http://abcnewsradioonline.com/world-news/

btgbtg/iStock(WASHINGTON) — With statements from National Security Adviser John Bolton contradicting President Donald Trump creating more confusion about whether the U.S. is withdrawing its 2,000 troops from Syria, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is heading to the Middle East for a whirlwind tour to reassure partners that the U.S. will remain a presence in the region.

Trump declared in December that ISIS had been defeated and, “Our boys, our young women, our men — they’re all coming back, and they’re coming back now.” The Pentagon confirmed shortly after that it would be a total withdrawal, completed in 30 days.

But after his surprise decision came under widespread criticism, the timeline for what the president had characterized as an immediate withdrawal has changed repeatedly.

A week after the president’s initial announcement, U.S. officials told ABC News that withdrawal would take several months, with no final decisions made about the planned pace.

Last week, Pompeo seemed to lay out four conditions for a U.S. exit, telling conservative outlet Newsmax the U.S. would continue its military campaign against ISIS, keep the pressure on Iran, protect Kurdish partner forces from Turkey, and ensure the safety of religious minorities in Syria.

The next day, senior State Department officials briefing reporters ahead of Pompeo’s trip said there was “no timeline for our military forces to withdraw from Syria.” Instead, the drawdown would be conducted “in a deliberate, heavily coordinated way with our allies and partners” in order to “maintain pressure on ISIS throughout, and [so] that we do not open up any vacuums for terrorists to exploit,” one senior official said.

Bolton, who traveled to Israel and Turkey over the weekend, repeated that idea alongside Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who reportedly opposed a U.S. withdrawal from Syria out of concern it would give Iran, an ally of Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad, an opening to further threaten Israel from Syria.

“There are objectives that we want to accomplish that condition the withdrawal,” Bolton told reporters Sunday in Jerusalem, specifically the defeat of remaining ISIS fighters in Syria and protection for Kurdish forces that served as the ground forces for the U.S. and its Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS as it took on the terror group.

While those Kurdish forces, known as the YPG and part of the larger Syrian Democratic Forces, were armed, trained, and advised by the U.S., America’s NATO ally Turkey says they are terrorists for their ties to Kurdish separatists in Turkey, a group known as the PKK that Turkey and the U.S. have designated a terrorist organization.

After Bolton’s remarks, Trump appeared on board with a delayed departure of U.S. troops, telling reporters, “I never said that we are doing it that quickly … We won’t be finally pulled out until ISIS is gone.”

But when asked when troops will come home, Trump added, “It’s going quickly.”

In the face of that confusion, Trump denied there was any contradiction on Monday, blasting a New York Times report as “very inaccurate” in a tweet: “No different from my original statements, we will be leaving at a proper pace while at the same time continuing to fight ISIS and doing all else that is prudent and necessary!”

It’s unclear what the president considers “prudent and necessary” — and whether he agrees with the specific conditions Bolton and Pompeo laid out.

But it will be Pompeo’s task now to clear the muddy waters for America’s partners, as he travels to Jordan, Egypt, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Oman, and Kuwait for a week of meetings. The message is despite the Syria withdrawal and cuts to funds for stabilization in Syria, the U.S. is not pulling out of the region, U.S. officials said.

“The United States is not leaving the Middle East,” a senior State Department official told reporters Friday. “The Secretary will reinforce that commitment to the region and our partners.”

Instead, he’ll seek to rally those countries to support the U.S. withdrawal from Syria by contributing more funding and possibly even troops.

The State Department cut $200 million in funds for projects like de-mining, rubble removal, and restoration of services like running water and hospitals — things that the U.S. previously said were critical to returning civilians to areas liberated from ISIS and prevent the terror group’s return. In place of U.S. funds, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and other countries will give over $300 million to those same projects.

With U.S. forces departing, there is renewed speculation that the Trump administration will be asking these partner countries to supply forces to patrol liberated areas — something that a senior State Department official did not outright dismiss, saying Friday there are no plans right now, but, “We’re exploring a variety of options.” It’s unclear how that would work, however, with Turkey and Assad and his allies Iran and Russia all likely opposed to such a move.

Among the other topics Pompeo will have to address is bridging the divide between Gulf partners Saudi Arabia and UAE and their neighboring foe Qatar, as well as the murder of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi.

Trump, Pompeo, and other top U.S. officials have denied that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was involved in the royal insider turned dissident’s killing, despite strong, repeated statements from Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill saying he was. Instead, the administration has defended the relationship with the Saudis, downplaying the murder plot as less important than stability in the kingdom.

The Saudis began the first trials of the 15-men hit squad they have blamed for the murder, saying it was a rogue operation at the order of the deputy intelligence chief and an aide to the crown prince, who have been fired. While the administration has so far not disputed that account, a senior State Department official said the U.S. is still not satisfied.

“I don’t think from our point of view that the narrative emerging from the Saudis or the legal process is yet — has yet hit that threshold of credibility and accountability,” the official said, but added they will work with the Saudis “to pursue this as aggressively as they can to get this albatross off their backs and to get out from under the shadow of this incident.”

Pompeo may address some of those challenges in a major address while in Cairo this week about how the U.S. is “a force for good in the region,” a senior official said.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Jan 2019

Will Smith and Martin Lawrence tease the start of production for ‘Bad Boys 3’

Entertainment News  Will Smith and Martin Lawrence tease the start of production for 'Bad Boys 3' https://linewsradio.com/will-smith-and-martin-lawrence-tease-the-start-of-production-for-bad-boys-3/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

Photo by SGranitz/WireImage(LOS ANGELES) —  Will Smith and Martin Lawrence are ready to get back to business.

During the Golden Globes on Sunday night, Smith took to Instagram to tease fans about the forthcoming third installment of Bad Boys. The actor shared a photo of a stack of scripts titled Bad Boys for Lif3, with a simple message.

“Day 1,” he wrote, indicating the first day of production. “I’ll keep ya’ll posted.”

On Monday, his Bad Boys co-star chimed in with his own note.

“Let’s get to work!,” Lawrence wrote. “#teammartymar #badboysforlife#hustlehard.”

As previously reported, the threequel will be directed by Moroccan-born directing duo Adil El Arbi and Bilall Fallah. It reunites Will Smith and Martin Lawrence after the last Bad Boys film, 2003’s Bad Boys II. In that movie, the two played Miami narcotics detectives on the trail of a Cuban drug smuggler. It film grossed over $273 million worldwide.

The original Bad Boys movie came out in 1995.

Bad Boys for Life is set to hit theaters over Martin Luther King Jr. weekend 2020.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Jan 2019

Lindsay Lohan stepping back into the spotlight with reality show; reveals new movie plans to ‘GMA’

Entertainment News  Lindsay Lohan stepping back into the spotlight with reality show; reveals new movie plans to 'GMA' https://linewsradio.com/lindsay-lohan-stepping-back-into-the-spotlight-with-reality-show-reveals-new-movie-plans-to-gma/ http://abcnewsradioonline.com/entertainment-news/

 

ABC(NEW YORK) — After a years-long acting hiatus, Lindsay Lohan officially announced not only her return to television but to movies as well.

“I felt comfortable enough to start being present again,” Lohan told Good Morning America about stepping back into the spotlight.

The actress, famous for her roles in The Parent Trap and Mean Girls, is now a businesswoman running a luxury club in Mykonos, Greece after successfully starting one in Athens. Her Mykonos club is the focus of a new MTV reality show, Lindsay Lohan’s Beach Club.

Lohan admitted that being the boss is “a lot of work,” adding, “It’s a journey, but it’s great…I wanted to share with the world and let everybody see what I’ve been doing while I haven’t been here.”

From 2007 to 2012, the actress was involved in a series of incidents with the law, ending up in and out of rehab and treatment programs for addiction.  She’s been open about her past struggles with drugs and alcohol, and hopes people see her business ventures in a positive light.

“I’m running the place, so I don’t have time for any of that,” she said of working in the club business.

Lohan, who appears in the Netflix series Sick Note, says she has even more projects in the works.

“I actually bought the rights to a really amazing book by Tina Seskis called The Honeymoon, so we’re working on the script now. So that, I will be in,” Lohan confirmed.

But in an era abundant with reboots, Lohan can’t confirm if there will be a Mean Girls comeback.

“I don’t know, it’s not a question for me,” she said, but added of she and the cast, “We’re all still friends.”

Lindsay Lohan’s Beach Club premieres Jan. 8 at 8 p.m. ET on MTV.

Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Posted On 07 Jan 2019