KFC Bringing Back the Popular ‘Double Down’

(NEW YORK) — This is not a drill: KFC plans to bring back its infamous Double Down starting April 21, reports USA Today. In case you forgot what this glorious creation includes, it’s a bunless “sandwich” that uses breaded and fried chicken breasts instead of bread, which enclose melted slices of Monterey Jack and pepper jack cheeses, two slices of bacon and the Colonel’s sauce.

“The Double Down launched originally in April 2010. It was a huge hit with fans, with more than 10 million sold in the first month, so it stayed on the menu past its original late May 2010 promotion-end date,” the company told Eater. “Many restaurants continued selling Double Downs throughout 2010. It has not been nationally promoted in four years.”

The company will reportedly be rolling out a media campaign for the official announcement called the “Double Down Dare.” Stay tuned for details on that one.

Miley Cyrus’ Allergic Reaction Explained

(NEW YORK) — Miley Cyrus was forced to cancel a couple of concert dates in Missouri this week due to a severe allergic reaction to antibiotics. Her camp has since shed more light on what exactly is bothering her.

A rep for Cyrus says in a statement that the singer obtained a prescription for an antibiotic known as cephalexin to treat a sinus infection that was diagnosed last week. She subsequently suffered an allergic reaction to the drug.

The rep says such a reaction can last from five to 27 days. The statement adds, “She will remain hospitalized and is under a doctor’s care until we see some improvement in her condition and is asking for your compassion and privacy at this time.”

Cyrus was hospitalized in Kansas City on Tuesday. So far, she’s cancelled dates in Kansas City and in St. Louis.

The allergic reaction occurred one week after she cancelled a concert in Charlotte, N.C., due to a bout with the flu.

The Biggest Cost of Owning a Car May Surprise You

(NEW YORK) — Many consumers may not know this, but the largest cost of owning a car is depreciation.

According to new research from the auto price valuation firm ALG, the process begins on day one.

Consider a new car or SUV that sells for $30,000: “On average you lose almost $5,000 literally driving it off the dealer lot,” ALG President Larry Dominique says. “Typically, after three years, the vehicle is worth about half what it was when you first purchased the car.”

Most motorists pay attention to gas and insurance costs but, as Dominique notes, “the number one thing we see with cars over time is the depreciation whether you own that car three years, four years, seven years.”

A nearly new car loses value at a much faster rate than an older vehicle.